What to Know About Coronavirus

The Deadly Virus That Just Entered the U.S. from China

 

a group of different colors: A coronavirus outbreak has caused hundreds of illnesses and 25 deaths in China, and two cases have been confirmed in the U.S. Doctors explain what you should know.

DR GOPAL MURTI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY – Getty Image

A coronavirus outbreak has caused hundreds of illnesses and 25 deaths in China. Currently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed two official cases of the infection within the United States.

A person returning to Washington state from Wuhan, China,—where an outbreak of coronavirus is taking place—was diagnosed with coronavirus earlier this week. Today, the CDC said a second infection has been diagnosed in a Chicago woman who returned after traveling to the area. Texas A&M University has also confirmed that “a student may have a possible case of novel coronavirus.”

U.S. health officials are currently monitoring 63 other potential cases across 22 states. Despite a growing number of cases in Asia, the World Health Organization says “it is still too early to declare a public health emergency of international concern.”

This type of coronavirus, known as 2019-nCoV, was originally thought to spread from animals to people, “but person-to-person spread of 2019-nCoV is occurring,” the CDC says. So, how worried should you be? Here, everything you need to know about coronavirus, its symptoms, and what experts think about its potential impact within the U.S.

How worried should you be about coronavirus?

Hundreds of people in China have been infected with coronavirus and hospitalized, and it’s a little scary that it’s now in the U.S. But infectious disease experts say you shouldn’t panic. “The CDC is really on top of this,” Dr. Schaffner says.

Infectious disease doctors and public health officials are also “very aware” of coronavirus around the country, he adds, and many have implemented steps where patients with respiratory symptoms are now asked whether they’ve recently been to China or have had contact with someone recently who has been to the country. If the answer is “yes,” they’ll be quarantined.

People coming through five different airports in the U.S. are also now being screened for coronavirus, which can help detect cases early. “We have two cases right now and they’re pretty well contained, but we can expect more,” Dr. Adalja says. Despite the headlines, he also stresses that “contacts of the two case patients are being monitored and would only be contagious when symptomatic.”

To steer clear of any possible infection (especially during flu season), he says to practice good hand hygiene and try to steer clear of people who appear to be sick. The CDC also recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to Wuhan, China.

By Korin Miller of Prevention Magazine

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/health-news/what-to-know-about-coronavirus-the-deadly-virus-that-just-entered-the-us-from-china/ar-BBZdwwu?ocid=spartanntp

 

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Your waist size may be more important than weight for heart attack risk

By Katie Hunt, CNN

 

a pair of feet wearing blue and black shoes

© Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock

 

It’s been known for a while that having a pot belly, even if you are slim elsewhere, increases the odds of having a first heart attack, The link was particularly strong in men, researchers said.

A study found that belly fat was associated with heart attacks and stroke independent of other risk factors like smoking, diabetes, hypertension, body mass index and prevention treatments. The researchers stressed that waist circumference was a more important marker than overall obesity and advised doctors to measure their patient’s waists to identify those at risk. Most patients — 78% of men and 90% of women — had abdominal obesity, defined as a waist circumference of 94 cm (37.6 inches) or above for men, and 80 cm (32 inches) or above for women.

However, they said that the link was stronger and more linear in men, who made up nearly three-fourths of the patients included in the study, than women.

In women, Dr. Hanieh Mohammadi said the relationship was “U-shaped” rather than linear, meaning that the mid-range waist measurement, rather than the narrowest, was least risky. What’s more, the mid-range waist measurement was in the range traditionally recognized as at risk for abdominal obesity: more than 80 cm wide.

The reason for this could be down to the type of fat that tends to hang out on men’s and women’s bellies. Mohammadi said some studies have suggested that men may have more visceral fat that goes deep inside your body and wraps around your vital organs.
This fat can be turned into cholesterol that can start collecting along and hardening your arteries, perhaps ultimately leading to a heart attack or stroke.
“In women it is thought that a greater portion of the abdominal fat is constituted by subcutaneous fat which is relatively harmless,” she said.

However, the lower numbers of women included in the study meant the findings had less “statistical power” and more research was needed to draw definite conclusions, Mohammadi said.

