The Florida Keys & Key West

If you’re looking for an effortless domestic getaway with international appeal, this southernmost U.S. island chain holds the keys.

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Who couldn’t use a little escape these days? Few destinations suit the current moment better than the Florida Keys. Easy to get to by road or air, this uniquely American island paradise offers 365 days of practically perfect subtropical weather, a vast array of outdoor activities on land and water, and a wealth of authentic experiences across five distinct districts—no passport required.

The northernmost island in the Keys, Key Largo may look and feel like the Caribbean, but it’s only about an hour’s drive from South Florida’s two major airports. You might know its name from the classic Humphrey Bogart film, or you may know its reputation as the Diving Capital of the World. Either way, it’s a fitting place to take the plunge into the Keys.

With the only living coral barrier reef in the continental U.S. just off its eastern shores, Key Largo was destined to adopt diving as a way of life. Visitors can become scuba certified in only three days, learning with some of the world’s best instructors—then practice their skills in the brilliant undersea world at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, the country’s first underwater nature preserve. More advanced divers will want to explore the wreck of the Spiegel Grove, a U.S. Navy ship that was intentionally scuttled in 2002 to create a new reef system. At 510 feet, it’s larger than any natural reef structure in the Keys and a spectacular introduction to the Florida Keys Shipwreck Trail. But if you prefer your adventures on land—or in shallower waters—take heart: Key Largo is also flanked by Everglades National Park, a natural wonderland for hikers, birders, kayakers, and eco-tourists of all stripes.

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Islamorada translated from Spanish as “purple isle,” has yet another name among sport fishing enthusiasts: heaven. Its unique location, between the “backcountry” of the Florida Bay and the “front side” of the Atlantic Ocean, provides an unrivaled diversity of fishing opportunities. Seasonal visiting species like sailfish, marlin, and tuna are brought in by the Gulf Stream; tarpon and bonefish are among the treasures to be found in the backcountry, with catch-and-release and other responsible practices fully observed. If you’re an angling newbie or just not sure where to start, you’ll find a host of charters available, with tournament-grade captains and experienced guides ready to show you the way.

Take your catch to any number of local restaurants, like Islamorada Fish Company, where they will be happy to cook it to perfection. Or if you’ve spent the day kiteboarding, paddleboarding, or kayaking, just take your appetite. Grab a seat at a dockside eatery or on an outdoor patio at sunset. You’ll want to sample all of the local delicacies—especially the succulent stone crabs, in season from mid-October through mid-May. (Key lime pie is always in season.)

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Midway through the Keys and sandwiched between the waters of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico, Marathon is a boater’s paradise and a restless family’s dream. Whether you’re cruising in on your own vessel or renting one while you’re here, this is one of the Keys’ most boat-friendly destinations, with a jewel of a marina and a rich seafaring history.

By water or via the historic Seven Mile Bridge, make your way to Pigeon Key, the tiny island that served as home for workers building the Florida Keys Over-Sea Railroad in the early 20th century; it’s a great spot for picnics, historical tours, and easy snorkeling. Families can also immerse themselves in Marathon’s world-class marine education programs, whether by enjoying close encounters with loggerheads, hawksbills, and their brethren at the Turtle Hospital—the world’s first licensed veterinary center for endangered sea turtles—or swimming and playing with dolphins at the Dolphin Research Center. Florida Keys Aquarium Encounters is unlike any other aquarium experience, with opportunities for visitors of all ages to engage with the aquatic world through touch tanks, feeding experiences, and snorkeling encounters designed to inspire the next generation of marine conservationists.

Big Pine Key & Florida’s Lower Keys are a string of small islands best known for their abundance of natural wonders, including two national wildlife refuges and a national marine sanctuary. The names of these idyllic keys hint at their quirky, irresistible appeal: Big Pine, Little Duck, Sunshine, Summerland, Sugarloaf—and the list goes on. But charming names are only the beginning. The “Natural Keys” will capture your heart and take your breath away with adventures in the wild, both on land and on (or under) the water.

One of the most remarkable creatures you’ll encounter here is the Key deer, a diminutive subspecies of whitetail found nowhere else on earth. These carefully protected beauties roam free throughout Lower Keys, but especially on Big Pine—home to the National Key Deer Refuge, where you can spot them on guided walks, bike rides, and kayak excursions. Just east of Big Pine Key lies Bahia Honda State Park, one of the most beloved beach destinations in the country. The park encompasses more than 500 pristine acres, including an offshore island, and snorkelers can explore the Looe Key National Marine Sanctuary, one of the most glorious reefs in the Keys. Just before you hit Key West, pay a visit to Stock Island, an up-and-coming resort destination with a colorful history as the hub of the Keys’ shrimping industry and a vibrant community of young artists.

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Celebrated for its flamboyant personality and anything-goes spirit, Key West also has a softer side. Those who come for the party scene and colorful characters won’t be disappointed—but history buffs, nature lovers, and sporty types should prepare to fall in love, too. This island has captured the imaginations of countless artists and writers, including Ernest Hemingway, Tennessee Williams, and Winslow Homer. And if it seems unlikely that the same small patch of land could provide inspiration for “Margaritaville” balladeer Jimmy Buffett and poet laureate Robert Frost, just wait. Once you get to know Key West, it won’t seem surprising at all.

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In addition to literary landmarks like the Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum, Key West’s historical sites include Harry S. Truman’s Little White House, where the 33rd President took respite during the winter months. Who could blame him, when the sea beckons from every direction, and water and air temperatures are nothing short of perfect? Do what Truman would do: hop a charter for some of the best sportfishing you’ll find anywhere. Leisurely cruising is always an option, too, whether on a catamaran charter or paddling a kayak along one of the island’s peaceful waterways. And when you’ve worked up an appetite, take your pick from a feast of outdoor dining venues, from spacious porches to candlelit seaside lawns.

Dedicate a day—or more—to shopping; from antiques to handcrafted jewelry, clothing, and works of art, Key West is brimming with one-of-a-kind boutiques reflecting its irrepressible personality. Now more than ever, it feels great to support small local businesses, and you’ll find no shortage of eclectic mom-and-pop stores and enterprises throughout the Florida Keys & Key West. From signature, Cuban coffee shops to family-run eco-tours to distinctive home goods and so much more, shopping mom-and-pop in the Keys is a lot like exploring the reefs and nature preserves: you get to discover all sorts of treasures while doing your part to support the ecosystem.

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Think of the Florida Keys as the world-class destination that happens to be right in your own backyard—with all of the superb accommodations you would expect to find there. From family-run properties to luxurious resort hotels and rentals, all are observing stringent cleanliness protocols to ensure travelers’ health and safety during this time of Covid-19. Always a pioneer in the realm of sustainability, the Keys continue to lead in another area of responsible tourism: social distancing and masks are respectfully enforced throughout the destination. And dining establishments throughout the region—now more than ever—offer outdoor seating, waterfront dining, and convenient takeout options.

