If You’re Offered This on a Plane, Just Say No, Flight Attendants Warn

Slide 1 of 5: With holiday travel back in full swing, you've probably noticed that your flights home are just as packed as they've ever been, if not more so. But whether your trip is a mere two hours or a whopping 14, you should try to make your flight as comfortable as possible. Flight attendants will do their best to aid you in that pursuit: From a can of soda to a pair of headphones, they offer everything that they can to make sure that passengers have a smooth ride. At the same time, there are some in-flight amenities that you shouldn't take advantage of. According to flight attendants, if you're offered certain items on a plane, you're better off turning them down. Read on to find out what you should just say no to.RELATED: Never Ask for This One Favor on a Plane, Flight Attendants Warn.Read the original article on Best Life.

With holiday travel back in full swing, you’ve probably noticed that your flights home are just as packed as they’ve ever been, if not more so. But whether your trip is a mere two hours or a whopping 14, you should try to make your flight as comfortable as possible. Flight attendants will do their best to aid you in that pursuit: From a can of soda to a pair of headphones, they offer everything that they can to make sure that passengers have a smooth ride. At the same time, there are some in-flight amenities that you shouldn’t take advantage of. According to flight attendants, if you’re offered certain items on a plane, you’re better off turning them down. Read on to find out what you should just say no to.

Slide 2 of 5: Once you board a plane, you may be in for quite a long flight, depending on your destination. To make yourself comfortable for the next however many hours, you might want to make use of some of the amenities being offered to you, including the complimentary pillows and blankets that are often left on your seat. However, you should think twice before getting cozy with these items. In a 2019 interview with Inside Edition, flight attendant Jamila Hardwick revealed that you should never use the blankets and pillows that are on a plane."Bring your own," she said. "These [blankets] get washed, but we're not sure how great they get washed, right. Same for the pillows."RELATED: Never Do This on a Plane, Infectious Disease Doctor Warns.

Never use the blankets or pillows you’re given on a flight.

Once you board a plane, you may be in for quite a long flight, depending on your destination. To make yourself comfortable for the next however many hours, you might want to make use of some of the amenities being offered to you, including the complimentary pillows and blankets that are often left on your seat. However, you should think twice before getting cozy with these items. In a 2019 interview with Inside Edition, flight attendant Jamila Hardwick revealed that you should never use the blankets and pillows that are on a plane.

“Bring your own,” she said. “These [blankets] get washed, but we’re not sure how great they get washed, right. Same for the pillows.”

The blankets and pillows aren’t washed until the end of the day.

The pillows and blankets provided for you aren’t cleaned nearly as often as you’d think. Flight attendant Linda Ferguson told Business Insider in 2018 that these items are reused from flight to flight, without being properly washed until the day is over. So, if you’re on the very first flight of the day, you’re more likely to be supplied with freshly cleaned pillows and blankets. However, if you’re not, these items can essentially become an easy way for germs from another passenger to be passed onto you.

“I see people wrap their feet in the blankets, I see people sneeze in the blankets,” Ferguson said.

Pillows, like the neck ones, are sometimes changed in between flights, but only to a certain extent. Airlines “will take the lining off the pillow and give you a new one,” Hardwick added. “But you still have the pillow in there that’s dirty.”

There are many areas on a plane where you’re susceptible to germs.

Pillows and blankets aren’t the only unsanitary items on your flight. In July, flight attendant Tommy Cimato detailed the dirtiest spots on airplanes in a TikTok video. He explains that passengers should not fall asleep or lean their heads on the window because “you’re not the only one who has done that.” And you never know how many people have wiped their hands on your makeshift pillow.

Cimato also recommends that when going to the bathroom, you never touch the flush button or lever with your hands. Since you don’t know what germs could be there, use a napkin or tissue to flush instead.

