April 1, April Fools’ Day

Although April Fools’ Day, also called All Fools’ Day, has been celebrated for several centuries by different cultures, its exact origins remain a mystery.

Some historians speculate that April Fools’ Day dates back to 1582, when France switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, as called for by the Council of Trent in 1563.

People who were slow to get the news or failed to recognize that the start of the new year had moved to January 1 and continued to celebrate it during the last week of March through April 1 became the butt of jokes and hoaxes.

These pranks included having paper fish placed on their backs and being referred to as “poisson d’avril” (April fish), said to symbolize a young, easily caught fish and a gullible person.

READ MORE: 9 Outrageous Pranks That People Actually Fell For

Historians have also linked April Fools’ Day to festivals such as Hilaria, which was celebrated in ancient Rome at the end of March and involved people dressing up in disguises.

There’s also speculation that April Fools’ Day was tied to the vernal equinox, or first day of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, when Mother Nature fooled people with changing, unpredictable weather.

April Fools’ Day spread throughout Britain during the 18th century. In Scotland, the tradition became a two-day event, starting with “hunting the gowk,” in which people were sent on phony errands (gowk is a word for cuckoo bird, a symbol for fool) and followed by Tailie Day, which involved pranks played on people’s derrieres, such as pinning fake tails or “kick me” signs on them.

In modern times, people have gone to great lengths to create elaborate April Fools’ Day hoaxes. Newspapers, radio and TV stations and Web sites have participated in the April 1 tradition of reporting outrageous fictional claims that have fooled their audiences.

In 1957, the BBC reported that Swiss farmers were experiencing a record spaghetti crop and showed footage of people harvesting noodles from trees; numerous viewers were fooled. In 1985, Sports Illustrated tricked many of its readers when it ran a made-up article about a rookie pitcher named Sidd Finch who could throw a fastball over 168 miles per hour.

In 1996, Taco Bell, the fast-food restaurant chain, duped people when it announced it had agreed to purchase Philadelphia’s Liberty Bell and intended to rename it the Taco Liberty Bell. In 1998, after Burger King advertised a “Left-Handed Whopper,” scores of clueless customers requested the fake sandwich.

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Happy St. Patrick’s Day

This St. Patrick’s Day finds the world battling the coronavirus pandemic.  Interesting to note that the Irish people weren’t particularly religious until disaster struck them during the potato famine in the mid-1840’s.  It was that country’s time to embrace religion and why today Ireland is still predominately a Catholic country.

Despite American media’s attempt to quash all reference to God or religion, we American’s are basically Christian’s at heart and soul.  So, at this time of world-wide anxiety, I offer a prayer that each one of you, Christian or not,  find peace, health and happiness in your life.  May our creator lift this burden from our shoulders, so we can see a more blessed future as one world community of believers.

Now for some whimsy from:

https://www.thoughtco.com/st-patricks-day-printables-1832873

 

patrickword-58b97ea15f9b58af5c4a498b

 

March Madness 2020

2020 NCAA Men's Final Four logo.svg

No, it’s not Super Tuesday or spring-times nearness.  It’s U.S. college basketball finals.  That’s right ! Times to chug some brews and cheer on your favorite college bb team to victory.

The NCAA describes it as:

March Madness is one of the biggest, most exciting and most fun events in all of sports. Here’s everything you need to know about the NCAA Division I men’s basketball tournament, which has been played annually since 1939.

What is March Madness?

The NCAA Division I men’s basketball tournament is a single-elimination tournament of 68 teams that compete in seven rounds for the national championship. The penultimate round is known as the Final Four, when (you guessed it) only four teams are left.

What (and when) is Selection Sunday?

Selection Sunday is the day when the Selection Committee reveals the full NCAA tournament bracket, including all teams and all seeds. In 2020, Selection Sunday is on March 15. It will be broadcast at 6 p.m. ET on CBS.

When is 2020’s March Madness?