Source: https://www.cntraveler.com/sponsored/story/timeless-and-timelier-than-ever-the-florida-keys?mvt=i&mvn=e171f4ee6fb64cd0817a4f6812a2ad76&mvp=NA-ARCHDIGE-11238832&mvl=Key-river%20%5BVerso%20Homepage%20River%5D

Road Trip: The Most Historic Small Towns in the U.S.

By Jessie Fetterling for Far & Wide

@iwillbikerideforchocolate / Discover Bisbee/Facebook

We know travel plans are impacted right now. But to fulfill your wanderlust, we’ll continue to share stories that can inspire your next adventure.

The U.S. is filled with fascinating small towns that each have their own unique story to tell. Havens for artsy free spirits. Mining sites that once yielded a ton of gold. Sites of infamous military battles. Stomping grounds of storied pirates.

These small towns offer history buffs a glimpse into our nation’s past, while also remaining just as relevant today as they were years ago. Learn the histories of these small towns, and plan a visit that will encourage you to travel back in time.

Los Alamos, New Mexico

Population: 12,019

What was once a secret military town is now the fifth-fastest-growing city in the state. Its claim to fame is what’s now called the Los Alamos National Laboratory, operated by the Department of Energy. 

This was the creation site of the world’s first atomic bomb as part of the infamous Manhattan Project. During World War II, all incoming truckloads to the area were mislabeled, and it wasn’t revealed until after the bombing of Hiroshima what residents here were really up to.

What to Do

History buffs will want to head straight to Manhattan Project National Historical Park, where you can tour the Manhattan Project’s historic Los Alamos site and the lab’s Bradbury Science Museum. Visitors can engage in the museum’s more than 40 interactive exhibits.

Long before physicists moved to the area, though, the four mesas of the Pajarito Plateau (on which the town sits) was home to Puebloans, and you can visit ruins of their cliff dwellings at Bandelier National Monument. Climb ladders and visit small carved rooms at this archaeological site that features more than 70 miles of trails.

Beaufort, North Carolina

Population: 4,452

Beaufort was established in 1709, making its historic district alone worth visiting because several buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

But this town is one with a pirate history. In fact, it’s where Blackbeard spent most of his days, and in 1996, an archaeological crew found the remains of his flagship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, in what is now called Beaufort Inlet. Blackbeard ran the ship aground in May 1718.

What to Do

For all things Blackbeard, a stop at the North Carolina Maritime Museum is a must. It features all the artifacts found from Blackbeard’s flagship.

The small town’s Old Burying Ground is equally intriguing, with graves that date back 300 years, including one of a child who died at sea and was buried in a keg of rum.

Sitka, Alaska

Population: 8,493 

With 22 buildings and sites on the National Register of Historic Places, Sitka is another small town with history to boot. Its name comes from “sheet-ka,” which means “people on the outside of Baranof Island” to the Tlingit people who settled here more than 10,000 years ago. 

When Russian explorers took over the area in 1804 after winning the Battle of Sitka against the native people, the town was designated the capital of Russian America.

What to Do

The 107-acre Sitka National Historical Park interprets the famous battle between the Russians and Tlingit people and features artifacts from the two groups. It also features a collection of Haida and Tlingit totem poles moved from the Louisiana Exposition in St. Louis.

This being Alaska, there is also plenty to do in terms of outdoor activities, from fly fishing to kayaking to wildlife boat tours that will get you up close and personal with the area’s majestic humpback whales.

Columbia, California

Population: 2,297

If only Columbia was as fruitful as it was during its heyday! From 1850 to the early 1900s, $150 million in gold was mined here, earning it the nickname, “Gem of the Southern Mines.”

What was once California’s second-largest city is now home to a few thousand residents who keep its gold rush charm very much alive.

What to Do

Columbia State Historic Park is a living gold rush town and is home to California’s largest single collection of existing structures from this era. Visitors can pan for gold, ride the stagecoach and explore exhibits that tell the history of the California gold rush.

Better yet, a visit to this historic town is free, but you’ll likely want to purchase some sweets at the authentic ice cream parlor or order a pint at the local saloon.

Woodstock, New York

Population: 5,823

Believe it or not, the epic Woodstock music festival that attracted some 400,000 people to the area for “three days of peace and music” was not held in Woodstock, New York. It was actually held about 60 miles away at Max Yasgur’s dairy farm in Bethel, New York. 

Festival organizers originally wanted to host the concert just across the Woodstock town line in Saugerties, where a series of Woodstock Sound-Outs concerts had been held years prior, earning the area a reputation as a popular summer art colony. But the town wouldn’t approve a permit. Whether or not the festival was actually held here, though, the name stuck, and music and art remain ever-popular here.

What to Do

A stroll down Tinker Street will take you back to the town’s bohemian roots, where quirky mom-and-pop shops sell crystals and Tibetan trinkets to visitors. There’s also a handmade candle shop, indie bookstore and a place where you can get tarot card readings. And don’t miss the Mower’s Flea Market or Woodstock Farm Festival held weekly during the summer and fall seasons.

Of course, the town is also filled with art galleries and music venues, such as Levon Helm Studios, where you can check out local acts. In the summer, the Maverick Concerts series, founded in 1916, takes place in a rustic concert hall in the woods, where the acoustics are exceptional.

Deadwood, South Dakota

Population: 1,293

Gold, prostitution, gunslingers — you name it, Deadwood had it in spades in the late 1800s. In fact, the settlement of Deadwood itself began illegally because the land was originally granted to the Lakota people in 1868. By 1874, however, Colonel George Armstrong Custer brought people here as part of the Black Hills Gold Rush. And by 1876, there were more than 25,000 people in this lawless community where murder was commonplace.

Even gun showman Wild Bill Hickock was killed here, and he and his associate, Calamity Jane, are buried in Mount Moriah Cemetery, which is open to visitors.

What to Do

Looking to get a taste of the Deadwood experience? The entire city is designated a National Historic Landmark District because of its well-preserved architecture.

But the Days of ’76 Museum features more than 50 historic wagons, stagecoaches, firearms, clothing and other memorabilia that celebrates the town’s early pioneering days. Or you can experience those early days first-hand via the 1876 Mystery Dinner Theater, where you can help solve a murder.

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Population: 7,724

This small town needs little introduction to history buffs, but we’d be remiss not to include it. 

After all, it’s where the Battle of Gettysburg took place in July 1863, marking a significant turning point in the Civil War and inspiring President Abraham Lincoln’s famous “Gettysburg Address” speech.

What to Do

The town’s highlight, of course, is Gettysburg National Military Park, where you can learn all about the history of the battle and even witness reenactments. You can also take walking tours to visit some of the historic churches that were used as hospitals to care for soldiers.

After a day of history, you can check out the area’s craft wine, beer, cider and spirits trail and take in the beautiful farmlands.

Well that’s all for today. I’ll post more small town America in days ahead. Be sure to check in.

Source: https://www.farandwide.com/s/small-towns-history-buffs-87d366787ee44d42

21 Mistakes Americans Make in Europe (and How to Avoid Them)

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We know travel plans are impacted right now. But to fulfill your wanderlust, we’ll continue to share stories that can inspire your next adventure.