Article by Amber Raiken for BestLife©

Source: If You’re Offered This on a Plane, Just Say No, Flight Attendants Warn (msn.com)

Never Eat Microwaved Food Without Doing This First

When you want a meal and you want it fast, you probably head straight for your microwave oven. But experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warn that all too often, you may be skipping a crucial step in your meal-making process—and one that ensures your safety. Their experts say that you should never eat a microwaved meal without doing this one thing first and you could be putting your health at risk if you skip this step. Read on to find out if you’ve been making this risky move and how to keep yourself safe.

© Provided by Best Life

Don’t eat microwaved food without checking its temperature first.

Thermometer in Kobe Sirloin indicates 162 degrees, which is considered medium to medium well. On Rustic Cutting Board with grilling tongs.

According to the CDC you should never eat microwaved food without first checking its temperature with a food thermometer—especially if you’re heating meat. “When you think your food is done, place the food thermometer in the thickest part of the food, making sure not to touch bone, fat, or gristle,” the health authority advises. Checking more than one part of your food will help alert you to a microwave that cooks unevenly.

CDC experts say that your thermometer should in most cases reach a minimum of 165 degrees Fahrenheit, “a temperature hot enough to kill germs.”

Reheating food below this temperature could be a serious health hazard.

Failing to microwave your food to a safe temperature can put you at increased risk of food poisoning. Experts say this holds true regardless of whether you’re cooking pre-packaged microwavable meals or yesterday’s leftovers—both of which have been linked to Salmonella and Listeria outbreaks.

“Thorough cooking in the microwave is especially important because, contrary to popular belief, microwaves don’t cook food from the inside out,” warns Consumer Reports. “The microwaves only penetrate food to a depth of about one to one and a half inches. At the center, thicker foods cook by conduction, as the heat moves from the outside in,” their experts explain.

Of all foods, poultry is perhaps the most likely to make you sick when improperly microwaved. “In our tests for bacteria in fresh chicken published in 2007, we found that 83 percent of the birds harbored campylobacter or Salmonella, a stunning increase from 2003, when 49 percent of the birds tested harbored one or both pathogens,” says Consumer Reports.

However, the safe minimum temperature may vary depending on what you’re cooking.

The CDC notes that some meats require higher minimum temperatures than others. Their experts say that all poultry should be cooked to 165 degrees Fahrenheit, while ground beef, lamb, and pork must reach a minimum of 160 degrees Fahrenheit. Fish can be lower still, at 145 degrees Fahrenheit. Heat other cuts of beef, pork, and lamb, such as veal chops, roasts, and steaks to at least 145 degrees Fahrenheit, then let them stand for three minutes before serving. Doing so enables the food to continue cooking after the microwave turns off and gives food a more consistent temperature throughout, the CDC explains.

Adjust your cooking time depending on your microwave’s wattage.

The CDC recommends looking up your microwave’s wattage, either in the owner’s manual, the manufacturer’s website, or inside the oven’s door. If your microwave has a lower wattage—typically meaning between 600 and 900 watts—it means your food may require a longer cooking time.

When in doubt, a food thermometer will take the guesswork out of whether or not your meal is safe and ready to eat.

Article by Lauren Gray  for Best Life©

Source: Never Eat Microwaved Food Without Doing This First, CDC Says (msn.com)

It’s Not the Turkey That’s Making You Tired

(Blame It on the Trimmings)

You know the drill: Greet relatives, eat turkey, pass out on the couch. But is turkey really to blame for the post-sup stupor? We got to the bottom of this persistent Thanksgiving myth.

does-turkey-really-make-you-tired

ISTOCK/BHOFACK2

Just as traditional as the Thanksgiving turkey is the overstuffed and satisfied sleepiness that follows. And although society has historically pointed a finger at turkey, it turns out that it’s not the main cause of this overwhelming fatigue.