Here is the full schedule for 2020’s NCAA tournament. It will stream on March Madness Live.

2020 NCAA tournament schedule and locations:

Dates Round Watch City, STATE Host(s) Facility
March 15 Selection Sunday 6 p.m. ET on CBS N/A CBS will broadcast the Selection Show at 6 p.m. ET N/A
March 17-18 First Four March Madness Live Dayton, OH University of Dayton UD Arena
March 19/21 1st/2nd Rounds March Madness Live Albany, NY Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Times Union Center
March 19/21 1st/2nd Rounds March Madness Live Spokane, WA University of Idaho Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena
March 19/21 1st/2nd Rounds March Madness Live St. Louis, MO Missouri Valley Conference Enterprise Center
March 19/21 1st/2nd Rounds March Madness Live Tampa, FL University of South Florida Amalie Arena
March 20/22 1st/2nd Rounds March Madness Live Greensboro, NC Atlantic Coast Conference Greensboro Coliseum
March 20/22 1st/2nd Rounds March Madness Live Omaha, NE Creighton University CenturyLink Center Omaha
March 20/22 1st/2nd Rounds March Madness Live Sacramento, CA Sacramento State University Golden 1 Center
March 20/22 1st/2nd Rounds March Madness Live Cleveland, OH Mid-American Conference/Cleveland State Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse
March 26/28 Midwest Regional March Madness Live Indianapolis, IN Horizon League/IUPUI Lucas Oil Stadium
March 26/28 West Regional March Madness Live Los Angeles, CA Pepperdine University STAPLES Center
March 27/29 South Regional March Madness Live Houston, TX University of Houston Toyota Center
March 27/29 East Regional March Madness Live New York, NY St. John’s University/Big East Conference Madison Square Garden
April 4/6 Final Four and title game TBSMarch Madness Live Atlanta, GA Georgia Institute of Technology Mercedes-Benz Stadium

When did March Madness start?

The first NCAA Division I men’s basketball tournament was in 1939, and it has been held every year since.

Where did the term “March Madness” come from?

March Madness was first used to refer to basketball by an Illinois high school official, Henry V. Porter, in 1939, but the term didn’t find its way to the NCAA tournament until CBS broadcaster Brent Musburger (who used to be a sportswriter in Chicago) used it during coverage of the 1982 tournament. The term has been synonymous with the NCAA Division I men’s basketball tournament ever since.

 

Need more info ?  Go to the NCAA website and start buying the beer:

https://www.ncaa.com/news/basketball-men/bracketiq/2020-02-27/what-march-madness-ncaa-tournament-explained

 

Seriously Easy and Fun St. Patrick’s Day Decorations

Wood Clover Sign

A minimalist, painted sign like this one is a surprisingly easy way to add some St. Patty’s cheer,

Get the tutorial at A Night Owl Blog»

St Patrick's Day Decorations/Decorating Ideas

Mantel Display

These quirky modern wreathes all look great individually. But combined together they create a really stunning mantel display.

Get the tutorial from Design Improved »

 St Patrick's Day Decorations/Decorating Ideas

Case of Clovers

Sew (or glue) these multicolor fabric shamrocks to a cloth background, place it in shadow box, and you’ve got yourself one easy and understated piece of wall art.

Get the tutorial at Flamingo Toes»

St Patrick's Day Decorations/Decorating Ideas

Much more at:

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/holidays/g4968/st-patricks-day-decorations/?slide=1

Irish-Inspired Dining Room

 

Article and photo’s by Nina Hendrick

I tried to capture the collected charm that I associate with Ireland. Plenty of beautiful and wild looking flowers, greenery, moss, and naturally- clover. The rustic pieces tie into the old world charm of the country. I added my Waterford flatware and crystal glasses as a nod to the country’s beautiful craftsmanship. My lace-edged napkins and carved wooden chargers seem to hint at the culture as well.

 

Gather St. Patricks Day inspiration with this Irish-inspired dining room and tablescape decor for spring from Nina Hendrick Design Co.

