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Here’s What It Means If You Have Ridges on Your Nails

Image result for Vertical Ridges On Nails
Photo by Medical News

Fingernails seem like a pretty uneventful body part. They grow. You cut them. Maybe paint them. And that’s about it. But in reality, your nails can give you a glimpse into your overall health. If something is going on in your body, your nails could start to change, sometimes developing ridges. Depending on what the ridges in fingernails look like, you might want to schedule a visit to the doctor.

What do vertical nail ridges mean?

Lines running from the bottom of the nail to the tip are the most common form of ridges in fingernails, affecting about 20 percent of adults. In the vast majority of cases, it’s just a sign of aging, says Ivy Lee, MD, a board-certified dermatologist based in Pasadena, California. Fingernails are made mostly of keratin, a protein also found in the hair and outer layer of skin. In the same ways that the skin gets drier and the hair feels rougher, the nails also change with age because the body has a harder time retaining moisture.

Other nail changes

But if you see other changes in the nails, like splitting or a color change, you might want to consult a doctor, says Dr. Lee. In rare cases, ridges in fingernails could be a sign of anemia, rheumatoid arthritis, or cardiovascular problems, according to research in the Indian Dermatology Online Journal. A single ridge in the middle of the nail, for instance, could be a sign of a nutrient deficiency like protein or folic acid. Keep an eye out for these other 11 health secrets your hands are trying to tell you.

What do horizontal nail ridges mean?

Ridges in fingernails that run side to side are less common and might give you more pause. Also known as Beau’s lines, they could signal disease or just be a remnant of an old injury, says Dr. Lee. “They arise because there is a temporary stop in nail growth in the proximal nail matrix, where the fingernail is made,” she says. “They are most often benign and due to mechanical trauma: manicures, jamming your finger in the door, etc.”

Sometimes, though, they point to a skin disease like eczema, psoriasis, or chronic paronychia (an infection of the nail folds that makes the skin swollen and red), so inspect your skin and fingertips for signs of redness and rash. Your dermatologist might be able to offer a treatment option. While you’re at it, look into these things your nails can reveal about your health.

A symptom of bigger health issues

Ridges in nails aren’t all about the skin—they can also be a sign of other systemic problems. For instance, an over or underactive thyroid can affect the hormones in charge of nail, skin, and hair growth, resulting in ridged nails in some cases. If all 20 finger- and toenails develop Beau’s lines at the same time, it could even be an infection like pneumonia, mumps, or syphilis, or even a problem with the heart, liver, or kidneys, per the research in the Indian Dermatology Online Journal. Particularly if your ridged nails have also become thinner, split, discolored, or misshapen, schedule a visit with your dermatologist pronto to get to the bottom of the problem, says Dr.

Article written by Marissa Laliberte for The Healthy

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/beauty/heres-what-it-means-if-you-have-ridges-on-your-nails/ar-BB14J9pz?ocid=spartanntp

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A restaurant is testing plastic ‘shield pods’ to keep diners safe

a person sitting at a table in a room: A man and a woman demonstrate dining under a plastic shield Wednesday, May 27, 2020 in a restaurant of Paris. As restaurants in food-loving France prepare to reopen, some are investing in lampshade-like plastic shields to protect diners from the virus. The strange-looking contraptions are among experiments restaurants are trying around the world as they try to lure back clientele while keeping them virus-free. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus) Associated Press
© Associated Press A man and a woman demonstrate dining under a plastic shield Wednesday, May 27, 2020 in a restaurant of Paris. As restaurants in food-loving France prepare to reopen, some are investing in lampshade-like plastic shields to protect diners from the virus. The strange-looking contraptions are among experiments restaurants are trying around the world as they try to lure back clientele while keeping them virus-free. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus) Associated Press

  • Plastic cones suspended over the faces of patrons might be the new trend for restaurants reopening their doors during the pandemic. 
  • The Plex’Eat is a plastic shield created by French designer Christophe Gernigon to block germs from passing from one restaurant patron to the next. 
  • Gernigon told the Associated Press he already has over 200 inquiries from restaurants for Plex’Eats in five countries. 
  • Bars and restaurants face unique complications in reopening because customers can’t eat without removing their masks.

Clear plastic cones hang suspended above customers at Parisian restaurant H.A.N.D. this week in a creative attempt to keep patrons safe as eateries across Europe, and across the world, reopen their doors. 

