10 Best Hobbies for People with Anxiety 

The following 10 hobbies are fun activities that Sandra Glavan, Life Coach adopted to manage her anxiety. You don’t need to introduce all of these 10 activities, to relieve your anxiety.

One hobby is perfect enough.

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1. Writing Expressively

I have intentionally listed writing at the top because I highly recommend to every person with anxiety to try expressive writing as a way of releasing their thoughts and emotions. 

Expressive writing is a highly effective anxiety management technique, and in my experience once you start to notice the benefits you are likely to get pleasure from engaging in this activity.

2. Listening to Calming Music 

Regularly listening to calming music can be a highly effective way to calm down quickly and ease your anxiety symptoms.

One study in 2017 concluded that

Music listening is associated with a decreased level of anxiety and distress.

This is one of my favorite hobbies for relieving anxiety, because I realized very early on that each time I would put on my headphones and listen to relaxing sounds on YouTube my anxiety would start to ease instantly.

I found this to be incredible, and putting on calming music became one of my emergency anti-anxiety measures.

3. Reading Empowering Books

A 2009 study at the University of Sussex found that reading can reduce stress by up to 68%, so this is a highly effective hobby for people suffering from stress and anxiety.

Reading powerful books by beautiful authors such as Louise Hay, Eckhart Tolle, Jen Sincero, Deepak Chopra, Bruce Lipton, Thich Nhat Hanh, Jack Kornfield, Shakti Gawain, and Wayne Dyer, helped me to get out a very dark anxiety hole.

I can’t thank these people enough for spreading such powerful messages and I have come to love their work so much.

Without exaggeration, I have read some of their books over and over again and I still pick them up now and read a few random pages when I need to be inspired.

If you don’t have the time to read, you can listen to all of these books instead by signing up to a platform such as Audible.

View all 10 hobbies for stress relief below:

Hint: Could you enjoy walking, yoga or eating? Click below and find out!

Source: 10 Best Hobbies for People with Anxiety to Calm You Down Instantly (amosuir.com)

Don’t Grow These Vegetables Next to Each Other

A garden is like a community. Some members of that community live quietly next to each other, and others demand their own space. Some will even rob valuable nutrients from nearby neighbors. Make sure your companion plants happily coexist. Here are a few plants that don’t play well with others.

© Zbynek Pospisil/Getty Images

Beans and Onions

Beans are considered allelopathic plants, which means they produce biochemicals that can hinder the growth of another plant. Beans do not do well with members of the onion family, such as onion, leek, chives and garlic. Beans and carrots complement each other, giving each other nutrients that encourage growth. Carrots also help beans by attracting ladybugs that keep aphids from damaging leaves.

Tomatoes and Corn

Tomatoes and corn fight each other for soil nutrients if planted too close together. The tomato hornworm and certain types of fungus love corn and tomatoes, so separating the two prevents mass extinction of both. Tomatoes also don’t like cabbage or potatoes. Instead, pair with lettuce, which will be shaded and keep the soil moist for the water-loving tomatoes.

Potatoes and Sunflowers

One grows deep and the other rises high. However, they don’t get along because sunflower seeds contain a toxic ingredient that prevents potatoes from growing fully. Grow spinach for early harvest around the potato hills, before the potato plants need soil mounding.

Asparagus and Garlic

These two incompatible plants share the same need for nutrients in the soil, and asparagus is a real quitter if it can’t get everything it needs. Your best bet is to give asparagus its own bed with no competition. But if you must give it a friend, try parsley or dill.

Celery and Carrots

We often pair them on a vegetable platter, but these plants should avoid each other in the garden. Both need water and shade and seek a taller leafed-out companion like beans to keep the soil moist. Use thyme as a companion to celery, which will smother weeds and moisten the soil.

Eggplant and Fennel

Eggplant is a member of the nightshade family, and fennel produces a chemical that slows nightshade growth. Instead, choose bush beans as eggplant’s companion. Eggplant loves the nitrogen that the bush beans add to the soil. And the bush bean repels the Colorado potato beetle, which has a taste for eggplant.

