‘Always ask for your receipt’

Customer says Burger King worker secretly charged her extra to pocket some money

A TikToker says that a Burger King employee stole $16 dollars from her at a location in Taylor, Michigan.

Her receipt shows that she paid $16 dollars in cash and then paid the bill in full on her credit card. In the comments of the video, the TikToker says that because she paid $16 dollars in cash, her card should have been charged $18.95 (the bill in full was $34.95).

In a TikTok posted on Feb. 4, @mrshardy2011 shows her receipt from the Burger King in question. In it, she tells another person that the actions of the employee could get her in serious trouble. The TikToker wrote in the video’s caption that the worker “told the police I didn’t give her cash” and commented that a supervisor at Burger King told her that the employee wasn’t fired, though disciplinary action was taken.

“I’m writing corporate,” the TikToker commented. @mrshardy2011’s video has been viewed over 73,000 times.

Commenters on @mrshardy2011’s video said they had had similar experiences.

“Someone at a McDonald’s stole my moms credit card numbers and was ordering off Amazon,” @moodymoonie97 commented. “They got nerve.”

“I legit had this happen to me today at the exact same store!” @naeeh9 wrote.

“That location has done that to me as well before,” @k_lynne925 commented. “One time I went there at 12 in the afternoon and they said I’m sorry we’re not open yet.”

“I stopped going to that one after the manager claimed my card declined but charged it 4 times and tried to deny it,” @dani3times wrote.

Others offered the TikToker advice about her situation.

“Always ask for your receipt. I noticed these restaurants will keep your receipt,” @sheritagriffin318 wrote.

“Just show the cops, have manager count the drawer and call corporate,” @notapickmedale commented. “It’s all on video.”

Source: ‘Always ask for your receipt’: Customer says Burger King worker secretly charged her extra to pocket some money (msn.com)

If You Get This Message from Lowe’s, Don’t Open It

From unsolicited product announcements to various offers and promotions, we’re all used to receiving a flurry of emails from the stores we frequent. With so many messages, it can feel like a chore to sort through what you might want to keep and what you want to banish to your junk folder. But don’t just skim through every retailer’s emails haphazardly to clear out your inbox. Lowe’s shoppers have recently reported receiving a scam message that appears to come from the company itself, but can be dangerous if you open it. Read on to find out what you should keep an eye out for in your inbox.

Some people have received emails this year promising a $100 Lowe’s gift card.

While Lowe’s does send promotional emails to millions of shoppers, there are certain messages that should raise a red flag. In the first two months of 2022, people have reported receiving emails with the name and logo of the home improvement retail chain, promising a $100 gift card to those who take a survey, Snopes reported on Feb. 9.

The fact-checking website reviewed various emails that followed this formula. According to Snopes, one message’s subject line read “You have been randomly selected!” and another’s said, “Your email has been selected!” Both emails presented a $100 Lowe’s gift card with a “CLICK HERE” link, directing users to take a “short survey” to claim the money.

If you get this type of email, don’t open it.

Unfortunately, Lowe’s isn’t actually handing out $100 gift cards in exchange for a survey. According to Snopes, these are scam emails, and if you click on the link provided in the message, you would be directed to a Russian website. “We saw the same Russian website and mailing address in a similar scam that we covered about UPS,” Snopes said.

The email also includes a mailing address in Medley, Florida, listed at the bottom, but Snopes said that this address appears to have no association with the actual Lowe’s company. “It’s unclear how the address might be related to the email scam,” the site said.

Lowe’s has warned shoppers about ongoing survey scams.

In a notice posted on the company’s official website, Lowe’s warns shoppers to be wary about scammers trying to target them through fake surveys. According to the home improvement retailer, survey scams frequently make the rounds on social media or through websites that are unaffiliated with the company—even though they are often branded to look like Lowe’s.

“Lowe’s invites customers to provide feedback through an online survey at the bottom of Lowe’s receipts. The survey can only be completed online,” the company states on its website, adding that they never offer gift cards for liking or sharing social media posts. Lowe’s also says it will never ask you to email personal information such as passwords, social security numbers, gift card numbers, or credit card numbers.

The retailer says it does not offer free gifts.

It’s not just a gift card you need to be on the lookout for, however. According to Lowe’s, shoppers are also offered other types of free gifts through spam emails, online advertising, or social media postings. “Often the free gifts are offered after completing a survey,” the company warns.