With its fascinating history, mouth-watering food, cosmopolitan megacities and charming villages, it’s easy to see why travelers flock to Europe. There’s nothing quite like ascending the Eiffel Tower at night, sampling wine in the Tuscan countryside or strolling along Amsterdam’s canals — as long as you follow certain customs and traditions, that is!

Yes, Europe is amazing. Just make sure you understand military time and the metric system, can drive a stick shift and know better than to plug in your hairdryer. For first-time visitors, trying to figure out the continent’s nuances can lead to embarrassing or uncomfortable situations that can sour a holiday.

Thankfully, we’re here to help you learn what to do and, more importantly, what not to do. Read on to learn about some of the most common mistakes Americans make in Europe and helpful tips on how to avoid them at all costs. 

Believing You Have the Right to Go

It’s as if the European Union (EU) had been waiting for an excuse to not allow Americans into its borders. On July 1, 2020, the EU lifted its travel restriction ban (previously set in place due to the pandemic) to certain countries that they didn’t see as a threat to spreading the disease.

What country was not on that list? Yep, you guessed it. The United States.

Especially during the current climate, check all travel restrictions before booking a flight to European countries right now.

Or if you see an amazing deal you can’t refuse, make sure to book a flight that has a good cancellation policy or no flight change fee.

Assuming Everyone Speaks English

Many Europeans have made an effort to learn English, so why not return the favor? Speaking a bit of the local language can go a long way, especially if you plan on going off-the-beaten-path.

You don’t have to be fluent, but knowing key phrases like “Buon Giorno” or  “Wie geht es Ihnen” will earn you more respect than trying to communicate through drawings or awkward hand gestures.

Using Planes Instead of Trains

Europe has well-connected and extensive railways, but many travelers are tempted by budget airlines offering rock-bottom prices. 

But when you factor in the time it takes to get between the city and these airports, not to mention those long security lines before your flight, traveling by train can still be a far better use of time and money. 

Tipping

Gratuities are a great way to show your appreciation, but they aren’t necessary in Europe, where service charges are already built into a restaurant’s prices. 

Even for exceptional service, tipping an extra 10 percent is considered generous. 

Expecting Big Portions and Unlimited Beverages

Aside from wearing socks with sandals, asking for a “free refill” in Europe is one of the most embarrassing things an American tourist can do. While we love to supersize our drinks in the U.S., Europe offers more modest pours (for soda, anyway, wine and beer is a different story). 

The same applies to food, where the emphasis is put on the amount of flavor, not the size of the plate. On the bright side, you’ll have plenty of room for dessert. 

Thinking Bread and Water Are Free

Many diners assume water is free, just like at home, but when a server asks you if you want still or sparkling (or gas, depending on the country), be prepared to pay for it. 

The same goes for bread and, gasp, even the butter.  

While the charges are small, if you’re on a tight budget, it’s best to skip the sparkling and cut the carbs. 

Of course, if you’re a huge bread lover, it never hurts to do your research before. Countries like France (where eating bread is like brushing your teeth) do typically serve bread for free.

Eating American Food

We don’t blame you if you’re not into trying fermented shark, but why go all the way to Europe to only eat at McDonald’s or Kentucky Fried Chicken? 

It’d be a shame to miss those mouth-watering perogies in Poland or Spain’s famed paella. 

If you’re on a budget or simply enjoy fast food, bypass the golden arches in favor of local choices like krokets from Febo (Holland) or smoked fish from Nordsee (Germany).

Dining Near the Major Sites

Dying to see the Roman Colosseum? Fantastic, but the spaghetti and meatballs next door will likely earn a thumbs down. Want authentic fish and chips? The cafe next to Big Ben is anything but a fresh catch. 

While long lines and hours spent on your feet might prompt you to run to the first cafe you see, your meal will likely be less authentic and far more expensive than going to someplace a bit farther from the action.

For additional information, click below:

Source: https://www.farandwide.com/s/mistakes-americans-make-europe-ed4d0fddadb94cd3

The 3 biggest mistakes tourists make when visiting national parks

Article by tlakritz@insider.com (Talia Lakritz) for Insider©


A former park ranger reveals the 3 biggest mistakes tourists make when visiting national parksa young boy standing next to a body of water: Ash Nudd spent three seasons as a park ranger. Dirt In My Shoes© Dirt In My Shoes Ash Nudd spent three seasons as a park ranger.

Ash Nudd has gotten a lot of dirt in her shoes over the years, but she doesn’t seem to mind.

The Utah resident spent three seasons giving tours, teaching safety instruction courses, and even participating in search and rescue efforts as a National Park Service Ranger in three different national parks across the US. Now, she runs a blog called Dirt In My Shoes where she continues to share trip itineraries full of expert recommendations.

The CDC still recommends avoiding non-essential travel, but national parks have become a popular vacation option during the pandemic since road trips and socially distanced outdoor activities are relatively low-risk. But before you go, you should be prepared and know the do’s and don’ts.

Here are the three most common mistakes Nudd saw tourists make when visiting national parks.

Don’t wing it — plan your trip beforehand

a man standing in front of a counter: Park rangers can give you guidance, not an itinerary. Jacob W. Frank/NPS
© Jacob W. Frank/NPS  Park rangers can give you guidance, not an itinerary.

Exploring a national park requires advanced planning like any other trip. Park rangers are happy to offer guidance, but they can’t write your whole itinerary for you.

“A lot of people show up to the park thinking that they can just have a good time without making any plans,” Nudd said. “People would come up to the desk and ask, ‘What do we do now?’ It’s really important to make a good plan before you get there.”

Getting too close to wild animals isn’t worth the photo-op

a brown bear walking across a snow covered road: Wildlife has the right of way. Jacob W. Frank/NPS
© Jacob W. Frank/NPS  Wildlife has the right of way

A national park is not a zoo. People often forget that the parks and animals are, in fact, wild.

Nudd remembers one instance when a photographer crept too close to a mother and baby moose. The photographer brushed off her warnings and insisted he was fine, but Nudd could tell that the mother was getting dangerously agitated. (He lived to tell the tale.)

“I think everyone wants that Instagram-worthy photo of them when they’re there, and it can put the wildlife and the resources at risk,” she said.

Don’t stray from marked paths

a group of people standing on top of a mountain: Stay on the path. Jacob W. Frank/NPS
© Jacob W. Frank/NPS Stay on the path.

Everyone thinks they’re the only one to stray from a path and carve their own way, but millions of people visit national parks each year (327.5 million in 2019, to be exact). Wandering off a trail damages the ground around it, obscuring the real path and making it difficult for future visitors to find and follow.

“Maybe the smaller things don’t seem like as big of a deal, but if everybody did it then it would ruin the landscape,” she said. “I’d rarely see huge rule-breakers when I worked in the parks. Usually it was just the little stuff that adds up when you have millions of people there.”