Yes, turkey does contain tryptophan, an amino acid that is a component of the feel-good chemical serotonin as well as a precursor to the sleep-inducing hormone, melatonin. But tryptophan can be found in all kinds of foods, ranging from dairy products and nuts to meats and tofu. And not only that, but turkey doesn’t have higher levels of tryptophan than any other common meat, reported the New York Times. In fact, gram for gram, even cheddar cheese contains greater amounts of tryptophan than turkey, says livescience.com. So if the tryptophan in turkey really did cause our post-Thanksgiving drowsiness, we’d experience the same strong, lethargic sensation every time we ate chicken, beef, cheese, or nuts. And, as we know, this obviously isn’t the case.

But if the tryptophan in turkey isn’t to blame for our sleepiness on Thanksgiving, what is?

It’s actually a combination of factors, starting with the high fat content of most Thanksgiving dinners. The average festive meal contains 229 grams of fat and 3,000 calories, reported MSNBC; that’s more than most men and women eat in an entire day! Digesting fat requires a lot of energy, so the body sends more blood to your digestive system to manage the load. Reduced blood flow throughout your body means reduced energy.

Alcohol is another reason your eyelids may grow heavy. On Thanksgiving, many adults drink beer, wine, or cocktails throughout the day and with their meals without realizing that alcohol is a central nervous system depressant with fast-acting sedative effects.

Finally, on Thanksgiving, even low-carb dieters allow themselves to indulge in carbohydrate-rich foods such as mashed potatoes, pies, stuffing, cornbread, yams covered in marshmallows, and more—all in one sitting. But eating such a ridiculous amount of carbohydrates at once triggers the release of insulin, and digesting it all is a lot of work for your body, which can leave you feeling pretty comatose.

If you swear that you feel particularly sleepy after your Thanksgiving meal, it’s true—you’re not imagining it. But don’t blame the poor turkey. If don’t want to snore on the floor after you’ve cleared your plate, cut back on the fat, carbs, and booze! 

Article by Aubrey Almanza for The Healthy.com©

Source: Does Turkey Really Make You Tired? | The Healthy

CDC Chief Warned That It’s Flu Season; Get Your Flu Shot

“This time of year, we typically see other respiratory viruses circulating like influenza. Last week’s influenza surveillance report noted an increase in flu activity that could mark the beginning of the influenza season,” said Walensky. “We have been anticipating the return of flu viruses this season. If you’re wondering if you should get a flu vaccine, you should. It’ll protect you and your family against the flu. What’s the best gift to give this year? Consider the gift of health. It’s priceless as we head into the holiday and winter season now is the time to think about protection for ourselves and our families. So many of us miss being with our friends and family last year, for those who are at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19 and who are eligible for a COVID-19 booster dose, go out now and get your extra booster dose to protect you. And for those who are not yet vaccinated and including our children, teens, and adolescents who are now all eligible for vaccination, get vaccinated, this getting vaccinated this week, we’ll set you up to being fully protected in time for the holidays and by the end of the year.”

By Alek Korab for Eat This, Not That©

Source: Dr. Fauci Just Said When the Pandemic Will End (msn.com)

5 Healthy Reasons to Sip Cinnamon Tea

© Getty ImagesWin win: It tastes good and it’s good for you.

Consider cinnamon tea your health boost in a cup. This hot, nourishing beverage feeds your body well, thanks to the humble yet powerful combination of infusing healthy cinnamon into boiling water. 

Serving up a delicious cup is easy. To make cinnamon tea at home, Tara Coleman, CN, clinical nutritionist, recommends simply simmering 1 cinnamon stick in 1 cup of water for 15 minutes. Strain out the cinnamon and enjoy. “Add a slice of lemon and a little honey if you want a sweeter drink,” she says. No time to simmer? You can also find cinnamon tea bags at your grocery or online.

The best part about cinnamon tea isn’t even how good it tastes. Here are some of the healthiest benefits of drinking this type of tea, from hydration to anti-inflammation.

Cinnamon tea provides serious antioxidants.