But with this similar type of scam, consumers are then asked to provide their credit card information in order to pay for the shipping costs of their “free item,” so that con artists can obtain access to their finances. “Lowe’s does not solicit consumers to complete online surveys in exchange for free gifts,” the retailer confirms on its website. If you believe you have been a victim of a free gift scam, Lowe’s recommends that you file a report with your local police and with the Internet Crime Complaint Center (ICCC).

Article by Kali Coleman for Best Life©

Source: If You Get This Message From Lowe’s, Don’t Open It, Experts Warn (msn.com)

If You Get an Email from the USPS With These 3 Words, Don’t Click on It

After ordering something online, many of us eagerly wait for the shipping info to hit our email inbox so we can track our packages from departure to arrival. But don’t let your excitement get the best of you. Not every email that appears to be sent from the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) is what it seems. In fact, scammers will often target people’s inboxes with fake messages claiming to be from the USPS. And while these notices can come in all shapes and sizes, the agency says one tell-tale sign that you’re being deceived is the presence of three specific words in the subject line.

While you can receive legitimate email correspondence from the USPS, the U.S. Postal Inspection Service (USPIS)—the Postal Service’s legal arm—says it is “aware of the circulation” of fake emails claiming to be from the agency. According to a Jan. 7 update on the USPIS website, some customers have been receiving fraudulent messages in their email inbox that include these three words in the subject line: “Delivery Failure Notification.”

“If you ever receive an email about a package delivery or unpaid online postage charges, be careful,” the USPIS states on its website. “These emails appear to be from the U.S. Postal Service and include language regarding an unsuccessful attempt to deliver a package.”

This specific scam targets individuals in their email inbox by sending a message that indicates their package could not be delivered to their residence by the Postal Service, according to the Identity Theft Resource Center. “The fake notification instructs the recipient to click on a link within the email in order to ‘print a delivery label and pick up the package at their local post office,'” the organizations explains on its website. “Unfortunately, victims of this scam who click on the link expose their computer to a virus that steals personal information.”

This scam might evolve with minor changes over time, but in one of the latest versions, the link will take email users to a website that looks like a USPS website and instructs them to re-enter their address and a payment card for a $3 fee to reship their package. “All of the footer information is from USPS and takes people back to the legitimate USPS website,” the organizations warns.

The USPS will not send certain things via email.

While you might receive shipping email updates from the USPS, officials warn that the agency will not notify you about a delivery failure through your email inbox. “Be aware that the U.S. Postal Service does not notify customers of package delivery attempts, or request personal information, via email,” the USPIS explains on its website.

If a mail carrier cannot deliver your package, they will likely leave you a Redelivery Notice on your front door or in your mailbox. “This form provides the customer with information on the type of mailpiece that was attempted by the carrier, why the mailpiece was not left, and which delivery options are available. It provides the customer with options and information they need to either request a redelivery or pick up their mailpiece at the Post Office,” the USPS explains.

There are other noticeable signs of fake USPS emails.

These three words are not the only sign of a fake USPS email. According to the Postal Service’s legal branch, many fraudulent messages also include poor grammar and spelling errors. Urgent emails are also likely fake. “If the email requests ‘immediate action,’ it could be a scam,” USPIS says.

The agency asks that you report any potential scam messages so that they can continue tracking how they evolve over time. “If you receive an email about a package delivery failure, forward it to spam@uspis.gov, then delete the email,” the USPIS advises.

This article written by Kali Coleman for Best Life©

Source: If You Get an Email From the USPS With These 3 Words, Don’t Click on It (msn.com)

Pet poodle killed by neighbor’s dog on Far South Side, owner cited

A few days ago. I posted an article about the deadliest dog breed to own. This is the dog breed that’s attacked the most people – TUTORING YOU

Based on the number of deaths attributed to this breed (421), the Pit Bull is by far the deadliest dog to own. I don’t have the number of other dog breeds that have been killed or injured by this breed, however it happens more frequently than attacks on humans. Here is a report on the latest attack from ABC 7 news:

“Cynthia Bailey said when she let her toy poodle Caeser out around 6 a.m. Tuesday, a neighbor’s dog was in her yard.

She said that dog attacked Caesar once, then came back after him again.

Baily said she tried to fight off the dog, but Caesar died from his injuries.

“I’m screaming and yelling for help, but he’s just constantly attacking, you know, my dog,” Baily said. “Nothing I did touched him. He didn’t flicker at all.”