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/tripideas/a-former-park-ranger-reveals-the-3-biggest-mistakes-tourists-make-when-visiting-national-parks/ar-BB17nZkg?ocid=msedgntp

Go on a (virtual) tour of Tokyo with these gorgeous photos

By Lydia Schrandt, Special to USA TODAY 10 Best

Welcome to Tokyo

Old and new collide in Tokyo, Japan’s dazzling metropolis and capital city that spreads out in seemingly endless sprawl in all directions. Take a look at some of the city’s cultural icons and hidden gems through this photo tour.

a view of a city: Tokyo skyline
© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Tokyo skyline

a view of a city at sunset: Shinjuku© Y.Shimizu/©JNTO Shinjuku

In the shadow of the mountain

On clear days, it’s possible to see Mount Fuji, Japan’s tallest peak, from many an observation deck throughout Tokyo. Here, the mountain is visible at sunset, with the Shinjuku ward in the foreground.a room with a book shelf: Kanda Used Book Street© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Kanda Used Book Street

Literary paradise

Tokyo’s Jimbocho ward is home to a cluster of universities and, therefore, a healthy demand for books. The neighborhood is now one of the largest bookshop districts on the planet, with some 200 bookstores, giving it the name Book Town. Antique books are a specialty, but you’ll find plenty of newer offerings as well.a store in a city: Shibuya Crossing© iStock / Eloi_Omella Shibuya Crossing

Shibuya Scramble

As many as 2,500 people make their way across Shibuya Crossing in Tokyo every two minutes at its busiest times, making it one of the world’s busiest intersections. People cross from all directions, giving the crosswalk the nickname “Shibuya Scramble.”a view of a city: Shibuya Scramble Square© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Shibuya Scramble Square

Tokyo from above

For the best views and photo ops of the busy Shibuya Crossing, head to the observation deck of Shibuya Scramble Square. Visitors enjoy 360-degree views of the surrounding city, including the busy pedestrian crossing.a person preparing food in a kitchen: Yakitori restaurant© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Yakitori restaurant

Eat your heart out

No trip to Tokyo would be complete without a meal of yakitori, grilled chicken skewers cooked to order over charcoal. This inexpensive dish is typically served alongside a glass of cold beer, and while many restaurants have it on the menu, it’s best to get it from a specialty shop, called a yakitori-ya.a store front at night: Harmonica Alley© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Harmonica Alley

A taste of Old Tokyo

Step back in time in Tokyo with a stroll down Harmonica Alley. This narrow warren of alleys and covered streets, illuminated by red lanterns at night, is a popular spot for after-work drinks and snacks from standing-room-only eateries.a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Takeshita-dori© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Takeshita-dori

Harajuku fashion

Spend some time wandering around Harajuku Station, and you’ll likely come face to face with Japan’s teenage fashion culture. Takeshita Street is a hub for trend-setting youth, with shops specializing in kawaii, grunge and goth fashion. Lady Gaga has even been known to shop here.a large ship in a body of water: Rainbow Bridge© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Rainbow Bridge

Colorful crossing

Like many of the world’s great cities, Tokyo has its own iconic bridge, the Rainbow Bridge linking Odaiba and Shibaura Pier. Once the sun goes down, the bridge lights up with solar-powered, multi-hued lights. Both cars and pedestrians can cross the bridge; it takes about 30 minutes on foot.a large tower that has a bridge over a body of water: Statue of Liberty© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Statue of Liberty

Japan’s Statue of Liberty

Visitors to Tokyo might be surprised to see an icon much more closely associated with the United States. A smaller replica of the Statue of Liberty sits along the waterfront in Odaiba. It’s only 40 feet tall — about a seventh the size of its U.S. counterpart — but can appear larger due to the suspension bridge in the background.a small boat in a body of water: Inokashira Park© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Inokashira Park

Green Tokyo

For a modern metropolis, Tokyo has quite a number of appealing green spaces. Inokashira Park ranks among the best, with a pond, row boats for rent, wooded walking paths and a shrine to one of Japan’s lucky gods.a stone bench sitting next to a window: Japanese onsen© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Japanese onsen

Say “ahhh”

The Japanese archipelago remains volcanically active, and that activity has created mineral hot springs throughout the country. You don’t have to stray far from Tokyo to enjoy a rejuvenating soak in one of these traditional onsen.a group of people sitting at a crowded street: Ameyoko© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Ameyoko

Shop ’til you drop

People looking for some retail therapy won’t have to look far in Tokyo. There’s a shopping district for just about every taste, from the high-end stores of Ginza to the electronics of Shinjuku. For some one-stop shopping, head to the open-air Ameyoko market, where you’ll find clothing, cosmetics and food, all at famously cheap prices.a vase of flowers on a table: Bonsai tree© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Bonsai tree

The art of bonsai

Bonsai, potted miniature trees, have garnered popularity around the world, but they originated in Japan. Keep an eye out for them as you wander around town, learn about the living art at Omiya Bonsai Village just north of Tokyo or do some window shopping at the Morimae Ginza Bonsai Shop in the Ginza district.a group of people in a small boat in a body of water: Shinjuku© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Shinjuku

Springtime sakura

Springtime means one thing in Japan: cherry blossoms. Chidorigafuchi ranks among the best viewing spots in Tokyo, with more than 260 sakura trees of several varieties. Enjoy the view from the pedestrian path alongside the moat, or from a row boat on the water.a group of people in a garden: Nezu-jinja Shrine© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Nezu-jinja Shrine

Azalea Festival

Cherry blossoms aren’t the only thing blooming in Tokyo. Nezu Shrine hosts the Azalea Festival each spring, when the shrine’s 3,000 azalea plants are in full bloom.a group of people standing next to a tree: Ginkgo trees© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Ginkgo trees

Tunnel of trees

Come autumn, Tokyo’s ginkgo trees turn a bright golden color. Many Tokyo streets have the trees growing on either side, creating tunnels of fall foliage. Some of the best places to see them include Meiji Jingu Gaien, Showa Memorial Park and Yoyogi Park.a store in a city: Akihabara© Tokyo Convention & Visitors Bureau Akihabara

Otaku culture

Tokyo’s bustling Akihabara district is ground zero for otaku culture. Shoppers will find numerous shops and boutiques dedicated to anime and manga, as well as electronics. Visit Mandarake, one of the largest manga and anime shops in the world; eat Gundam-themed dishes at Gundam Cafe; or pick up some manga gear to take home.

10Best is a part of the USA TODAY Network, providing an authentically local point of view on destinations around the world, in addition to travel and lifestyle advice.

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/tripideas/go-on-a-virtual-tour-of-tokyo-with-these-gorgeous-photos/ar-BB16pRFn?ocid=msedgntp

Visit Barcelona for Culture and Education

aerial photography of Sagrada Famila during daytime
Alfons Taekema for Unsplash

Barcelona is both cultural and educational. But it is also the second-best city for offering the most culture per kilometer.

The capital of Catalonia is filled with parks and natural features, also earning it a spot in the top 10 for nature lovers. It does the same in terms of providing loads of entertainment and foodie options.