The plastic shields are a prototype called Plex’Eat created by French designer Christophe Gernigon. They are made of plexiglass and resemble lampshades.

Gernigon told the Associated Press he was inspired after visiting a store in Bangkok “with three individual domes with chairs where people would sit and listen to music.”

Article by clopez@businessinsider.com (Canela López) for Insider ©

(I just hope their kidding !)

https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/a-restaurant-is-testing-plastic-shield-pods-to-keep-diners-safe/ar-BB14J7cV?ocid=spartandhp

The Best Kettlebells to Bring Your Workout to the Next Level

By Stefani Sassos, MS, RDN, CSO, CDN

  • Slide 1 of 7: If you're looking to enhance your workout, be it cardio or strength training, look no further than the kettlebell. This functional piece of equipment provides for a total-body workout, allowing you to work both those larger and smaller muscle groups. Kettlebell exercises require a ton of technique and control, but when done properly can help you build up endurance, stamina, and strength. Kettlebells can be a bit costly, but the investment is worth it since you can perform a wide variety of exercises with just one piece of equipment. Lauren Jenai, CrossFit co-founder and CEO of Manifest, says you want to consider strength, balance, durability, surface, and base when purchasing kettlebells. "It is important that a kettlebell has a clean, void-free surface that is not too rough on your hands," says Jenai. Our top picks for the best kettlebells focused on durability, grip comfort, ease of use through functional workout movements, and overall size.
  • Slide 7 of 7: $27.00Shop NowDesigned by powerlifter Donnie Thompson, this mix between a dumbbell and kettlebell allows for better handling and can help optimize performance in certain movements, such as chest presses and pushups. We like the flat bottom for stability and the fact that design allows more load distribution through the center of the weight. They don't take up a ton of space and even look nice sitting in your home.

If you’re looking to enhance your workout, be it cardio or strength training, look no further than the kettlebell. This functional piece of equipment provides for a total-body workout, allowing you to work both those larger and smaller muscle groups. Kettlebell exercises require a ton of technique and control, but when done properly can help you build up endurance, stamina, and strength. Kettlebells can be a bit costly, but the investment is worth it since you can perform a wide variety of exercises with just one piece of equipment. Lauren Jenai, CrossFit co-founder and CEO of Manifest, says you want to consider strength, balance, durability, surface, and base when purchasing kettlebells. “It is important that a kettlebell has a clean, void-free surface that is not too rough on your hands,” says Jenai. Our top picks for the best kettlebells focused on durability, grip comfort, ease of use through functional workout movements, and overall size. © Melpomenem – Getty Images

Slide 2 of 7: $32.00Shop NowThese Rogue Kettlebells are a staple in CrossFit gyms around the world, and for good reason. They are a single-piece casting kettlebell made from first run iron ore, and have a matte black powder coat finish that makes them quite comfortable. Jenai likes this pick and says, "As far as home use, I particularly like the fact that these kettlebells are made with a wide flat machined base. This base sits flat on the floor and does not wobble, like other raw casted kettlebells, which keep down wear and tear on floors. The attractive finish on these kettlebells is not an eyesore and does not distract from home or home gym decor."
© Rogue

1) Single Piece Casting Kettlebell

$32.00

Shop Now

These Rogue Kettlebells are a staple in CrossFit gyms around the world, and for good reason. They are a single-piece casting kettlebell made from first run iron ore, and have a matte black powder coat finish that makes them quite comfortable. Jenai likes this pick and says, “As far as home use, I particularly like the fact that these kettlebells are made with a wide flat machined base. This base sits flat on the floor and does not wobble, like other raw casted kettlebells, which keep down wear and tear on floors. The attractive finish on these kettlebells is not an eyesore and does not distract from home or home gym decor.”

Slide 3 of 7: $89.99Shop NowThis well-rounded kettlebell pick comes in sizes 7 through 45lbs. We like the sturdy iron construction and comfortable handle. The smooth vinyl coating on the base of the kettlebell makes it a good choice for home gyms as it won't scratch your flooring. The size is relatively compact and appropriate for each weight, not overly cumbersome in any regard, and excellent for ballistic movements like swings. I've owned the 35lb GoFit Kettlebell for over 10 years, and with semi-regular use, it still is in great condition and looks practically new.
© Go Fit

2) Vinyl Coated Kettlebell

$89.99

Shop Now

This well-rounded kettlebell pick comes in sizes 7 through 45lbs. We like the sturdy iron construction and comfortable handle. The smooth vinyl coating on the base of the kettlebell makes it a good choice for home gyms as it won’t scratch your flooring. The size is relatively compact and appropriate for each weight, not overly cumbersome in any regard, and excellent for ballistic movements like swings. I’ve owned the 35lb GoFit Kettlebell for over 10 years, and with semi-regular use, it still is in great condition and looks practically new.