The owner of the pitbull, cane corso mix told officers the dog had gotten out of the house.

The owner was cited, according to police.”

Just to reiterate, got kids? Beware of this breed!

Nice doggy!

This is the dog breed that’s attacked the most people

Got kids? Careful with this particular dog breed.

Slide 23 of 23: Attacks doing bodily harm (1982-2018): 5,994 (166.5 per year) Deaths (1982-2018): 421  Pit bulls have a fearsome reputation, but they’re not natural fighters like some people think. "Pit bull” refers to a variety of breeds, which inevitably means these dogs are regularly misidentified by shelters and news outlets. Statistics around their dangerousness are therefore almost impossible to compare with those for more universally defined breeds. Some pit bulls may be aggressive due to genetics and training, but these dogs are generally intelligent, gentle, and extremely loving dogs when owned by those who know how to handle their rambunctious nature.
@ pixaby

#1. Pit bull

Attacks doing bodily harm (1982-2018): 5,994 (166.5 per year)
Deaths (1982-2018): 421

Pit bulls have a fearsome reputation, but they’re not natural fighters like some people think. “Pit bull” refers to a variety of breeds, which inevitably means these dogs are regularly misidentified by shelters and news outlets. Statistics around their dangerousness are therefore almost impossible to compare with those for more universally defined breeds. Some pit bulls may be aggressive due to genetics and training, but these dogs are generally intelligent, gentle, and extremely loving dogs when owned by those who know how to handle their rambunctious nature.

Enough said. Compare it to one of the safest breeds:

Slide 5 of 23: Attacks doing bodily harm (1982-2018): 15 (less than 1 per year) Deaths (1982-2018): 3 Golden retrievers are even-tempered, energetic, friendly with everyone, and easy to train, making them a perfect family pet. They’ve been one of the most popular dog breeds in America since they were introduced around the early 1900s, but they didn’t really take off until Gerald Ford’s golden retriever Liberty occupied the White House in the 1970s.

#19. Golden retriever

Attacks doing bodily harm (1982-2018): 15 (less than 1 per year)
Deaths (1982-2018): 3

Golden retrievers are even-tempered, energetic, friendly with everyone, and easy to train, making them a perfect family pet. They’ve been one of the most popular dog breeds in America since they were introduced around the early 1900s, but they didn’t really take off until Gerald Ford’s golden retriever Liberty occupied the White House in the 1970s.

When my hometown media reports of a death due to a dog attack, I expect that breed to be a Pit Bull. Yet, some people swear by them. Go figure.

Source: Isabel Sepulveda  for Stacker.com

5 essential things to do to prepare for a snowstorm

By Jean Levasseur  for Reviewed©

© Getty Images / PavelRodimov 

Winter storms happen every year, and yet the first one can still catch us by surprise. With the cold weather and snow comes power outages, car accidents, and other problems.

By taking a few simple steps ahead of the first winter storm, you can stay warm and safe while enjoying all the fun things that snowy weather has to offer.

Winter-proof your house

Your house is your number one protection against the cold weather, so you’ve got to make sure that it’s sealed up tight. There are a few steps you should take every year before winter comes.

First, make sure that your heating system is up and running. Don’t wait for the first 10-degree day to turn it on. Run your furnace early in the fall for a few hours, and, if needed, have it tuned up, its filters changed, and its chimneys cleaned. If you use oil heat, fill your tank before the heating system starts.

Go around your house and make sure all of your insulation is intact, particularly around windows and doors.

Also check your water lines. Make sure that they are all insulated properly, and that you shut off the water leading to your hose and drain those pipes. If you have a sprinkler or irrigation system, drain the lines and shut that water off as well. A burst pipe is a terrible thing anytime of year, but can be particularly damaging if it freezes.

Bring in your outdoor furniture. Most of it isn’t going to be designed to stand up to the rigors of winter. The weight of the snow can make the fabric and springs sage, and the cold can be damaging as well.

Lastly, prune away any dead branches and have dead trees removed from your property. The weight of the ice and snow, accompanied by the wind from winter storms, can rip down even healthy limbs and trees. By clearing out the dead ones, you’re reducing the chances of them falling on power lines, your house, or even worse, a person.

Ready your equipment for snow

The morning after a 16-inch snowfall is not the time to discover that your snowblower won’t start, or that you don’t know where your snow shovels or ice melt are. Proper prep for a snowstorm in advance can make your snow clearing easier, faster, and less backbreaking.