Top Museums in Barcelona

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There’s a common thought from visitors who visit Barcelona: so many museums and so little time! Begin with the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya (shown), the city’s largest museum dedicated to 1,000 years of Catalan art.

Move on to Parc de Montjuic, the national museum and castle that not only houses more European art, but also affords fantastic mountaintop views of the city.

Then explore the science museum, CosmoCaixa, which takes you back as far as prehistoric times.

Top Sites and Landmarks in Barcelona

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But, of course, when you spend time in the artist Gaudi’s world, you simply must visit his architectural works. The world-renowned Basilica of the Sagrada Familia tops the list of places to visit in Barcelona. This cathedral has become the symbol of the city and offers jaw-dropping architecture on both the exterior and interior.

A short stroll away is the Barri Gotic, or Gothic Quarter, with is one of the oldest districts of the city filled with shops and restaurants and surrounded by wonderful architecture.

On your architectural tour, make your way to Casa Batllo (shown). Here, Gaudi’s vision is showcased throughout this unique building’s structure.

Source: https://www.farandwide.com/s/most-educational-cultural-cities-3175d1d6c5c04cba

Classic California Road Trips

a close up of a rock next to a body of water: 7 Classic California Road Trips to Drive in Your Lifetime
© Photo by Lisa Corson

California is, hands down, one of the best places in the world for a road trip. It’s the third largest state in the nation, and its 164,000 square miles are absolutely packed with glorious, varied terrain highlighted by some 66 scenic byways. The 865 miles of coast are strewn with pockets of beach and stretches of sheer cliff. Rocky desert landscapes give way to rolling farmlands, and two-lane highways carve through quiet groves of towering sequoias before climbing into the high, rugged peaks of the 352 mountain ranges. With all that, it’s no wonder you simply cannot get to know the Golden State unless you hit the road. We’ve gathered together seven essential California road trips to get you started. 

Epic California Road Trips

a bridge over a body of water: The Point Reyes Lighthouse is a short but unforgettable detour from Highway 1.© Photo by Chris LaBasco/Shutterstock The Point Reyes Lighthouse is a short but unforgettable detour from Highway 1.Highway 1

Distance: 656 miles

Start: Dana Point (Orange County)

End: Leggett (Mendocino County)

Following the California coastline, iconic State Route 1—or Highway 1—is one of the best road trips in the world. It is sometimes referred to as the Pacific Coast Highway (or “PCH”), though technically, the PCH is only a southern part of the route; other sections of Highway 1 are known as Cabrillo Highway, Coast Highway, or Shoreline Highway. Think of Highway 1 as a collection of the state’s greatest hits. You could drive the route in about five days, but there’s so much to do and see, we’d recommend getting out of the fast lane and giving yourself a week and a half or two weeks to really enjoy it all.

Start off with your toes in the Pacific at Huntington Beach, or Laguna Beach, or any one of the other scenic beaches of sunny southern California, then head north. Catch Spanish colonial architecture and sip local Santa Ynez valley wines in Santa Barbara; as you pass San Simeon, keep an ear out for elephant seals and an eye out for zebras and Hearst Castle. Then follow the forested road through Big Sur, stopping often to marvel at mountains that end abruptly in sea cliffs.

Be sure to pay homage to John Steinbeck at Cannery Row in Monterey, then bundle up to cut through the fog in San Francisco. Don’t worry, it tends to clear just after you cross the Golden Gate Bridge. From there, the road gets narrower and feels more remote as it winds through the hills of Marin County. Grab some oysters in Tomales Bay and picnic along the Point Reyes National Seashore

Finish up your trip walking driftwood beaches and tree-lined trails in the sleepy coastal town of Mendocino, or if you’re feeling really intrepid, keep following the coast north. Highway 1 officially ends in Leggett, where it turns to Highway 101, but that route continues more or less along the Pacific all the way into Oregon.

(Read more about the best stops on a Pacific Coast Highway Road Trip.)a tree with a mountain in the background: Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest is home to some of the oldest living things on Earth.© Photo by Laurens Hoddenbagh/Shutterstock Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest is home to some of the oldest living things on Earth.

Distance: 232 miles

Start: Lone Pine

End: South Lake Tahoe

While Highway 1 follows the coast, its sister trip, Highway 395, traces the Sierra Nevadas, the backbone of California. Rather than beaches and sunsets, a trip through the Eastern Sierra features prehistoric forests, historic mining towns, and all sorts of fantastic geological features. The drive from Lone Pine up to Lake Tahoe is only about four hours—seven if you’re driving to the start point from Los Angeles—but you’ll want to plan for a four- or five-day trip.

Kick off your journey in Lone Pine, a former mining town sandwiched between Sequoia and Death Valley National Parks. Spend the day hiking around the boulders, arches, and jagged peaks of the Alabama Hills, where a number of movies, including The Lone Ranger, Gladiator, and Django Unchained, were filmed, before heading north. Before you leave, pay a visit to Manzanar National Historic Site to remember and honor the 110,000 Japanese Americans who were stripped of their rights and forced into the internment camp during World War II.

In Big Pine, stop for pulled pork and ribs at Copper Top BBQ, then and take a short detour onto Highway 168 to visit Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, home to some of the oldest living trees on the planet. Be on the lookout for hot springs once you pass the climber’s haven of Bishop: Wild Willy’s Hot Springs and Hot Creek Geologic Park are both worth a stop, but as you continue north there are plenty of secret spots locals might share if you ask. A bit farther along Highway 395, you’ll pass Mammoth Mountain, a popular ski resort, and then Mono Lake, with its mud-drip rock formations. Yosemite-bound drivers would head west here, but those continuing north might take a detour to explore the ghost town of Bodie off Highway 270. Leave Highway 395 near Topaz Lake and take Highway 89 to South Lake Tahoe, where you can finish your trip relaxing on the shores of a place Mark Twain once referred to as the “fairest picture the whole world affords.”

Northern California Road Trips

a row of park benches sitting in front of a tree: Be sure to add extra days to your wine country road trip to properly enjoy tastings at wineries like Clos du Val on the Silverado Trail.© Photo by Rocco Cesalin Be sure to add extra days to your wine country road trip to properly enjoy tastings at wineries like Clos du Val on the Silverado Trail.

Northern California Wine Country Road Trip 

Distance: 161 miles

Start: San Francisco

End: San Francisco

A road trip through the Napa Valley and Sonoma Valley should never be about getting from Point A to Point B. It’s more of a circuitous route that meanders through a countryside full of small towns, vineyards, and state parks. Plenty of people treat Northern California wine country as a day trip from San Francisco, but go for a long weekend so that you can really savor those winetastings and pamper yourself with a stay at the Sonoma Mission Inn & Spa or Meadowood Napa Valley.

Make a beeline from San Francisco to Domaine Carneros to start your trip sipping California bubbly. Then jogging north on Highway 121, you’ll pass through the town of Napa, where it’s worth a stop for lunch at the Oxbow Public Market. Continue northeast on Highway 121 and you’ll pass the hot springs resort Vichy Springs, or turn north instead onto the Silverado Trail, where you can hop between some of the best wineries in the area, including Clos du Val and Mumm.