Cucumber and Rosemary

The cucumber can take on the flavors of strong herbs, so keep rosemary, basil and sage away until blending them into a delicious salad in the kitchen. Allow cucumbers to vine by giving them a trellis, which helps them avoid rotting on moist soil.

Lettuce and Garlic

Poor garlic hinders many plants, including producing chemicals that wilts lettuce in place. Keep lettuce away from garlic’s cousins, too — onion, leeks and chives. Instead, plant lettuce next to that power pair of carrots and radishes. The shallow roots of quick-growing lettuce won’t disturb the root crops.

Parsnips and Carrots

These two root crops like the same growing conditions, but both are susceptible to the carrot root fly. So, it’s best to give them their own space, far from each other. Both plants would rather line up with radishes, as the little round radish grows quickly. Once the radishes are pulled, there is growing space between the longer-growing carrot or parsnip.

Pumpkins and Summer Squash

Pumpkins are aggressive garden plants. They can choke out summer squash such as zucchini that competes for water and space. Pumpkins will also cross-pollinate with other squash varieties, affecting your harvest. Pumpkins like to sprawl and snake up corn’s thick stalk. The two vegetables are harvested at different times, so they won’t compete for precious water in the late summer.

Story by Rosie Wolf Williams for The Family Handyman©

HEADS UP: PayPal hacker attack exposes customer names and social security numbers.

© Kurt Knutsson

Last Thursday, PayPal began notifying nearly 35,000 of its customers that their accounts were breached between Dec. 6 and 8. During the two days, PayPal claims that no money was stolen from anyone.

The hackers were still able to obtain personal and private information, including full names, dates of birth, physical addresses, social security numbers and tax identification numbers. PayPal halted the intrusion within two days, reset the passwords for affected users and said no unauthorized transactions were attempted.

PayPal’s internal investigation revealed that the hackers used a method known as credit stuffing to breach the accounts of these victims. Credential stuffing is when hackers use existing credentials already floating around the dark web to hack into private accounts. They use bots with lists of usernames and passwords acquired in previous data breaches and try the credentials at multiple online services with the hope that customers have not recently changed their passwords. This is where those who use the same passwords across multiple different accounts could run into a big problem. 

If you were one of the victims of this PayPal attack, then PayPal should have already reset your password. When you go to make a new password, make sure it is a strong password with capital and lowercase letters, numbers and symbols. The company is also offering victims two years of free identity monitoring from Equifax.

There are steps you can take to ensure that something like this never happens to you.

  • Create strong passwords and don’t use the same ones for multiple accounts: you can find out more about creating strong passwords and great password managers 
  • Use 2-factor authentication: take advantage of 2-factor authentication for any services you use that offer it. This is one extra step that will keep a hacker out of your private information even if they get their hands on your login credentials.

Copyright 2023 CyberGuy.com.

Breaking News English Lesson: Artificial Intelligence in Australia

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The increasing ubiquity of artificial intelligence in our lives is creating waves in academia. Three universities in Australia have adopted what seems like a landmark policy. The three institutions are allowing students to use AI when taking assessments, albeit under strict conditions. Professor Romy Lawson said: “Instead of banning students from using such programs, we aim to assist academic staff and students to use digital tools to support learning.” The Internet abounds with AI text generators. These can be used to create essays that look authentic enough to fool examiners. The content created by these AI tools evade detection by even the smartest of anti-plagiarism tools.

Artificial Intelligence is posing huge challenges to exam integrity. It is the biggest disruptor since calculators were allowed into math tests. The latest quandary for educators comes from a language processing chatbox called ChatGPT. This can produce highly authentic human-like content on any subject in seconds. It has sparked fears that students will use it to write essays. The University of South Australia’s Dr Vitomir Kovanovic said teachers needed to embrace AI. He said: “You cannot stop it. The alternative is the Middle Ages – going to pen and paper.” He added that universities needed to change with the times. He said: “It’s like having a driving school but teaching people how to ride horses.”