Slide 4 of 7: $25.49Shop NowWe tested this kettlebell designed by Tone It Up founders Katrina Scott and Karena Dawn through a series of workouts, and it performed especially well with toning exercises. The material itself is smooth and prevents your hand from slipping, and the grip is very comfortable throughout movements. Some kettlebells we tested that were lightweight had a very large and overly cumbersome shape, but this Tone It Up kettlebell is compact and an appropriate size for 8lbs. The lightweight is perfect for sculpting workouts and also for beginners looking to start kettlebell work.
© Tone It Up

3) Tone It Up Kettlebell

$25.49

Shop Now

We tested this kettlebell designed by Tone It Up founders Katrina Scott and Karena Dawn through a series of workouts, and it performed especially well with toning exercises. The material itself is smooth and prevents your hand from slipping, and the grip is very comfortable throughout movements. Some kettlebells we tested that were lightweight had a very large and overly cumbersome shape, but this Tone It Up kettlebell is compact and an appropriate size for 8lbs. The lightweight is perfect for sculpting workouts and also for beginners looking to start kettlebell work.

Slide 5 of 7: $229.00Shop NowWe were very impressed by this smart kettlebell from JAXJOX given its special features and integration with your smartphone (their app allows you to track reps and workouts, and also connects with Apple Health). Kettlebell Connect is adjustable, and weights range from 12-42 lbs in 6lb increments. For the price, you're essentially getting six kettlebells in one. We also love that instead of getting different size kettlebells, which can take up a lot of space in a home gym, you're able to use this space-efficient product that also has a sleek, modern look. Another plus is that the JAXJOX app features a variety of kettlebell workouts to get you started. The grip is quite comfortable as well, and we found it worked best in strict workout movements.
© JaxJox

4) Kettlebell Connect

$229.00

Shop Now

We were very impressed by this smart kettlebell from JAXJOX given its special features and integration with your smartphone (their app allows you to track reps and workouts, and also connects with Apple Health). Kettlebell Connect is adjustable, and weights range from 12-42 lbs in 6lb increments. For the price, you’re essentially getting six kettlebells in one. We also love that instead of getting different size kettlebells, which can take up a lot of space in a home gym, you’re able to use this space-efficient product that also has a sleek, modern look. Another plus is that the JAXJOX app features a variety of kettlebell workouts to get you started. The grip is quite comfortable as well, and we found it worked best in strict workout movements.

Slide 6 of 7: $84.95Shop NowNot only do these primal kettlebells from Onnit make a statement in your home gym, but they are actually quite functional. With a solid iron build, they hold up very well and have a comfortable, yet sturdy grip. The size is relatively compact given the weight, and the design makes you want to take your workout into beast mode. It's ideal for swings and deadlifts, but it's not the best for movements overhead such as snatches or presses given its asymmetry.
© Onnit

5) Primal Kettlebells

$84.95

Shop Now

Not only do these primal kettlebells from Onnit make a statement in your home gym, but they are actually quite functional. With a solid iron build, they hold up very well and have a comfortable, yet sturdy grip. The size is relatively compact given the weight, and the design makes you want to take your workout into beast mode. It’s ideal for swings and deadlifts, but it’s not the best for movements overhead such as snatches or presses given its asymmetry.

Slide 7 of 7: $27.00Shop NowDesigned by powerlifter Donnie Thompson, this mix between a dumbbell and kettlebell allows for better handling and can help optimize performance in certain movements, such as chest presses and pushups. We like the flat bottom for stability and the fact that design allows more load distribution through the center of the weight. They don't take up a ton of space and even look nice sitting in your home.
© Rogue

6) Thompson Fatbells

$27.00

Shop Now

Designed by powerlifter Donnie Thompson, this mix between a dumbbell and kettlebell allows for better handling and can help optimize performance in certain movements, such as chest presses and pushups. We like the flat bottom for stability and the fact that design allows more load distribution through the center of the weight. They don’t take up a ton of space and even look nice sitting in your home.