“Cinnamon tea may offer numerous health benefits, at least in part due to its rich polyphenol antioxidant content,” explains LeeAnn Smith Weintraub, MPH, RD, a nutrition counselor and consultant. Polyphenols are micronutrients found in plants that are packed with antioxidant properties, which help protect your cells against damage caused by free radicals, fight inflammation, and prevent disease.  

It helps lower inflammation.

Cinnamon is a powerful anti-inflammatory agent, and sipping it as tea offers those benefits, too. As one study notes, out of 115 foods tested, Sri Lankan cinnamon was found to be one of the “most potent anti-inflammatory foods.” Research published in the Journal of AOAC found that cinnamon’s high volume of phenolic compounds help reduce inflammation in the body.

Cinnamon tea helps manage blood sugar.

Whip up a cup of cinnamon tea to keep your blood sugar even. “[Cinnamon] has a compound that acts similar to insulin and helps move sugar from your blood into the cells,” explains Coleman. “It’s been shown to help with insulin resistance for up to 12 hours after you drink it.” 

Its water content delivers nutrients more quickly.

It might sound obvious, but the water in cinnamon tea plays a significant, beneficial role as well, and many additional health perks come from the fact that tea is water-based. For one, water helps nourish your gastrointestional (GI) tract—so everything flows through your system more easily. 

“Many health-promoting compounds in cinnamon are water soluble, and it’s safe to say, tea is an optimal way to ingest cinnamon,” Weintraub says. Water soluble is just a fancy way of describing something that dissolves in water, making cinnamon tea an ideal way to deliver cinnamon’s nutrients to your body. 

Cinnamon tea is hydrating.

The US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recommend that men drink 15.5 cups of water a day and women drink 11.5 cups of water a day—and don’t forget that one cup of tea counts as one cup of hydration for the day. 

Article by Nicole Clancy for Real Simple©

Source: 5 Healthy Reasons to Sip Cinnamon Tea (msn.com)

5 Places You’ll Most Likely Catch COVID

The coronavirus doesn’t take a day off: The virus continues to spread and CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta revealed five places where coronavirus transmission is more likely to occur than others. “It’s really these five primary locations where viral transmissions are happening in our society,” Dr. Gupta said. Read on to hear his warning.

1. Houses of Worship

The Supreme Court blocked state COVID-19 restrictions against houses of worship but use caution if you plan to attend: They are hotspots for the virus. 

Slide 3 of 7: "Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19," says the CDC, calling "a house or cabin with people from your household (e.g., vacation rentals)" more risky and "Hotels or multi-unit guest lodgings (e.g., bed and breakfasts)" "even more risky."RELATED: Most Common Health Problems After Age 70, Say Doctors

2. Hotels

“Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19,” says the CDC, calling “a house or cabin with people from your household (e.g., vacation rentals)” more risky and “Hotels or multi-unit guest lodgings (e.g., bed and breakfasts)” “even more risky.”

Slide 4 of 7: Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has said: "We need to really take seriously the issue of wearing masks all the time and not congregating in bars," calling them "certainly an important mechanism of this spread."RELATED: Sure Ways to Never Forget Anything, Say Experts

3. Bars

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has said: “We need to really take seriously the issue of wearing masks all the time and not congregating in bars,” calling them “certainly an important mechanism of this spread.”

Slide 5 of 7: "In cities worldwide, coronavirus outbreaks have been linked to restaurants, cafes and gyms. Now, a new model using mobile-phone data to map people's movements suggests that these venues could account for most COVID-19 infections in US cities," reports Nature. "The team then used the model to simulate different scenarios, such as reopening some venues while keeping others closed. They found that opening restaurants at full capacity led to the largest increase in infections, followed by gyms, cafes and hotels and motels."RELATED: The #1 Cause of Shingles, According to Science

4. Cafés

“In cities worldwide, coronavirus outbreaks have been linked to restaurants, cafes and gyms. Now, a new model using mobile-phone data to map people’s movements suggests that these venues could account for most COVID-19 infections in US cities,” reports Nature. “The team then used the model to simulate different scenarios, such as reopening some venues while keeping others closed. They found that opening restaurants at full capacity led to the largest increase in infections, followed by gyms, cafes and hotels and motels.”