Well before the first snowstorm headlines a weather forecast, dust off your snow blower, start it up, and then run it for a while. Have it tuned up in the fall so that you know it is ready to go.

If you have a generator, the same rules apply. Make sure it runs, that the wiring hooks up properly, and that you have plenty of gas on hand—enough to run the generator (and your snowblower) for at least several days in the event of a power outage. More than likely, a five gallon container won’t be enough.

The night before it snows, bring all of your tools to where they’re needed. It’s frustrating to have to trudge through thigh-high snow to the shed to get a shovel, so leave it by the door so that it’s right there when you go out to clear. Same goes for ice melt.

Move your snowblower to a place where you can just drive it out, rather than having to muscle and drag it around. And, if your house is prone to ice dams, don’t forget to get your roof rake out—clearing the snow from the bottom few feet of your roof is the best way to stop ice dams from ever forming.

Prep your car for winter roads

Let’s face it—at some point this winter, you’ll have to drive somewhere on a snowy day. While snow and cars can increase the dangers of driving, some basic preparations in advance can keep you safe, even when you have to be on the roads.

It’s a good idea to take care of any lingering maintenance issues before winter starts. Get your fluids changed if needed, swap out your windshield washer fluid for one that de-ices, and make sure that your wipers are in good shape. Double check that your heater works, and that your battery holds a charge.

Make sure your tires are up to snuff. Just because they passed inspection doesn’t mean they’re great for the winter. If you use snow tires, change them over well before the first snowfall.

If you don’t own snow tires, check the tire treads on your regular wheels. If they’re balding or wearing unevenly, it may be time to get new ones. Any tire can slip on snow or ice, but tires with enough tread will slip less and regain traction faster.

Also make sure to check your tires’ air pressure—improperly inflated tires are more likely to slip as well.

Transfer your snow-removal equipment into the car before it snows. You don’t want to come out of a store or work and discover that you don’t have your snow brush in the car when there’s already six inches of snow on your windshield.

A snow brush may not be enough. Always have a shovel in your car as well, just in case you need to dig out. A bag of kitty litter or sand provides traction under your wheels in case you get stuck.

An important and easy task is to fill your gas tank before every storm. You sure don’t want to run out of gas in the middle of a blizzard.

Lastly, keep an emergency kit in your car. This should include everything you’d need if you got stranded and had to stay with your car for hours. This kit should include:

  • Blankets
  • Flashlight and batteries
  • Cell phone chargers
  • Food and water
  • Maps and a compass
  • Sand or kitty litter for traction
  • A first aid kit
  • Jumper cables and tire-changing equipment

Expect a power outage

Unfortunately, power outages are a part of winter for many of us. While most tend to be short, you need to prepare for the chance that one may last days or weeks

If you have a generator, make sure that it works and that you have plenty of gas. Also have some way of securing it in place to prevent theft. Most importantly, practice generator safety and place it away from your house—generators give off toxic carbon monoxide, and you don’t want it seeping into your home.

Know where your flashlights are, and make sure that they all have fully-charged batteries. You want to have several flashlights available, and at least one in each bedroom.

Prepare like you would for any emergency situation. Keep a supply of non-perishable food and water on hand. The food in your refrigerator can keep for a short time in a power outage, but only if you don’t keep opening the door. If you have a chock-full fridge, but aren’t sure if it’s safe to eat after the power comes back on, try this trick—but prepare for it ahead of time.

Keep a spare propane tank for your grill. This way, if you lose power for several days, you’ll still have a way to cook food and boil water, if necessary.

While you want your food to be cold, you yourself want to be warm during a storm—obviously. If you have a working fireplace and/or wood stove in your home, stock enough wood inside or by your door to last through the duration of the storm, and then some. A fire can be the difference between a comfortable night’s sleep and a frigid one. That said, if you do not have a working fireplace or wood stove you should never light a fire for warmth inside your home. That is an easy way to either get carbon monoxide poisoning or light your house on fire.

Know where your extra blankets and warm clothes are. If an outage goes on for days, it’s going to get chilly, and you want to make sure that you can stay warm without having to rummage through a few dozen attic boxes to find the sleeping bags.

Finally, have a backup plan. While you probably shouldn’t try to travel in the middle of the storm, know where you can go if the power is going to be out for an extended period of time.

Don’t forget that winter can be fun

Winter and snow aren’t all bad, and many of us live in colder climates because we enjoy the beauty and activities that winter has to offer.