Source:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/fitness/the-best-kettlebells-to-bring-your-workout-to-the-next-level/ss-BB14G7ui?ocid=spartanntp#image=1

7 Signs You Shouldn’t Step Foot into a Store

By Sarah Crow for BestLife

Life is slowly returning to something resembling “normal” amid the coronavirus pandemic, with many states gradually reopening businesses to the delight of workers and patrons alike. However, just because some of your favorite places are open again doesn’t necessarily mean it’s safe to go inside. If you want to protect yourself on your next outing, you have to check for certain markers that indicate the business is following guidelines. To help you know what to avoid in a store, look out for these surefire signs that you should head for the door.

Slide 1 of 8: Life is slowly returning to something resembling "normal" amid the coronavirus pandemic, with many states gradually reopening businesses to the delight of workers and patrons alike. However, just because some of your favorite places are open again doesn't necessarily mean it's safe to go inside. If you want to protect yourself on your next outing, you have to check for certain markers that indicate the business is following guidelines. To help you know what to avoid in a store, look out for these surefire signs that you should head for the door. And for more insight into how shopping is changing, check out these 7 Things You Won't See at Retail Stores Ever Again After Coronavirus.

1. They are accepting returns of personal items.

Since the onset of the pandemic, many stores have been more discerning about what items they’ll accept as returns. While some big box stores, like Walmart, aren’t taking returns of items like food, clothing, paper goods, cleaning supplies, pharmacy products, and health and beauty items, other stores haven’t adopted such strict policies yet.

In particular, Enchanta Jenkins, MD, MHA, says that if personal products that could have come into contact with other shoppers’ bodies—like clothing or cosmetics—are being returned, that could be putting shoppers in peril. She suggests that you avoid any store with overly flexible return policies until those guidelines are updated.

2. They’re not offering disinfectant wipes at the entrance.

One of the clearest signs a store is prioritizing its customers’ well-being can be found right at the entrance. If a store offers shopping carts and baskets to those browsing its aisles but doesn’t have disinfecting wipes available, it’s likely to be a hotbed of germs.

In stores that don’t offer these to shoppers, “germs [and] coronavirus are being transferred on carts and other objects, especially plastic items that can store COVID-19 for up to 72 hours,” says Jenkins.

3. They’re not enforcing capacity limits.

If a store looks packed to the gills and nobody seems to be limiting the number of people entering, you should probably head home instead of heading inside. “By having too many people in the store, physical distancing cannot be enforced and thus increases the risk of transmitting germs and viruses,” explains Jenkins.

4. They’re not putting down social distancing markers.

While you may think you’re capable of eyeballing your distance from other shoppers, stores that are taking coronavirus safety seriously should have markers down to encourage social distancing at checkout counters and in other high-traffic areas. The common notion has been that six feet is a long enough distance to make it difficult for airborne respiratory droplets with traces of the virus to land on other shoppers. As Jenkins notes, “markers are a visual reminder to clients to stay two arms’ lengths, or six feet, from others.”

5. Employees aren’t wearing masks.

While wearing masks may not necessarily prevent the wearer from getting sick, they will keep employees’ potentially-contaminated respiratory droplets off merchandise, displays, and shoppers, meaning you’re less likely to pick something up while shopping. So, “if you see employees in a store have face masks hanging down past their face or they don’t have masks at all, it’s not a good sign,” says Seema Sarin, MD, director of lifestyle medicine at EHE Health.

6. They’re still offering samples.

It may have once been fun to get a free sample of a snack at the supermarket, but today, seeing any kind of communal food in a store should have you walking the other way. Food sample displays mean “germs are easily transferred due to multiple hands in one dish or bowl,” explains Jenkins. She says that providing samples during and shortly after the pandemic is “definitely a bad idea.”

7. They have an open salad bar.

If a grocery store is actually working hard to keep its customers safe, their salad bar should be shut down—at least for the time being. “Avoid eating from open food containers, as they can easily accumulate germs from people passing around [them],” says Sarin, who deems open areas like salad bars “dangerous” during the pandemic.