Source: breakingnewsenglish.com

Matching Exercise.

What Makes Someone Boring to Other People and How to Stop it

Forget about delusions of grandeur — turns out many of us could be suffering from delusions of being interesting.

A new paper, “Boring People: Stereotype Characteristics, Interpersonal Attributions, and Social Reactions,” set about identifying what makes a person boring, and the results are pretty harsh.

Led by the University of Essex’s Wijnand Van Tilburg​​, researchers asked more than 500 people to rank the most boring characteristics, hobbies and jobs in other people. Here are some of the top results of those surveys. (Prepare to be offended.) 

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Boring personality traits:

No sense of humor

Bad conversationalist

Being inactive

Self-centered

Actively disliking things 

Boring occupations:

Accounting

Banking and finance

Librarian

Manual labor

Sales

Boring hobbies:

Watching TV

Collecting

Crafts

Gaming

Playing golf

What’s so bad about being boring?

While no one wants to see people stifling yawns whenever they start to speak, the study suggests that being boring can have a bigger negative impact on our lives than we think. Study subjects admitted to regarding boring people as a burden that they would rather avoid than suffer through in social and business settings. “Our research shows that people who possess stereotypically boring features are perceived as both less interpersonally warm and less competent, and they elicit social avoidance by others,” write the researchers.

How to not be boring

Does this mean you are doomed if you are an accountant who isn’t good at small talk and likes to knit on the weekends? Of course not. Psychology Today suggests these methods to keep yourself off the dull list:

1. Don’t complain to other people.

Friends are interested to know if something serious is happening in your life, but no one wants to hear you go on and on about a delayed flight.

2. Don’t talk about yourself — ask people questions about their lives.

And don’t just ask one question, follow up to get deeper. This isn’t being nosey, it is being interested.

3. Don’t be afraid to change the topic of conversation, even if it seems random.

People tend to perceive this as rude, but it is a surefire way to keep a conversation crackling.

4. Be present when someone is talking (i.e. don’t grunt while checking your phone).

Body language is just as important as what you say to show that you are engaged.

5. Told a story that got a good laugh? Remember and retell it at your next gathering. 

Like a standup comedian, have a couple of reliable stories to fall back on. (Note: only do this if you’re not hanging out with the same people!)

Now, go forth and be the riveting friend and colleague you’re almost certain you are.

By Dan Bova for Entrepreneur.com©

Source: Scientists Have Determined What Makes You Boring to Other People (chron.com)

Also, check out tutoringyou.org “Conversation Starters” for easy small-talk ideas.

This Weeks Celebrations

January 22

  • Celebration of Life Day
  • Chinese New Year
  • Come in From the Cold Day
  • National Bible Sunday (fourth Sunday in January)
  • National Blonde Brownie Day
  • National Hot Sauce Day
  • National Polka Dot Day
  • Roe vs. Wade Day

January 23

  • Better Business Communication Day (fourth Monday in January)
  • Community Manager Appreciation Day (fourth Monday in January)
  • Measure Your Feet Day
  • National Handwriting Day
  • National Pie Day
  • Snowplow Mailbox Hockey Day

January 24

  • Beer Can Appreciation Day
  • Belly Laugh Day
  • Change a Pet’s Life Day
  • International Mobile Phone Recycling Day
  • National Compliment Day
  • National “Just Do It” Day
  • National Peanut Butter Day
  • Speak Up and Succeed Day (fourth Tuesday in January)

January 25

  • Library Shelfie Day (fourth Wednesday in January)
  • Macintosh Computer Day
  • National Irish Coffee Day
  • National IV Nurse Day
  • Opposite Day
  • Thank Your Mentor Day