By prepping for fun activities early in the season, you can make the most of the cold, snowy weather. Pull out the sleds before the storm comes. Get your skis or snowboards edged and waxed in advance. Dig out your ice fishing equipment or snowshoes.

And, if you’re one of those who really doesn’t like the cold or snow, then at the very least make sure you have a few good books to read while you wait for spring.

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/shopping-all/5-essential-things-to-do-to-prepare-for-a-snowstorm/ar-BB1bOsnw?ocid=msedgntp

Fire Prevention Week 2020, October 4-10

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week for more than 95 years, has announced “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen” as the theme for Fire Prevention Week, October 4-10, 2020. NFPA’s focus on cooking fire safety comes in response to home cooking fires representing the leading cause of U.S. home fires, with nearly half (49 percent) of all home fires involving cooking equipment; unattended cooking is the leading cause of these fires.

“Cooking continues to be a major contributor to the home fire problem,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA vice president of Outreach and Advocacy. “The good news is that the vast majority of these fires are highly preventable. This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign works to better educate the public about where potential cooking hazards exist and basic but critical ways to prevent them.”

Carli notes that this year’s focus on cooking safety is particularly timely. “As the public may continue to avoid restaurants for some time and opt instead to do more cooking and entertaining at home, the potential for home cooking fires will likely increase as well.”

Key messages around this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen” will include the following:

  • Keep a close eye on what you’re cooking; never leave cooking unattended
  • Keep anything that can catch fire — oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains — at least three feet away from your stovetop.
  • Be on alert. If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or stovetop.

For more information about Fire Prevention Week and this year’s theme, “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen,”along with a wealth of resources to help promote the campaign locally, visit fpw.org.

About Fire Prevention Week

NFPA has been the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week since 1922. According to the National Archives and Records Administration’s Library Information Center, Fire Prevention Week is the longest running public health and safety observance on record. The President of the United States has signed a proclamation declaring a national observance during that week every year since 1925. Visit www.firepreventionweek.org for more safety information.

10 Things You Should Never Burn in Your Fireplace

Slide 1 of 10: Burning high moisture-content wood in your fireplace produces more smoke than seasoned wood. This, in turn, can cause dangerous creosote to build up on the walls of your chimney. Burn only dry wood. Be sure you always check your chimney before using your fireplace.

© GRANATA68/SHUTTERSTOCK

Wet wood damages a fireplace

Burning high moisture-content wood in your fireplace produces more smoke than seasoned wood. This, in turn, can cause dangerous creosote to build up on the walls of your chimney. Burn only dry wood. Be sure you always check your chimney before using your fireplace.

Some plants

It may be tempting to throw dried up plants in the fireplace—they’re kind of like firewood, right? Well, the smoke from some plants, such as poison ivy, poison sumac, and poison oak can cause an allergic reaction when burned and inhaled. Leave all plant matter outside.

Painted or treated wood

Because burning painted and treated wood can release dangerous, toxic chemicals into your home, keep them out of your fireplace. Not only can these chemicals irritate lungs, eyes, and skin, but they can damage the inside of your fireplace. FYI: Never mount your TV above your fireplace.

Christmas trees

It seems logical that you could get rid of your old Christmas tree in the fireplace, but it’s best to dispose of it by other means. Not only is the wood not properly seasoned, evergreen trees often contain high levels of quick-burning resin which can reach high temperatures and result in a chimney fire or even crack your chimney.

Slide 5 of 10: It doesn't matter what type of plastic you have—plastic bags, bubble wrap, plastic bottles, or cartons—never throw it in the fireplace. When burned, plastic releases harmful chemicals that can be dangerous for your health. Or, try to reduce your plastic consumption entirely—it's one of the tiny ways you can make a difference to help the environment.

© TEERASAK LADNONGKHUN/SHUTTERSTOCK

Plastic

It doesn’t matter what type of plastic you have—plastic bags, bubble wrap, plastic bottles, or cartons—never throw it in the fireplace. When burned, plastic releases harmful chemicals that can be dangerous for your health. Or, try to reduce your plastic consumption entirely.

Some papers and cardboard

It may be tempting to toss old papers, wrapping paper, or that cardboard pizza box in the fireplace, but you should dispose of paper and cardboard with colored print another way (though, make sure you check if you can recycle these things—because many times, you can’t). The brightly colored inks may release toxic gasses when burned.