The risk of cardiovascular disease like heart attacks or strokes is considered to be higher in those with a waist measurement of above 94 cm in men and above 80 cm in women, according to the World Health Organization. The risk is thought to be substantially increased in men with a waist wider than 102 cm and 88 cm in women.
The authors said that belly fat was best tackled by a healthy diet and regular exercise. Earlier studies have shown that regular moderate cardio, like walking for at least 30 minutes a day, can help fight a widening waistline. Strength training with weights may also help but spot exercises like sit-ups that can tighten abs won’t touch visceral fat.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/health-news/your-waist-size-may-be-more-important-than-weight-for-multiple-heart-attack-risk/ar-BBZa1qy?ocid=spartanntp

10 signs you don’t drink enough water

Slide 1 of 11: There’s no telling how much water you should drink each day. Health professionals have differing opinions, and the amount your body needs can vary depending on a rainbow of factors including your weight and activity level. So how are you supposed to know if you’re not getting enough? There are the obvious indicators like extreme thirst and dry mouth, but if you’ve experienced any of these 10 symptoms, you might be dangerously dehydrated.

 

There’s no telling how much water you should drink each day. Health professionals have differing opinions, and the amount your body needs can vary depending on a rainbow of factors including your weight and activity level. So how are you supposed to know if you’re not getting enough? There are the obvious indicators like extreme thirst and dry mouth, but if you’ve experienced any of these 10 symptoms, you might be dangerously dehydrated.  Article by Taylor Rock of The Daily Meal.

 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/10-signs-you-dont-drink-enough-water/ss-AAE1JtE?ocid=spartanntp#image=11

HEADACHY ?

 

 

 

For that simple headache:

Gatorade Can Be Used as a Headache Remedy

For that really bad migraine:

Courtesy of 1000LifeHacks.com

No guarantees, but please comment if it works for you !

9 Times Ibuprofen Could Be Dangerous

Slide 1 of 10: Die-hard athletes sometimes take an Advil before, say, a long run. But that may be, at best, a waste of time and potentially harmful at worst. 'Painkillers are a chemical Band-Aid,' says Lillie Rosenthal, DO, a medical advisory board member at MedShadow Foundation, a nonprofit group that educates patients on long-term drug safety and efficacy. 'You have to listen to the body and figure out the cause,' says Dr. Rosenthal, who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation. With ibuprofen muting the pain, you may not know if you're overexerting yourself or it may prevent you from slowing down or getting help when it's needed.

What's more, if you're working out extremely hard—as in ultramarathon hard—taking ibuprofen can exacerbate the kidney damage that's sparked by rigorous exercise. In a 2017 BMJ Emergency Medicine paper, ultramarathoners who took ibuprofen over the course of 50 miles (for a total of 1200 mg) were about 18 percent more likely to experience acute kidney injury than those who took a placebo. Extreme workouts tax the kidneys by drawing blood to the muscles for a prolonged period of time; taking ibuprofen—which reduces prostaglandins, which then, in turn, diverts blood flow from the kidney—exerts a double whammy on the kidneys.

What's more, an ibuprofen may not even be that helpful. In a small 2015 study published in the Journal of Athletic Training, researchers rounded up experienced runners, had them do a baseline workout, and then induced muscle pain in their legs through strenuous exercise (ouch!). Later, the subjects were either given ibuprofen or placebo and then told to do a follow-up workout. The difference? Essentially, none. One possible reason, say the researchers, may be that the drug's effect on the heart may compromise oxygen uptake and negate any gains in pain reduction.

Athletes call it ‘Vitamin I.’ Women with menstrual cramps depend upon it. But scientists are beginning to realize that ibuprofen may not be as benign as we thought.

WARNINGS:

If you have gastrointestinal issues

If you’re pregnant

If you have a UTI–Urinary tract infection

If you have arthritis–Has a negative effect on the stomach

If you enjoy wine or cocktails

If you’re about to tackle a really tough workout–You may not realize your over-exerting yourself if you first take a nsaid.

If you have asthma–A nsaid could exacerbate it.

 

Always check with your primary healthcare provider.  Be safe !