Stay well my friends.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/lifestyle-buzz/7-signs-you-shouldnt-step-foot-into-a-store/ss-BB14qw6c?ocid=spartandhp#image=1

These Are the Safest Ways to Disinfect Your Kids’ Toys

Slide 1 of 6: To your kids, there's nothing as special as a shiny new toy. But as you come to find, the novelty wears off quickly—almost as quickly as the toy gets dirty. And while the toy might lose its immaculate sparkle, there's something more to worry about: It also becomes a breeding ground for bacteria and germs. The key is to keep your kids' toys as clean as possible, so they can continue to play and stay healthy. We consulted the experts to learn the safest ways to clean toys—from the softest of stuffed animals to everyday baby toys (the ones that inevitably end up in their mouths at least twice a day). Keep reading and discover the most effective ways to disinfect kids' toys. And if you're wondering what products to use, here are 5 Disinfectants That Kill Coronavirus in 30 Seconds or Less.
By Jen Anderson of BestLife

These Are the Safest Ways to Disinfect Your Kids’ Toys

To your kids, there’s nothing as special as a shiny new toy. But as you come to find, the novelty wears off quickly—almost as quickly as the toy gets dirty. And while the toy might lose its immaculate sparkle, there’s something more to worry about: It also becomes a breeding ground for bacteria and germs. The key is to keep your kids’ toys as clean as possible, so they can continue to play and stay healthy. We consulted the experts to learn the safest ways to clean toys—from the softest of stuffed animals to everyday baby toys (the ones that inevitably end up in their mouths at least twice a day). Keep reading and discover the most effective ways to disinfect kids’ toys. And if you’re wondering what products to use, here are 5 Disinfectants That Kill Coronavirus in 30 Seconds or Less.

1. Use your dishwasher.

The best way to clean your kids’ toys: sanitize, and sanitize often—around once a week if you can. That’s where your dishwasher comes in. “If your dishwasher has a ‘sanitize’ button or setting, you’re home free,” explains Curtis Eggemeyer, CEO of Lemi Shine. “Or just put everything on the top shelf and run a hot, short cycle to get rid of the gunk and germs.”

Of course, this comes with its limitations. Always consider the toy’s label to make sure it won’t melt, discolor, or somehow get damaged by the wash, advises Jennie Varney, brand manager for Molly Maid. On the other hand, to go the extra mile with toys that are safe to toss in the dishwasher, consider using bleach. And to learn more about what can and can’t be sanitized, check out our article: Is It Safe to Sanitize Your Phone? Here’s What You Can’t Disinfect.

2. Toss them in the washing machine.

For softer toys, such as stuffed animals, blankets, and fabric books, give them a run through the washing machine and dryer, using simple soap and water. “Chances are, they’ll come out just fine,” says Kadi Dulude, owner at Wizard of Homes NYC. “Just watch out for parts that are glued on or glittery. Don’t wash those toys.” If you’re worried about tossing them in the dryer, you can line dry or lay flat—just keep them away from your kids until they’re completely dry. And for more on doing laundry during the pandemic, make sure you know these 7 Coronavirus Laundry Tips You Need to Start Following.

3. Hand wash baby toys nightly.

A weekly clean is fine for kids’ toys, but baby toys are a different story. You’ll want to wash anything they play with nightly. “Anything they get their hands on goes directly into their mouth,” explains Jan M. Dougherty, author of The Lost Art of House Cleaning. “When my kids were babies, I simply washed all their stuff in the sink every night after they went to bed.” Just use a gentle soap and water to create a bath for all the toys.

Slide 5 of 6: Sunlight might be called the best disinfectant, but that doesn't mean it's enough. With warmer days ahead, your kids will likely spend more time outside—in the yard, in the park, and certainly playing with outdoor toys. "Use wipes to quickly tackle bigger items like sand tables, bikes, and play furniture," suggests Eggemeyer. "Give balls, shovels, and small outdoor toys a regular wash down in a tub of warm water with a little concentrated dish soap." This will make sure they stay in tip-top shape, too, so they're safe to play with all summer long. And to make sure you're avoiding the wrong cleaning products, discover 7 Cleaning Supplies That Don't Actually Kill Coronavirus.

4. Wipe down all outdoor toys.

Sunlight might be called the best disinfectant, but that doesn’t mean it’s enough. With warmer days ahead, your kids will likely spend more time outside—in the yard, in the park, and certainly playing with outdoor toys. “Use wipes to quickly tackle bigger items like sand tables, bikes, and play furniture,” suggests Eggemeyer. “Give balls, shovels, and small outdoor toys a regular wash down in a tub of warm water with a little concentrated dish soap.” This will make sure they stay in tip-top shape, too, so they’re safe to play with all summer long. And to make sure you’re avoiding the wrong cleaning products, discover 7 Cleaning Supplies That Don’t Actually Kill Coronavirus.