Charcoal products

While you may use charcoal products in your barbecue grill, keep them outdoors. When you burn charcoal, it releases carbon monoxide into the air, and that’s the last thing you want inside your home.

Dryer lint

While dryer lint may work as a great fire starter when you’re on a camping trip, keep it out of your fireplace. The synthetic fibers in dryer lint can release dangerous chemical fumes into your home and chimney. Choose a healthier way to ignite your fire.

Driftwood

That large piece of driftwood you found on the coast may seem like a good choice for firewood, but it can potentially release salt and thus corrode your fireplace and chimney. Leave driftwood to its best use: a decoration.

Fire accelerants

Never use fire accelerants such as gasoline, grill starter fluid, or kerosene to start a fire. These highly flammable liquids can cause a fire that quickly becomes too hot for your fireplace and chimney, putting the integrity of your chimney and your home at risk. It’s best to keep these accelerants out of your home.

Article for Reader’s Digest by Rachel Brougham

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/home-and-garden/10-things-you-should-never-burn-in-your-fireplace/ss-BB189Gzn?ocid=msedgntp#image=10

9 Things You Shouldn’t Post Online When You’re Not Home

Slide 1 of 9: "Finally going to Italy May 10-29!" you might caption an Instagram or Facebook photo months in advance. If your social media platforms are public, you're giving plenty of strangers the opportunity to plan for a break-in. And even if they're not, an acquaintance might mention it, with the information getting in the wrong hands. For your next vacation, make sure you do these important things before you go to keep your home safe.

© Westend61/Getty Images

Don’t announce your plans online

“Finally going to Italy May 10-29!” you might caption an Instagram or Facebook photo months in advance. If your social media platforms are public, you’re giving plenty of strangers the opportunity to plan for a break-in. And even if they’re not, an acquaintance might mention it, with the information getting in the wrong hands.

Slide 2 of 9: While you're on vacation, occasionally post ambiguous images of you or your family and friends at your home to throw off any potential burglars following you on social media. Check out these other great tips to fool burglars and make it look like you're home.

© oran Bogicevic/Shutterstock

Solution 1: Post old photos

While you’re on vacation, occasionally post ambiguous images of you or your family and friends at your home to throw off any potential burglars following you on social media.

Solution 2: Post photos of your house sitter

If you absolutely must post photos of your trip, or are required to do it for work (such as lifestyle blogging), then a good way to keep the burglars away is to post sporadic photos of your home, pets, and even house sitter. You can post captions like, “So grateful we have a wonderful house sitter watching over our home for the next week!” 

Solution 3: Get on a neighborhood app

Finally, there’s a perk to all your nosy neighbors! If you have an app like Nextdoor, the free private social media network for your neighborhood community, you can keep a lookout for any lurkers in your area, since people post suspicious activity all the time. If anything comes up, you should have a select few trusted sources to keep an eye out for your vacant home.

Log out of your accounts

Log out of your personal accounts on your computers at home, ensuring you have a protective password. Personal information on there could relay your travel plans, or give people passwords to safes and more in the home. You should also log out of your personal social media accounts on any public computers you use while traveling.

Disable location settings

Have you ever noticed that, when on Facebook, a little bar pops up on your Newsfeed that shows you where people are traveling? It can show people traveling simply an hour away for the day, or off to another country. Do you really want people to know this information about you … ever? Especially while on vacation, it’s best to disable your location settings on all your social media channels.

Only accept friend requests from friends

Your social life might have your friend requests on social media skyrocketing, but be careful not to accept people who you don’t genuinely know. Not everyone has the best of intentions, and someone who you met through a friend of a friend very briefly could come across your personal life and track down your home. 

Enable two-factor authentication

If you are posting your travels merely with trusted friends in private messages on your social media platforms, you should be sure no one else can access your account. That means enabling two-factor authentication on your social media platforms. With this, no one on another computer, phone, etc., can access your account just because they know your password, as the platform will recognize it’s a new device and send your phone a notification.

Get your kids on board

You may put in all the work to ensure your social media doesn’t relay your vacation information but are your kids playing along? You’ll want to make sure you go through all of these steps with them to be safe.