January 26

  • Clashing Clothes Day (fourth Thursday in January)
  • National Green Juice Day
  • National Peanut Brittle Day
  • National Pistachio Day
  • Spouse’s Day

January 27

  • Chocolate Cake Day
  • International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust
  • National Fun at Work Day (last Friday in January)
  • National Geographic Day
  • National Preschool Health and Fitness Day (last Friday in January)
  • Punch the Clock Day
  • Vietnam Peace Day
  • World Breast Pumping Day

January 28

  • Christa McAuliffe Day
  • Daisy Day
  • Global Community Engagement Day
  • International LEGO Day
  • Local Quilt Shop Day (fourth Saturday in January)
  • National Blueberry Pancake Day
  • National Data Privacy Day
  • National Kazoo Day
  • National Pediatrician Day
  • National Seed Swap Day (last Saturday in January)
  • Pop Art Day

Source: https://parade.com/living/january-holidays-observances

Don’t Toss It, Plant It! 12 Vegetables You Can Regrow from Scraps

Kitchen scrap gardening saves you money on grocery bills and reduces waste. Regrow your kitchen waste into edible veggies and greens!

What Is Kitchen Scrap Gardening?

Kitchen scrap gardening is the ultimate in recycling. It’s environmentally friendly, can save on grocery bills, and it’s a fun, hands-on science lesson for young children.

Here are some of the best scraps to get growing. You’ll probably get better results if you start with high-quality organic produce since some non-organic produce is actually treated to prevent sprouting. Also, keep in mind the climate you live in will determine if and when plants started from scraps can be transferred to an outdoor garden.

A Few Things To Keep In Mind

Not everything will sprout. Check on your plants and if after a week you don’t see anything is happening, compost the scraps and try again.

 Romaine Lettuce

Growing romaine lettuce from scraps is similar to growing green onions and celery. Cut off the lettuce you plan to eat and leave a couple of inches at the base. Place this romaine heart in water and new leaves will start to grow from the center. Remove outer leaves as they start to die. You can eventually plant your romaine in soil when the time is right.

Potato

Small potatoes can be planted whole. For large potatoes like bakers, cut into pieces making sure there are a couple of eyes on each piece. Allowing the pieces to dry out for a day or two may help prevent rotting. Plant the pieces in your garden or a container filled with well-drained potting mix and wait for them to sprout. In a few months, you should be able to dig up a whole bunch of new potatoes!

Basil, Cilantro, and Other Herbs

Re-growing herbs, such as basil and cilantro, is fairly easy to do. Cut a stem about four inches long, and place it into a glass of water. Be sure that the leaves are not submerged in the water. Place your stem in a bright area, but out of direct sunlight. In a few days, look for roots forming. Once these roots are about an inch long, go ahead and transplant them into some soil. In no time you will have your very own flourishing herb garden.

Regrow Vegetables From Seeds

Don’t stop with just scraps! You can also retrieve your own seeds from your food scraps in order to propagate. Rinse off the slimy, seedy insides of your organic tomatoes and allow them to dry thoroughly. Plant them in a container inside until sprouted to a few inches tall, when they can then be transplanted outside. Peppers, cucumbers, pumpkins, winter squash, and microgreens can all also be re-grown by salvaging their seeds. Turn those composting scraps into new, edible treasures.

Read about 9 more items to regrow by tapping the link below.

Source: Don’t Toss It, Plant It! 12 Vegetables You Can Regrow From Scraps – Farmers’ Almanac – Plan Your Day. Grow Your Life. (farmersalmanac.com)

‘Knolling’ Is ‘Kondoing’ for Maximalists

In short, “knolling” is an organizational method that involves arranging groups of tools and other everyday like objects into parallel lines or 90 degree angles. The result is a workspace that looks clean and symmetrical, where the items you use regularly are clearly displayed, instead of tidied away. Your stuff is not only accessible, but also aesthetically pleasing.