5. Toss the toys you can’t disinfect.

Some toys are past the point of no return—particularly the ones that can’t be sanitized effectively. Instead of trying to clean them, it might be best to toss them and replace them with something safe and new. Ultimately, it’s up to your discretion, but Varney suggests, “If the toy is broken and has a sharp edge, or has become a choking hazard, throw it away. If it simply looks dirty or ragged, but can still be disinfected, there’s no need to throw it away.”

Article courtesy of BestLife and Jen Anderson

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/lifestyle-general/these-are-the-safest-ways-to-disinfect-your-kids-toys/ss-BB14taGR?ocid=spartandhp#image=1

Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Reef-Safe Sunscreen

It’s finally here, warm weather.  Got sunscreen ?  Please read this article by Garrett Munce for MensHealth.  It may open your eyes to what some sunscreens are doing to destroy coral reefs.

You probably know by now that you need to be wearing sunscreen; your mother told you, your doctor has told you, hell, even we at Men’s Health have told you (many times). According to the American Academy of Dermatology, wearing sunscreen is the best protection you can get against sun damage that can lead to skin cancer. But as you slather yourself in SPF (and reapply every two hours as directed, right?), you may not have thought about how what you choose to protect your body from the sun could also have a role in protecting, or deteriorating, the environment around you.

In 2015, a group of scientists including Dr. Craig Downs, PhD, Executive Director of the Haereticus Environmental Laboratory, was tasked by the Federal Government to figure out why coral reefs in the U.S. Virgin Islands were dying. After ruling out the usual suspects like “sewage, fuel, pesticides, and road runoff,” says Downs, they realized that there were high concentrations of chemicals found in sunscreens in the water of the highly popular tourist beaches. Their subsequent study found that there was over 14,000 tons of sunscreen in our oceans, which they have now been able to directly link to irreversible damage to coral and other marine life.

Following the growing amount of evidence that what sunscreens we put on our bodies can have a devastating effect on the environment around us, Hawaii became the first state to ban the sale of sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate in 2018, two known endocrine disrupting chemical ingredients that have been shown to drastically affect ocean life. Key West followed in 2019 and around the same time the Food and Drug Administration proposed a new rule to regulate common chemicals found in sunscreens, including oxybenzone and octinoxate, pending updated testing. (Though it should be noted that the FDA is more concerned with these chemicals’ effects on humans, rather than the environment).

As a result, you’ve probably noticed more sunscreens promoting themselves as “reef safe”. But what exactly does that mean and should you make the switch? It’s complicated.

How Exactly Can Sunscreen Harm The Environment?

Ultimately it comes down to what kind of sunscreen it is. “The issue is more with chemical sunscreens because those are the ones that have been shown to accumulate [in the water],” says cosmetic chemist Ron Robinson, whereas mineral-based sunscreens like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide don’t, at least not in the same way. “[Chemicals] get absorbed by some of the marine life and cause damage and even death. Minerals sink to the bottom.” According to Downs, coral bleaching is the most visible effect of damage but it goes way beyond that. These chemicals can affect all aspects of an ocean ecosystem—from fertility issues in sea urchins and fish to killing off seaweed and other marine plant life. “Sunscreens are incredible herbicides, worse than commercial herbicides,” says Downs.

How To Choose A Reef Safe Sunscreen

One of the biggest reasons people stay away from mineral sunscreens is how they look (chalky) and feel (filmy) on their skin. That may have been true for the old-school zinc, but now formulas are smoother and easier to rub in, though may still take some getting used to. “Buy a few different sunscreens and try them all to figure out which one your skin likes best because all skin is different,” says Bhanusali. “People may have reactions to certain ingredients, so you have to play around with it.” Always choose a sunscreen that is at least broad spectrum SPF 30, as advised by the American Academy of Dermatology, and look for versions that are water resistant. Be wary of any product that doesn’t list an SPF rating, since those are substantiated and regulated by the FDA, even if some of the ingredients are not. And if you can’t find a mineral sunscreen you like, but still want to be reef safe, consider UPF clothing which still protects your skin from UV rays.

Check out the 12 best reef-safe sunscreens. We’d be willing to bet you’ll find one you like so much, you won’t even miss your old chemical screen. The reefs will thank you.