Great article by Alexa Erickson  for the Reader’s Digest

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/smart-living/9-things-you-shouldn-t-post-online-when-you-re-not-home/ss-BB186DH0?ocid=msedgntp#image=1

Facebook Scams You Need to Take Seriously

A healthy dose of skepticism

Facebook can be a wonderful place full of opportunities to learn new things, share the special moments in your life, and reconnect with old friends. While Facebook is a lighthearted site for sharing, liking, and commenting, it is also one of the most common places for scams and fraud on the Internet. Unfortunately, while you’re sharing your life with friends and family, you might be unintentionally sharing private information with those who wish to do you harm.

On the bright side, there are ways to protect yourself against the nefarious and sometimes quite believable scams. More and more scams are being exposed every day and each new scam is more clever and less detectable than the last. As a rule of thumb, remember to do your own research, never click on suspicious links, and distrust sites asking you to enter personal information.

Slide 5 of 18: Your friend just found out what ‘80s pop star is their spirit animal and now you can’t wait to find out either. Don’t let your curiosity get the better of you, though. Some Facebook quizzes will ask for access to your profile, and others will even go a step further by throwing certain questions into the quiz itself, says Adam Levin, founder of global identity protection and data risk services firm CyberScout and author of Swiped. “They’re purely to gather information because … they could be the answers to security questions,” he says. Only take quizzes on sites you know and trust, and create fake answers for password recovery questions so they’re hard to crack, says Levin. It might be easy enough for Facebook scams to figure out your mother’s maiden name, so leave an easy-to-remember lie instead.

© mirtmirt/Shutterstock

Taking quizzes

Your friend just found out what ‘80s pop star is their spirit animal and now you can’t wait to find out either. Don’t let your curiosity get the better of you, though. Some Facebook quizzes will ask for access to your profile, and others will even go a step further by throwing certain questions into the quiz itself, says Adam Levin, founder of global identity protection and data risk services firm CyberScout and author of Swiped. “They’re purely to gather information because … they could be the answers to security questions,” he says. Only take quizzes on sites you know and trust, and create fake answers for password recovery questions so they’re hard to crack, says Levin. It might be easy enough for Facebook scams to figure out your mother’s maiden name, so leave an easy-to-remember lie instead.

Insane giveaways

Free iPad giveaway? Sign me up! But wait—before you click that sweepstakes link, ask yourself whether it seems real, says Eva Velasquez, CEO and president of Identity Theft Resource Center. “Yes, there are legitimate sweepstakes and raffles and giveaways, but there’s usually an end goal there,” she says. Most companies are hoping the promise of a free iPad (or flight or jewelry) will entice you enough to, say, sign up for a newsletter or buy a product. Before you give any personal information to a company, weigh the chances of winning with what you’ll lose giving up personal information. 

The “new” old friend

Be skeptical if you receive a friend request from someone you could have sworn already had a Facebook page. Sure, some people like to clean house by ditching their old profiles, but other friend requests aren’t so innocent. Scammers will clone a person’s entire Facebook profile, creating a fake profile of a real person. From your “friend’s” page, the hacker could send a link for a get-rich-quick scheme or a cute quote. It’s the kind of thing you’d ignore from an anonymous email message, but not from a loyal friend. “They’re banking on the fact that you will trust the message,” says Levin. The problem is, clicking that link could add malware to your computer. Before you accept a weird friend request, shoot over a text or call the person to confirm it’s not a fake account.

A friend’s strange request

Even if you haven’t received a new request, don’t immediately trust a message from a friend you can’t see face-to-face. Hackers can find a person’s password and break into their account, then message their friends. The person might claim to have lost their wallet in Europe and ask you to send money. It might sound obvious enough now that it’s a scam, but those messages could tap into your fear so you don’t think straight. If you’re wondering if your “friend” is who you think it is, get in touch on a platform other than Facebook. Ringtones sound different in America than in other countries, so you’ll be able to figure out if you’re friend is traveling, even if they don’t pick up the phone, says Levin. Still not sure? Again, get in touch off of Facebook to find out what’s going on. 

Gossipmongers

Whether you know the person who posted it or not, you might go into panic mode when someone leaves you a message warning, “OMG look what they’re saying about you” and click the link to find out what’s going on. “It’s really about engaging your curiosity and getting your curious nature to say, ‘I want to know,’” says Velasquez. But don’t click! A vague message (“Did you see this picture of you?” vs “LOL at your face eating cake at Sam’s party last weekend”) is suspect, and clicking it could load malware onto your computer, says Velasquez. Text your friend to confirm the link is real.

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Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/other/17-facebook-scams-you-need-to-take-seriously/ss-BB17fNTj?ocid=msedgntp#image=1