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/9-times-ibuprofen-wont-work—and-could-be-dangerous/ss-AAD9V76?ocid=spartanntp#image=2

 

 

‘Harmless’ Habits That Are Aging You Faster Than You Can Imagine

Wow.  I had no idea.  Some of these habits, like drinking thru a straw, are ingrained into our culture.  BTW, this photo collage is not meant to scare you, just make you aware that some of the choices we make may not kill us, but age us terribly.  Read on:

 

Slide 1 of 22: Barring factors outside of our control, the key to living a long life is simple -- at first glance. Eat a healthy and balanced diet, exercise regularly, don’t smoke, and get between six and eight hours of sleep. But the reality is a lot more complicated. 
Repetitive facial movements such as frowning and drinking through a straw have been known to be one of at least 20 mistakes people make that may be aging them. There is so much more we do during the day that affects our longevity. What we do and with our body has a significant impact on how we feel -- and how we look. 
24/7 Tempo consulted a neurologist, a dermatologist, and a chiropractor to identify 21 habits most people think are harmless and even healthy that actually speed up aging. We also reviewed information from organizations specializing in skin health such as the International Dermal Institute.
The skin is one of the first organs that will show signs of aging -- wrinkles, fine lines, dryness, discoloration -- but it’s not the only one. Our brain, lungs, eyes, and ears can also be damaged by what we do or don’t do. (Biting your nails and other habits could be a sign of a serious problem with them.)

 

Barring factors outside of our control, the key to living a long life is simple — at first glance. Eat a healthy and balanced diet, exercise regularly, don’t smoke, and get between six and eight hours of sleep each night. But the reality is a lot more complicated.

Repetitive facial movements such as frowning and drinking through a straw have been known to be one of at least 20 mistakes people make that may be aging them. There is so much more we do during the day that affects our longevity. What we do with our bodies has a significant impact on how we feel — and how we look.

24/7 Tempo consulted a neurologist, a dermatologist, and a chiropractor to identify 21 habits most people think are harmless and even healthy that actually speed up aging. We also reviewed information from organizations specializing in skin health such as the International Dermal Institute.

The skin is one of the first organs that will show signs of aging — wrinkles, fine lines, dryness, discoloration — but it’s not the only one. Our brain, lungs, eyes, and ears can also be damaged by what we do or don’t do.

To read the entire article, go to:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/harmless-habits-that-are-aging-you-faster-than-you-can-imagine/ss-AACvH7k?ocid=spartanntp#image=1

Eating Cannabis Also Carries Risks, Warn Doctors: ‘Legal Does Not Necessarily Mean Safe’

On January 1, it became legal to buy and consume marijuana in Illinois.  Many thousands were not celebrating bringing in the new year, but standing in winding lines that night to purchase legal pot.  Many dispensaries have seen their stock of pot completely depleted forcing them to sell just to medically approved users.

Kashmira Gander of Newsweek has reported that doctors are warning those new to the herb of the dangers of eating cannabis products including those infamous brownies.
a hand holding a plant: A stock image shows a cannabis leaf.
She writes doctors were concerned some people may be unaware that it can take longer for the effects of cannabis to kick in when it is eaten, and how long it can last.When cannabis is smoked, it can take just a few minutes for a person to feel stoned. But it can take up to four hours for the psychoactive effects to begin when it is ingested, and they can last on for more than eight hours, doctors warned. This delay can heighten a person’s risk of taking more than they had planned when the high doesn’t immediately hit.

Children and older adults, meanwhile, could mistake edibles for regular candies or other food and drinks, the doctors said. This is highlighted by the 70 percent spike in calls reporting children consuming edibles to Colorado’s state poison control center between 2013 to 2017, after the drug was legalized. Older people using cannabis are at greater risk of low blood-pressure related falls, suffering from thinking problems, issues with their heart rate, and interactions with drugs they take for existing conditions, the authors wrote.

Doctors told Newsweek: “Those who choose to use cannabis should remember that legal does not necessarily mean safe. Depending on an individual’s health, the nature of the product, or the means by which it is consumed, the consumption of cannabis in edible forms can have both short and long-term health impacts.  “Some of those impacts can also differ markedly from the consumption of cannabis in lit forms, particularly in terms of time to onset and risk for overconsumption,” he said.

 

So my fellow Illinoisans, be cautious if embracing this mind-altering herb whether in lit form or consumed.

 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/health-news/eating-cannabis-also-carries-risks-warn-doctors-legal-does-not-necessarily-mean-safe/ar-BBYEkde?ocid=spartanntp