Slide 6 of 7: One way you can catch COVID is to be indoors with strangers (or anyone you're not sheltering with) who have their masks off. Naturally, you must take your mask off to eat. That's why restaurants are so problematic. "When you have restaurants indoors in a situation where you have a high degree of infection in the community, you're not wearing masks, that's a problem," Dr. Fauci has said. He prefers takeout or delivery.RELATED: Everyday Habits That Shorten Your Life, According to Science

5. Restaurants

One way you can catch COVID is to be indoors with strangers (or anyone you’re not sheltering with) who have their masks off. Naturally, you must take your mask off to eat. That’s why restaurants are so problematic. “When you have restaurants indoors in a situation where you have a high degree of infection in the community, you’re not wearing masks, that’s a problem,” Dr. Fauci has said. He prefers takeout or delivery.

Slide 7 of 7: Follow the public health fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—get vaccinated ASAP; if you live in an area with low vaccination rates, wear an N95 face mask, don't travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, don't go indoors with people you're not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, and to protect your life and the lives of others, don't visit any of these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch COVID.

6. How to Survive This Pandemic

Follow the public health fundamentals and help end this pandemic, no matter where you live—get vaccinated ASAP; if you live in an area with low vaccination rates, wear an N95 face mask, don’t travel, social distance, avoid large crowds, don’t go indoors with people you’re not sheltering with (especially in bars), practice good hand hygiene, and protect your life and the lives of others.

Photo credit: Eatthisnotthat©

Article by Alek Korab 

Source: 5 Places You’ll Most Likely Catch COVID, According to Dr. Gupta (msn.com)

Check your freezer: Some Food favorites has been recalled

Look Before You Eat

They say nothing is certain in life but death and taxes, but we’d add another irksome reality to that list: recalls, recalls, recalls. Government agencies are constantly blasting notices of potentially contaminated food, from meat to produce to packaged products. We’ve been keeping tabs on some of the most notable recalls over the past year, including Trader Joe’s chicken patties that have been pulled from shelves over contamination fears.

Slide 2 of 26: Risk: Bone-fragment contaminationInnovative Solutions announced Nov. 10 that it's recalling nearly 98,000 pounds of raw ground chicken patty products that may be contaminated with pieces of bone. At issue are packages of Trader Joe's Chile Lime Chicken Burgers, as well as Spinach Feta Chicken Sliders that were sold at other stores. The products, which were shipped nationwide, were produced from mid-August through the end of September and are marked with “EST. P-8276,” printed near the USDA mark of inspection. Related: 23 Things You Should Skip at Trader Joe's

 © U.S. Department of Agriculture

Trader Joe’s Chile Lime Chicken Burgers

Risk: Bone-fragment contamination

Innovative Solutions announced Nov. 10 that it’s recalling nearly 98,000 pounds of raw ground chicken patty products that may be contaminated with pieces of bone. At issue are packages of Trader Joe’s Chile Lime Chicken Burgers, as well as Spinach Feta Chicken Sliders that were sold at other stores. The products, which were shipped nationwide, were produced from mid-August through the end of September and are marked with “EST. P-8276,” printed near the USDA mark of inspection. 

Raw Onions

Risk: Salmonella

A salmonella outbreak that has sickened more than 650 people across the U.S. has been linked to raw onions from Mexico, according to the CDC. Idaho-based ProSource Produce has recalled red, yellow, and white onions that it imported and distributed throughout July and August in 35 states and Canada. While none of the onions have been distributed since the end of August, officials note that they can last for up to three months in storage, and have urged the public to throw out raw onions if it’s unclear where they came from. 