Photo: nadianb (Shutterstock)

You may have also seen Instagram posts featuring knolling—similar to the image above—where its more commonly referred to as “flat-lay photography.”

The name “knolling” is a reference to Knoll, Inc.: An American furniture company founded in 1938 that has manufactured chairs, tables, desks, and storage pieces from iconic designers and architects, including Eero Saarinen, Florence Knoll, Marcel Breuer, and Frank Gehry.

The organizational method dates back to 1987, when sculptor Andrew Kromelow and artist Tom Sachs were both working in Gehry’s studio. Kromelow coined the term, and Sachs popularized it.

How to use knolling to organize your space

In 2010, Sachs created a video for his employees titled “10 Bullets,” which he described as “the studio manual.” One of the 10 bullets is “Always Be Knolling,” in which he breaks down the organizational method into four steps:

  1. Scan your environment for materials, tools, books, music, etc., which are not in use.
  2. Put away everything not in use. If you aren’t sure, leave it out.
  3. Group all like objects.
  4. Align or square all objects to either the surface they rest on or the studio itself.

Source:

‘Knolling’ Is ‘Kondoing’ for Maximalists (lifehacker.com)

Don’t Believe These Myths About Gas Stoves

Gas stoves are the latest innocuous item to turn into a culture war symbol, due to rumors that they might, at some point in the future, be banned. But are gas stoves really that bad for us? Are government agents going to come and take them away? And if the health concerns are real, are we doomed?

© Photo: PandaStudio (Shutterstock)

The government is not coming to take your gas stove

If you’ve been paying attention to the political controversy, you may have noticed some political figures yelling about how they are prepared to physically defend their gas ranges from government intervention.

There aren’t even any regulations pending

This whole firestorm was ignited when a member of the Consumer Product Safety Commission said in an interview that the CPSC is planning to open a public comment period soon about how and whether to regulate indoor air pollution from gas stoves. This regulation might include include things like warning labels on the stoves or requirements for ventilation when they are installed, but the member also remarked that “products that can’t be made safe can be banned.”

The head of the CPSC clarified that there’s no ban in the works, and that the agency is “exploring new ways to address health risks” including voluntary industry standards.

The link between gas stoves and health concerns is real

So are gas stoves bad for us? Probably! Studies have linked childhood asthma to growing up with a gas stove. The cause-and-effect hasn’t been fully teased out, though. For one thing, kids who breathe the indoor air pollution from gas stoves are often exposed to a lot of outdoor air pollution as well.

But we do know that gas stoves release nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and particulates—all of which are considered indoor air pollution. Cooking on electric and other ranges can also emit particulates, hinting that ventilation for all types of cooking is probably a good idea. But we know that gas stoves create more of these types of air pollution than electric ranges.

All in all, there is good reason to be concerned about the health effects of gas stoves. It’s not a rip-your-stove-out emergency, but if you happen to be shopping for a new stove, you might want to consider electric or induction ranges.

There are ways to mitigate the health concerns

One thing that’s gotten lost in the recent controversy is that gas stoves aren’t a take-it-or-leave-it proposition. If you have a gas stove and are concerned about the health effects, there are things you can do to mitigate the risk.

The biggest one is ventilation. Some stoves are installed with a range hood above them, which sucks air from the vicinity of the stovetop, and blows it…somewhere. This is where it’s worth finding out what kind you have. Some exhaust the air to the outside, while others just blow it back into your face—hopefully after passing it through a filter.

Venting your range hood outside is great if you can swing it—definitely something to consider if you’re renovating your kitchen. In the meantime, consider opening windows or using fans in the room for extra ventilation when you’re cooking. (Some older houses have a fan built into the wall for this purpose.) If you don’t use your range hood because it’s loud and annoying, a quieter range hood could be a good investment.

Another way to address the particulate matter in the kitchen is with a HEPA filtered air purifier. This will pull particulates out of the air, and they tend to run quietly and be unobtrusive.

Source: https://lifehacker.com/

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