The Silverado Trail ends in Calistoga. From here, loop back to Sonoma via the winding Calistoga Road and Highway 12, stopping to walk off your wine at a few great state parks, including Robert Louis Stevenson State ParkSugarloaf Ridge State Park, and Jack London State Historic Park. Dine on seasonal tacos at El Molino Central in Sonoma, or pick one of the many restaurants that ring historic Sonoma Square. There are plenty of small wineries and towns to explore in this area before you end your trip with a sunset drive back to San Francisco. a flock of seagulls standing on a rock: Lassen Volcanic National Park is filled with lakes and meadows as well as with hydrothermal sites. © Photo by Galyna Andrushko/Shutterstock Lassen Volcanic National Park is filled with lakes and meadows as well as with hydrothermal sites.

Redding to Lassen Volcanic National Park

Distance: 188 miles

Start: Redding

End: Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park and the area around form one of the more beautiful parts of the state, especially if you’re a mountain junkie who loves craggy peaks and volcanic rock. But it’s one that even locals tend to miss, partly because, at two and a half hours from Sacramento and almost four hours northeast of San Francisco, it’s harder to get to than the coast or the state’s wine countries. But those who make the trek should plan for a three-day weekend with plenty of day hikes and geologic curiosities—this is, after all, volcano country. 

Starting in Redding, a bustling city on the Sacramento River, travel north on 1-5 to Shasta Lake, the largest reservoir in California. Continue north on I-5, passing through the Shasta-Trinity National Forest and maybe stopping to take in the ragged spires at Castle Crags State Park, before reaching Mount Shasta, where you can stop to stroll through town or hike in the mountain’s foothills.

Then, escape from the interstate and head south on Highway 89. This section of the highway is actually part of the 500-mile Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway, which travels from Oregon in the north down to Lassen along the Cascade Mountain Range. Take some time to hike McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park and see the 129-foot-tall waterfall that shares a name with the park. Or kayak and paddleboard on serene Lake Almanor. Finish your trip with a day, if not two, wandering through Lassen Volcanic National Park, which is filled with mud pots, geysers, lava fields, shield and cinder cone volcanoes, mountain lakes, and even a few green meadows where you’ll find wildflowers in the spring. a tractor on display at a forest: In its heyday, Empire Mine produced 5.8 million ounces of gold.© Photo by Jim Felcinao/Shutterstock  In its heyday, Empire Mine produced 5.8 million ounces of gold.

Gold Chain Highway (Highway 49)

Distance: 295 miles

Start: Oakhurst

End: Vinton

Follow in the footsteps of miners and prospectors through California’s Gold Country along Highway 49—a road named after the gold-seeking immigrants, or “49ers” who made their way to the state during the 1849 Gold Rush. Plan for five days to give yourself time to strike it rich panning for gold in the region’s rivers. You’ll want to spend time exploring the rocky meadows and pine-covered foothills of the Sierra Nevadas too. 

Start off with a history lesson at the California State Mining and Mineral Museum in Mariposa, just north of Oakhurst. As you move north along the route, you’ll pass a number of Gold Rush–era buildings and towns—many of which you’ll have learned about at the Mining and Mineral Museum. In Coulterville, Hotel Jeffery, first built in 1851, is known for paranormal activities and claims John Muir and Theodore Roosevelt as past visitors. Jamestown’s Railtown 1897 Historic State Park gives a glimpse of what transportation was like in the late 1800s, and Columbia State Historic Park and the town of Sonora are both well-preserved mining towns. 

Highway 49 passes over the South Fork of the American River near Placerville, which is a popular place for river rafting. A little farther north here, in Coloma, you can actually try your own luck with a gold pan at Sutter’s Mill in Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park. Continue up through Auburn State Recreation Area, where the north and middle forks of the American River meet, stopping in Auburn’s Old Town and later Nevada City for Victorian-era homes and a little more historic charm. From there, Highway 49 heads northeast through Tahoe National Forest, but there’s more mining history to see before you end in Vinton. Be sure to stop at Empire Mine in Grass Valley, one of the oldest, largest, deepest, longest, and richest gold mines in California.

Southern California Road Trips

a statue of a bear: Southern California’s Big Bear is full of outdoor activities.© Photo by Shutterstock Southern California’s Big Bear is full of outdoor activities.

Rim of the World Scenic Byway (State Highway 18)

Distance: 117 miles Start: Cajon Pass End: Big Bear

When most people think of Southern California, they think of beaches. But the lower half of the state has just as much glorious mountain scenery as its other half. For visitors who want to spend most of their vacation frolicking in the sand, but also want some mountain air, the relatively short Rim of the World Scenic Byway offers an easy weekend getaway to the rockier terrain of the Inland Empire.  

State Highway 18 officially begins at the Cajon Pass, which is about an hour outside Los Angeles on Highway 138. The route heads east, passing small mountain towns and following cliff edges and skirting the peaks of the San Bernadino Mountains, which are sometimes called the “Alps of Southern California.” Take a slight detour onto route 173 to visit Lake Arrowhead, a popular escape for Angelinos, who head up to camp, hike, and ride the Lake Arrowhead Queen steamboat, and more. You can even hike a section of the Pacific Crest Trail here. Back on Highway 18, at the town of Running Springs, you can take a quick, five-mile side trip up to Keller Peak Fire Lookout, where on a clear day, you might be able to spot the Pacific Ocean. Finally, Highway 18 follows the edge of Big Bear Lake to the town of Big Bear. Book into a cabin and enjoy the area’s hiking and water sports in the summer or snow sports in the winter. 

a person riding on top of a mountain road: Some of California’s most stunning scenery isn’t along the coasts, it’s in Joshua Tree National Park and other desert areas.

© Photo by Lisa Corson Some of California’s most stunning scenery isn’t along the coasts, it’s in Joshua Tree National Park and other desert areas.

The Desert Drive

Distance: 290 miles Start: San Diego End: Joshua Tree National Park

Plenty of travelers make the trip from Los Angeles to Joshua Tree National Park to marvel at its spiky namesake trees. But many think of Joshua Tree as a destination and miss out on all the beautiful and sometimes quirky things the deserts of Southern California have to offer along the way. In fact, you should really spend a full five days exploring the rock formations, wildflower meadows, art installations, and architectural hot spots of this region. 

Starting in San Diego, point your car northeast on Highway 163 to Highway 78 heading toward Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, famous for its wildflower super blooms in the springtime. But even when the flowers aren’t blooming, the landscape is striking, with its badlands, slot canyons, and cactus forests. Near the park entrance, keep an eye out for the 130-foot prehistoric animal sculptures created by Ricardo Breceda.