Bagged Kale

Risk: Listeria

Kale is the pinnacle of healthy superfood, but check what you’ve stashed in the fridge. Bagged kale sold under the Baker Farms, Kroger, and SEG Grocers labels has been recalled because of potential listeria contamination. The 1-pound bags were distributed in 11 states and have a best-by date of Sept. 18. 

Fratelli Beretta Uncured Antipasto Products

Risk: Salmonella

Fratelli Beretta, which makes Italian-style meats carried at Costco, has recalled 862,000 pounds of uncured antipasto products including prosciutto, soppressata, salami, and coppa because of possible salmonella contamination linked to as many as 36 illnesses. The meats were sold in vacuum-sealed trays at Costco from February through August and have best-by dates as late as Feb. 11, 2022. 

Here’s the complete list to date:

Check your freezer: This Trader Joe’s favorite has been recalled (msn.com)

Thanks to Saundra Latham for Cheapism™

Popular Foods Causing Your High Blood Pressure

Finding out you have high blood pressure can be terrifying. After all, the condition is linked to an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, the first and fifth most common causes of death in the U.S., respectively. While genetic factors may increase your risk of developing high blood pressure, in many cases, the condition is also highly linked to a modifiable factor: your diet.

If you want to get your blood pressure into healthier territory, read on to discover which popular foods could be contributing to your hypertension risk, according to science. 

Processed meats

While there are plenty of protein sources that are beneficial for your overall health, processed meats like hot dogs, bacon, sausage, and some deli meats, don’t number among them.

A 2015 study published in PLoS One found that, among patients receiving hemodialysis, processed meat intake was significantly associated with higher blood pressure due in part to the high sodium content of these products.

Candy

If you want to satisfy your sweet tooth, you may want to stick to fruit and naturally sweetened foods to do so.

A 2019 study published in Nutrients reviewed data from 128 participants between 65 and 80 years old. What the study’s researchers discovered was that, while whole fruit intake was associated with reductions in diastolic blood pressure in both men and women, added sugar was significantly linked to increases in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, meaning your candy habit could be increasing your hypertension risk.

Processed cheese

You don’t necessarily have to take all dairy products off your menu if you want to improve your blood pressure, but you might want to kick processed cheese to the curb.

A 2020 study published in Nutrition Journal reviewed data from a group of 40,526 French women, following them post-study for an average of 12.2 years. What the study’s researchers discovered was that, while overall dairy intake wasn’t associated with an increased risk of high blood pressure, consumption of processed cheese was positively associated with an elevated risk of hypertension.

Butter

Processed cheese isn’t the only dairy product you might want to steer clear of if you’re worried about your blood pressure, however.

A 2013 study published in Hypertension found no link between arterial stiffness and dairy consumption with one exception: butter. Instead, the study’s researchers found that diastolic blood pressure increased with butter intake, as did insulin levels and cholesterol.

Article by Sarah Crow for Eatthis,notthat©

Source: Popular Foods Causing Your High Blood Pressure, Says Science (msn.com)

Never Eat a Piece of Fish If You See This on the Packaging

© Provided by Best Life

Whether you follow a pescatarian diet or just enjoy a piece of grilled salmon or sushi roll from time to time, fish is a great way to add filling protein and heart-healthy omega-3s to your meals. And while most fish has benefits for your wellbeing, not all seafood is created equal when it comes to your health.

In fact, there’s one sure sign you shouldn’t eat a particular piece of fish—and what’s on the packaging could tip you off to the problem. Read on to discover how to spot the issue to keep yourself safe.

If you see ice crystals on a fish’s packaging, don’t buy it.

When you’re buying fish, there’s one clear indicator that you should toss a particular package back rather than eating it: ice crystals.