Slide 1 of 13: You probably know by now that you need to be wearing sunscreen; your mother told you, your doctor has told you, hell, even we at Men’s Health have told you (many times). According to the American Academy of Dermatology, wearing sunscreen is the best protection you can get against sun damage that can lead to skin cancer. But as you slather yourself in SPF (and reapply every two hours as directed, right?), you may not have thought about how what you choose to protect your body from the sun could also have a role in protecting, or deteriorating, the environment around you.In 2015, a group of scientists including Dr. Craig Downs, PhD, Executive Director of the Haereticus Environmental Laboratory, was tasked by the Federal Government to figure out why coral reefs in the U.S. Virgin Islands were dying. After ruling out the usual suspects like “sewage, fuel, pesticides, and road runoff,” says Downs, they realized that there were high concentrations of chemicals found in sunscreens in the water of the highly popular tourist beaches. Their subsequent study found that there was over 14,000 tons of sunscreen in our oceans, which they have now been able to directly link to irreversible damage to coral and other marine life.Following the growing amount of evidence that what sunscreens we put on our bodies can have a devastating effect on the environment around us, Hawaii became the first state to ban the sale of sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate in 2018, two known endocrine disrupting chemical ingredients that have been shown to drastically affect ocean life. Key West followed in 2019 and around the same time the Food and Drug Administration proposed a new rule to regulate common chemicals found in sunscreens, including oxybenzone and octinoxate, pending updated testing. (Though it should be noted that the FDA is more concerned with these chemicals’ effects on humans, rather than the environment). As a result, you’ve probably noticed more sunscreens promoting themselves as "reef safe". But what exactly does that mean and should you make the switch? It’s complicated.How Exactly Can Sunscreen Harm The Environment?Ultimately it comes down to what kind of sunscreen it is. “The issue is more with chemical sunscreens because those are the ones that have been shown to accumulate [in the water],” says cosmetic chemist Ron Robinson, whereas mineral-based sunscreens like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide don’t, at least not in the same way. “[Chemicals] get absorbed by some of the marine life and cause damage and even death. Minerals sink to the bottom.” According to Downs, coral bleaching is the most visible effect of damage but it goes way beyond that. These chemicals can affect all aspects of an ocean ecosystem—from fertility issues in sea urchins and fish to killing off seaweed and other marine plant life. “Sunscreens are incredible herbicides, worse than commercial herbicides,” says Downs. What’s The Difference Between Chemical and Mineral Sunscreens?“In the simplest terms, mineral [also called physical] sunscreens deflect UV rays and chemical sunscreens actually absorb them and use heat to break them apart,” says dermatologist Dhaval Bhanusali, MD. Physical sunscreens also tend to be natural, like zinc oxide or titanium dioxide, whereas chemical sunscreens are synthetic. The easiest way to think about it is to picture the old-school lifeguards or surfers with pure white zinc on their noses. These physical blockers actually sit on top of skin, which is why dermatologists like Dr. Bhanusali actually prefer them. “They do a better job of protecting us, but the biggest issue is that people don’t always like them because they leave a barrier,” he says. That’s why chemical sunscreens were developed—they sink into skin easier and don’t usually leave a white, chalky cast. These days, however, formulations of mineral sunscreens are getting better and grind the minerals down to a microscopic size called nanoparticles to ensure they disappear on skin quicker and more easily without leaving a film or chalky look.But nanoparticles aren’t perfect, even those of natural substances like zinc or titanium dioxide. “They tend to accumulate god knows where,” says Dr. Bhanusali. As manufacturers began to micronize particles smaller and smaller, “they went too far,” says Robinson. “There are potentially harmful effects as they seep into the skin,” which can be bad news for humans as well as marine life. “Nanoparticles still pose an increased toxicological risk because, just like in humans, they can be absorbed into the blood stream [of marine life],” says Downs. The impact is still being studied and may not be as extreme in some cases as chemical sunscreens, but is still something scientists like Downs are concerned about. “It’s the dose that makes the poison, so if you had 6,000 people go into [the same water] with nanosized zinc oxide, yes, I think there would be an impact,” he says.What Makes A Sunscreen Reef Safe?Keep in mind that “reef safe” is not a standardized term - it’s something come up by marketers. “Calling something reef safe implies you’ve actually tested that product on reef organisms and most companies don’t do that toxicity testing,” says Downs. When you see the words reef safe on a bottle, it usually just means it’s free from oxybenzone and octinoxate, which is a start but not the be-all-end-all. To really hedge your bets, you should look at the ingredients list and see if it’s a purely mineral sunscreen that contains zinc oxide and/or titanium dioxide (sometimes formulas will include other chemicals, like avobenzone) and whether it says the ingredients are nano or non-nano. To be as safe as possible, the sunscreen should contain only non-nano mineral sunscreens.There are some independent agencies who have set up their own certification and testing processes to help identify sunscreens that don’t contain harmful ingredients. Protect Land & Sea, which Downs oversees, tests sunscreens for 11 potentially harmful chemicals as well as a slew of other things like parabens and other preservatives. The Environmental Working Group also has rigorous standards in what they consider safe to use. Look for their logos on packages to help easily identify products that they deem safe.Can Using a Reef-Safe Sunscreen Really Make a Difference?Cynics among us may wonder if saving marine life could be as simple as switching their sunscreen. There are multiple factors to consider, according to Dr. Bhanusali, like climate change and pollution, which also contribute to the deterioration of coral reefs and nothing is black and white. “The only thing that’s non-negotiable,” he says, “is that you have to wear something because extended UV damage over time can lead to skin cancers.” And if you’re still unconvinced, consider this: physical sunscreens can actually protect you better from the sun’s rays. Mineral ingredients like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are broad spectrum protectors, which means they protect from UVA and UVB rays (not all chemical sunscreens protect you from both). So switching to a reef safe sunscreen could do your body good as well as the ocean.Basically, says Robinson, you have to make the decision for yourself. “If you’re going swimming in the ocean, I would choose a product that is reef safe,” he says. “If you’re going to the beach and laying out, it doesn’t matter as much.” But consider that, as Downs says, “the poison is in the dose.” The harmful chemicals in sunscreens compound over time, so even one person making the switch could make a difference.How To Choose A Reef Safe SunscreenOne of the biggest reasons people stay away from mineral sunscreens is how they look (chalky) and feel (filmy) on their skin. That may have been true for the old-school zinc, but now formulas are smoother and easier to rub in, though may still take some getting used to. “Buy a few different sunscreens and try them all to figure out which one your skin likes best because all skin is different,” says Bhanusali. “People may have reactions to certain ingredients, so you have to play around with it.” Always choose a sunscreen that is at least broad spectrum SPF 30, as advised by the American Academy of Dermatology, and look for versions that are water resistant. Be wary of any product that doesn’t list an SPF rating, since those are substantiated and regulated by the FDA, even if some of the ingredients are not. And if you can’t find a mineral sunscreen you like, but still want to be reef safe, consider UPF clothing which still protects your skin from UV rays.Check out the 12 best reef-safe sunscreens. We’d be willing to bet you’ll find one you like so much, you won’t even miss your old chemical screen. The reefs will thank you.