Gather St. Patrick’s Day Inspiration with this Irish Tablescape and Dining Room Décor.

Gather St. Patricks Day inspiration with this Irish-inspired dining room and tablescape decor for spring from Nina Hendrick Design Co.

Gather St. Patricks Day inspiration with this Irish-inspired dining room and tablescape decor for spring from Nina Hendrick Design Co.

Gather St. Patricks Day inspiration with this Irish-inspired dining room and tablescape decor for spring from Nina Hendrick Design Co.

Gather St. Patricks Day inspiration with this Irish-inspired dining room and tablescape decor for spring from Nina Hendrick Design Co.

Visit Nina’s website at:

https://www.ninahendrick.com/irish-inspired-dining-room/

How Ash Wednesday orients us to the season of Lent

The following 40-day period begins the most solemn time in Christianity.  Commencing on Ash Wednesday, this time prepares us for the final chapter in Jesus’ life, his crucifixion and resurrection from the dead, which forms the basis of Christians faith.

 

Image result for ash wednesday

Article by Jaime L. Waters February 20, 2020

On Ash Wednesday, we begin the liturgical season of Lent. During this 40-day period, we prepare ourselves individually and collectively to celebrate Christ’s sacrifice on the cross and resurrection from the dead. Today’s readings help to orient us to this season.

Why do we begin Lent by wearing ashes? The first reading from Joel offers insights. The prophet describes an event called the Day of the Lord, a day associated with judgment and destruction. To avoid its consequences, Joel tells his community to perform outward expressions of mourning, such as fasting and weeping (Jl 2:12). These actions enable the people to correct their behavior and focus on improving their relationships with God. Wearing ashes, which can be a sign of mourning, unites us as we embark on this solemn period. The ashes remind us to be introspective and to behave in a way that nurtures our relationship with God. As the second reading proclaims, “we are ambassadors for Christ as if God were appealing through us” (2 Cor 5:20). Today we physically show our beliefs with ashes, but our actions throughout the year must be our actual hallmark.

In the Gospel from Matthew, Jesus outlines three practices especially associated with Lent: almsgiving, prayer and fasting. As wearing ashes does, these acts unite the Christian community in shared practices that help us to live more intentional lives. Almsgiving encourages us to do charitable works. Prayer enables us to commune with God and one another. Fasting directs our attention away from physical needs to focus on spiritual fullness. Yet, Jesus warns that these practices should not be done in order to boast to others. We wear ashes not to show off our holiness to the world but to expose our commitment to consciously living in the manner of Christ.

Our ashes are powerfully symbolic. Made in the shape of the cross, they physically remind us of Christ’s crucifixion and death. They remind us of our own mortality, and they connect us with past liturgical celebrations. Importantly, the ashes we wear are the remains of burnt palm fronds from last year’s celebration of Palm Sunday. Burning palms to produce ashes is a sustainable practice that connects us today with past communities of believers. Our ashes should empower us to seriously embark on this Lenten journey as a community. During this season, we should take actions that foster our connections to God and one another as we prepare for the celebration of Jesus’ death and resurrection.

 

Art by olrgreenville.com

https://www.americamagazine.org/faith/2020/02/20/how-ash-wednesday-orients-us-season-lent

Fat Tuesday–February 25

Mardi Gras 2020

Mardi Gras

Mardi Gras
Mardi Gras, or Fat Tuesday, refers to events of the Carnival celebration, beginning on or after the Christian feasts of the Epiphany and culminating on the day before Ash Wednesday, which is known as Shrove Tuesday. Mardi Gras is French for “Fat Tuesday”, reflecting the practice of the last night of eating rich, fatty foods before the ritual Lenten sacrifices and fasting of the Lenten season.

 

Parties, parades, celebrations and cool costumes galore.  Such is Mardi Gras.

See the source image

See the source image

 

 

Credit to Calendarpedia,  Wikipedia and Metro