Once you’ve explored the park, you can either head north on Highway 79 and cut through Anza en route to Palm Springs—the drive through wooded Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument is a nice break from the desert sun—or continue on Palm Canyon Drive toward the dying Salton Sea. Admittedly not the most scenic part of this drive, the Salton Sea is fascinating nonetheless: It’s one of the world’s largest inland seas and is rapidly drying up. Skirt the southside of the body of water, then make your way toward Slab City, an abandoned Navy base that’s become an off-grid living community, and the massive, hand-built and brightly painted art piece Salvation Mountain, just outside.

From Slab City, take Highway 111 north to Palm Springs, an oasis of midcentury modern architecture that’s home to plenty of pools that provide respite from the heat. From Palm Springs, follow Highway 10 to Pioneer Town for a drink or a meal or maybe a concert at the famous saloon Pappy and Harriet’s, just outside of Joshua Tree Park. The area has long attracted artists and bohemian types, so while there’s plenty of natural scenery to enjoy, such as Jumbo Rocks or Skull Rock, make time to visit local art galleries, the Noah Purifoy Desert Art Museum, and the Integratron Sound Bath too.

Article by Maggie Fuller for Afar©

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/tripideas/7-classic-california-road-trips-to-drive-in-your-lifetime/ar-BB168bpR?ocid=msedgntp

10 Best Small Beach Towns in Florida

Not all coastal communities are created equal, but these idyllic locales in Florida stand out from the crowd.

Slide 2 of 11: Located at the halfway point in the Florida Keys, Islamorada is a whimsical paradise where small-town businesses cater to the ultimate island state of mind. If you’re a beer lover, Florida Keys Brewing Co. and Islamorada Beer Company both serve up an impressive selection of local craft brews. Fine Florida-kitschy institutions like Lazy Days Restaurant and Lorelei Restaurant & Cabana Bar offer a quadruple threat of killer water views, fruity cocktails, live music, and fish tacos.

 © Walter Bibikow/Getty Images

Islamorada

Located at the halfway point in the Florida Keys, Islamorada is a whimsical paradise where small-town businesses cater to the ultimate island state of mind. If you’re a beer lover, Florida Keys Brewing Co. and Islamorada Beer Company both serve up an impressive selection of local craft brews. Fine Florida-kitschy institutions like Lazy Days Restaurant and Lorelei Restaurant & Cabana Bar offer a quadruple threat of killer water views, fruity cocktails, live music, and fish tacos.

Slide 3 of 11: The birthplace of the modern shrimping industry, Fernandina Beach is a waterfront village nestled on the north end of Amelia Island. Celebrating pirate culture is a way of life, so it’s not uncommon to see people dressed as swashbucklers just for the heck of it. Visit during the Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival, when the historic district bustles with parades, live music, lots of shrimp, and—you guessed it—pirates.

© Kara Franker

Fernandina Beach

The birthplace of the modern shrimping industry, Fernandina Beach is a waterfront village nestled on the north end of Amelia Island. Celebrating pirate culture is a way of life, so it’s not uncommon to see people dressed as swashbucklers just for the heck of it. Visit during the Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival, when the historic district bustles with parades, live music, lots of shrimp, and—you guessed it—pirates.

Slide 4 of 11: Anna Maria Island is what beach town dreams are made of. You won’t find any hotel chains or condominium towers here, just a collection of tropical-style homes and friendly neighbors who wave from golf carts. Stretching from the bay to the gulf, Pine Avenue is the perfect place to shop funky boutiques, dine at local cafes, and get a feel for that ultimate island lifestyle.

© Kara Franker

Anna Maria Island

Anna Maria Island is what beach town dreams are made of. You won’t find any hotel chains or condominium towers here, just a collection of tropical-style homes and friendly neighbors who wave from golf carts. Stretching from the bay to the gulf, Pine Avenue is the perfect place to shop funky boutiques, dine at local cafes, and get a feel for that ultimate island lifestyle.

Slide 5 of 11: Flanked by two picturesque beach parks and home to the historic Cape Florida Lighthouse, Key Biscayne is an island village with a sophisticated feel. It’s close enough to Miami that you can easily get to and from the 24/7 action of the city, but just far enough out into the ocean that you immediately get that sense of “ahhhhh” when you drive over the Rickenbacker Causeway.

© Crawford A. Wilson III/Getty Images

Key Biscayne

Flanked by two picturesque beach parks and home to the historic Cape Florida Lighthouse, Key Biscayne is an island village with a sophisticated feel. It’s close enough to Miami that you can easily get to and from the 24/7 action of the city, but just far enough out into the ocean that you immediately get that sense of “ahhhhh” when you drive over the Rickenbacker Causeway.

Slide 6 of 11: Perhaps one of the quirkiest beach towns in Florida, Captiva Island is full of character. Golf carts are the preferred method of transportation, and there are zero traffic lights on the island. Beaches here are second to none and offer some of the best shelling you can find. The island sparkles every year during the Captiva Luminary when residents light candles from one end of the island to the other, marking the launch of the holiday season.

© japrz/Getty Images

Captiva Island

Perhaps one of the quirkiest beach towns in Florida, Captiva Island is full of character. Golf carts are the preferred method of transportation, and there are zero traffic lights on the island. Beaches here are second to none and offer some of the best shelling you can find. The island sparkles every year during the Captiva Luminary when residents light candles from one end of the island to the other, marking the launch of the holiday season.

Slide 7 of 11: A colorful coastal town full of pastel houses and funky local eateries, Seaside is a breathtaking nod to life on the beach. The best way to soak up stunning Gulf of Mexico views and explore this friendly community is by foot or bicycle. Neighbors and visitors alike gather every year for the annual 30A Songwriters Festival, with live music performances at Seaside venues and other locales along scenic 30A Highway.

© Tommy Crow Photography/Visit South Walton

Seaside

A colorful coastal town full of pastel houses and funky local eateries, Seaside is a breathtaking nod to life on the beach. The best way to soak up stunning Gulf of Mexico views and explore this friendly community is by foot or bicycle. Neighbors and visitors alike gather every year for the annual 30A Songwriters Festival, with live music performances at Seaside venues and other locales along scenic 30A Highway.

Slide 8 of 11: A hidden gem nestled on the east coast of Florida, Vero Beach is a nature lover’s paradise. Think unspoiled beaches, salt water lagoons and protected wildlife refuges. With miles of biking and hiking trails, there are ample opportunities for eco-friendly adventures. Then enjoy the small-town charm in the “main street” area of Vero Beach, where you’ll find weekly gallery strolls, a vintage market, and plenty of quaint cafes.  

© Doug Schneider Photography/Getty Images

Vero Beach

A hidden gem nestled on the east coast of Florida, Vero Beach is a nature lover’s paradise. Think unspoiled beaches, salt water lagoons and protected wildlife refuges. With miles of biking and hiking trails, there are ample opportunities for eco-friendly adventures. Then enjoy the small-town charm in the “main street” area of Vero Beach, where you’ll find weekly gallery strolls, a vintage market, and plenty of quaint cafes.  