While you might imagine that seeing ice on a package of frozen fish is a good sign, indicating that it’s been kept cold, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) says otherwise. The authority explains that ice crystals may be an indicator that the fish has spent a prolonged period in storage, meaning it’s not exactly fresh, or that it has thawed and been subsequently refrozen, which could indicate changes in its temperature that could potentially support the growth of dangerous bacteria.

Additional packaging changes may tip you off to a problem.

Ice crystals on a fish’s packaging aren’t the only telltale signs that something might be amiss.

The FDA recommends steering clear any frozen seafood with torn or open packaging, as well as any packaging with crushed edges. Additionally, you can tell whether or not a frozen fish is a good choice by feeling its flesh—if it’s pliable and doesn’t feel solid, you’re better off avoiding it.

Fresh fish should be displayed on ice.

Though you may want to avoid any packaged frozen fish that has ice crystals on it, that doesn’t mean ice and fish are always incompatible.

If you’re purchasing fresh fish, the FDA recommends that you only buy products that have been kept on a bed of ice—and, ideally, stored in a case or other enclosed or covered environment—or ones that have been kept refrigerated.

You can’t judge the quality of previously frozen fish on appearance alone.

While there are plenty of foods you can eyeball to determine their freshness, fish doesn’t number among them.

The FDA notes that any fish product that that’s labeled “previously frozen” may have undergone changes that may make its appearance noticeably different from that of a fresh fish. Specifically, a previously frozen fish may have changes in its gill color, texture, bloodlines, and the appearance of its eyes.

Article by Sarah Crow for BestLife©

Source: Never Eat a Piece of Fish If You See This on the Packaging, FDA Says (msn.com)

Do You Need To Clean Your Humidifier?

Woman's Hand Adjusting Humidifier
CREDIT: GETTY/MITRY MARCHENKO / EYEEM

Let’s start with an easy question: Do you need to clean your humidifier? Yes. If you don’t clean your humidifier thoroughly and regularly, you could be introducing additional mold and mildew spores into the air. Furthermore, if you don’t clean it often enough, your machine could also see decreased functionality and effectiveness due to mineral buildup, which could cause a blockage in your machine and result in a broken nebulizer or heating element. So, yes, it’s best to clean your humidifier and do it often if it’s getting regular or heavy use.

How Often To Clean a Humidifier

The water in your humidifier should be replaced daily. It’s recommended to thoroughly clean your humidifier somewhere between every 3 to 7 days. If you skew on the latter side of that spectrum and start to see pink mold starting to appear by the time cleaning day arrives, go ahead and increase the cleaning frequency.

The Best Way To Clean a Humidifier

To start on your humidifier-cleaning journey, it’s best to start at the source with your humidifier manufacturer’s cleaning instructions. Whether you should use vinegar or even bleach will depend on your unique machine, though vinegar tends to be the more commonly used cleaning agent for this particular job. While instructions vary from machine to machine and manufacturer to manufacturer, we’ll give you a rough idea of how to clean a basic system.

  1. Unplug the machine and pour out any remaining water from the tank and the base.
  2. Fill the base with a 1:1 ratio of water to vinegar. Let it sit for a full hour or more depending how badly your humidifier is in need of a clean.  
  3. While the vinegar works away at the mold, slime, and buildup on the base, fill the reservoir with a couple cups of vinegar. Replace the knob to seal it, then shake and shake some more. This will help loosen any grime. To empty, press on the little spring lever on the knob. The vinegar should slowly seep out, flushing the nozzle while it empties. Once empty, fill with water, shake, and empty.
  4. Once your base has soaked for an hour or more, pour out the solution and wipe out the interior of the base with a cloth that has been soaked in vinegar. Any buildup or remaining residue should wipe off relatively easily at this point. Use the vinegar cloth to wipe down other exterior elements as well, allowing everything to air dry before storing.

Timely advise from Patricia Shannon for Southern Living©

Source: How To Clean Your Humidifier | Southern Living