Slide 9 of 11: Cruise down Atlantic Avenue, the main drag in Delray Beach, and you’ll end up at one of the most beautiful beaches on Florida’s east coast. A haven for beachcombers and art lovers, you’ll find more than 20 galleries and iconic public art pieces in downtown and in the Pineapple Grove Arts District, home to Artist Alley. Go for one of the popular Friday gallery nights and browse local art, listen to live music, and dine at one of the eclectic eateries on the “Ave.”

© Jodi Jacobson/Getty Images

Delray Beach

Cruise down Atlantic Avenue, the main drag in Delray Beach, and you’ll end up at one of the most beautiful beaches on Florida’s east coast. A haven for beachcombers and art lovers, you’ll find more than 20 galleries and iconic public art pieces in downtown and in the Pineapple Grove Arts District, home to Artist Alley. Go for one of the popular Friday gallery nights and browse local art, listen to live music, and dine at one of the eclectic eateries on the “Ave.”

Slide 10 of 11: A laid-back beach town with a healthy—and well-loved—population of vintage ice cream parlors, Pass-A-Grille Beach is an island town located at the southernmost end of St. Pete Beach. Sunset is a nightly rite of passage as locals and visitors gather at the seawall outside of Paradise Grille to ring the sunset bell. The rooftop deck of the Hurricane Seafood Restaurant also offers spectacular views of the sun’s descent into the Gulf of Mexico.

© Kara Franker

Pass-A-Grille Beach

A laid-back beach town with a healthy—and well-loved—population of vintage ice cream parlors, Pass-A-Grille Beach is an island town located at the southernmost end of St. Pete Beach. Sunset is a nightly rite of passage as locals and visitors gather at the seawall outside of Paradise Grille to ring the sunset bell. The rooftop deck of the Hurricane Seafood Restaurant also offers spectacular views of the sun’s descent into the Gulf of Mexico.

Slide 11 of 11: Surrounded by the azure waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Gasparilla Island is truly an ode to Old Florida. Shelling enthusiasts find an impressive assortment of treasured sea shells and sand dollars tucked between layers of pure white sand, while fisherman flock to the area for its prized tarpon fishing. Visit one of the two stately lighthouses on the island, where you’ll find postcard-perfect views, especially at sunset.

© MyLoupe/UIG/Getty Images

Gasparilla Island

Surrounded by the azure waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Gasparilla Island is truly an ode to Old Florida. Shelling enthusiasts find an impressive assortment of treasured sea shells and sand dollars tucked between layers of pure white sand, while fisherman flock to the area for its prized tarpon fishing. Visit one of the two stately lighthouses on the island, where you’ll find postcard-perfect views, especially at sunset.

Article by Kara Franker of Southern Living ©

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/tripideas/10-best-small-beach-towns-in-florida/ss-BB167dnW?ocid=msedgntp#image=1

Want to get away ?

I had no idea these existed!! - Album on Imgur

Some comments by readers:

I just googled these, and each one costs more money than I paid for my car.

Why is this better than a tent?

They’re a requirement camping in Australia, so crocodiles don’t eat you

Anyone seeing this going wrong

Pretty sure car roof racks are meant to carry a few suitcases at most, not People…

This is in-tents…

If the tent is rock’n, don’t come a knock’n.

Can fat people use them?

Thanks but I don’t weigh 80 lbs. And I don’t want to cave in the roof of my car.

Great if it’s raining and there is no higher ground or if there’s snakes, spiders or other dangerous crap aka any Australian animal.

Well you just can’t please everyone, can you.

Source: https://imgur.com/gallery/Abck4

THE ONE LAS VEGAS EXPERIENCE EVERYONE IS MISSING OUT ON

Awesome kayaking day trip from Las Vegas. Kayak Black Canyon near the Hoover Dam. / Travel Mindset

THE ONE LAS VEGAS EXPERIENCE EVERYONE IS MISSING OUT ON

By Bobby Christian

Black Canyon kayaking tour is the one Las Vegas experience everyone is missing out on.  Within an hour from the strip, Lake Mojave winds its way between towering canyon walls and alongside some of the most unexpected terrain in the American Southwest, including cave saunas, island turquoise water, and secluded hot springs. 

On a recent Viator Tour, I embarked on a full day kayaking trip that is now my go-to Vegas adventure.

Starting bright and early, the Viator tour picks you up from your Vegas hotel and takes you for a 50- minute drive to the desert. Once there, you are teamed up with your kayak (they have double or single kayaks, depending on who you are traveling with) and the skillful and friendly guide talks about the type of trip you’re about to embark on. Depending on the day, kayakers have been known to see bald eagles, Big Horn sheep, and hawks. And that’s just the wildlife. 

The kayak trip is long- it’s a full day- and you’ll be kayaking for most of it. The full course is 12 miles, with lots of stops along the way. The adventure stops and the changing scenery were my favorite part of the entire tour.

While the trip down stream is lined with dozens of stops, here are my picks for Black Canyon’s top five most amazing sights and experiences.

1.) Emerald Cove – Pulling into the cove, the clear emerald water tosses up a web of teal light that dances across the cavern walls.  This is one of the most talked about spots on the river, and being within two miles of the Marina, is the most accessible stop for visitors not wanting a full day trip. 

2.) Sauna Cave – Simply put, this is one of my top travel surprises ever. Climbing into the cave, the desert atmosphere is immediately replaced by thick, humid air and a wading pool knee-to-waist deep. Along the walls, the rock exterior is gradually overtaken by what look like flowstones giving the pitch-black corridor a magical feel.  Slowly the water subsides and the cave dead ends into a small cavern, where the thick sauna air can reach 120 degree Fahrenheit, perfect for a steam. 

3.) Arizona Hot Springs – These hot pools, sunk in between narrow canyon walls are the most secluded springs I’ve ever visited.  Just a short hike from the shore, and at the top of a waterfall, this series of pools is literally wedged between towering canyon walls making the entire experience feel like you’ve stumbled upon something secret. 

4.) Gold Strike Canyon – Weeping Rocks, waterfalls, and temperature controlled hot springs, this is one of the most geologically exciting places I’ve visited and I don’t understand how I hadn’t heard about it before.  Nearly right off the shore, the canyon is covered in a huge variety of eye-catching sights, like weeping rocks and waterfalls.  One of the highlights was a hot pool built at the base of two streams, one hot and one cold, so the bathers could naturally regulate the temperature.

5.) The River/Lake – Emerald green, sapphire blue, the water is the color of Italian sorbet, and, continually, its vibrancy blew me away.  Not only is the water in Black Canyon nearly identical to ocean in Cancun, it’s unbelievably clear.  The Hoover Dam filters out sediment from upstream, so when paddling through the canyon, the lakebed is visible down to nearly 30 feet, all along the way I could watch submerged rock towers pass beneath the kayak.

Must note: The only way to reach the starting point of the tour, with a kayak put-in right under the Hoover Dam, is to take this Viator tour. They only allow 40 park passes a day and while you can express Black Canyon through the park without a pass, you can not get that close to the Dam without one. 

https://inspiration.travelmindset.com/