Slide 2 of 13: $17.99Shop NowThis brilliant solve for gloopy, thick mineral sunscreen comes out of the can in a whipped cream consistency, which makes it easier to rub in and feel lighter on the skin. It still leaves a slight white cast at first, but is useful to see if you’ve missed a spot before it disappears.

Slide 3 of 13: $32.00Shop NowThis fragrance-free zinc sunscreen lotion is top rated by the EWG because of the 70% organic formula and high quality plant-derived ingredients. Since there’s no added fragrance, it’s gentle enough to use on sensitive or irritation-prone skin.

Those are just 3 of 12 reef-safe sunscreens.  Click here to see all 12:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/heres-everything-you-need-to-know-about-reef-safe-sunscreen/ss-BB14gAut?ocid=spartanntp#image=1

The 10 Best Hair Dyes for Men to Use at Home for a Natural Look

Slide 1 of 11: So you’ve decided to dye your hair. Rock on! There is literally nothing like hair dye in its ability to transform your look. And we’re not just talking about David Bowie red (or Frank Ocean green or Maluma pink, for that matter). Dying your hair can camouflage grays if you’re not thrilled with being a silver fox, it can make dull hair look brighter, and, yes, it can completely change how you see yourself in the mirror if that’s what you’re hoping to achieve. It can give you a whole new lease on life and who doesn’t want that? Before you ask, yes, men can dye their hair and plenty more do than you’d probably assume. There is no shame in dying your hair, it’s a personal choice after all, but there are some things to take into account. Like, are you going to go see a professional colorist or do it at home? Home hair dying can be daunting to the novice and the experienced dyer alike, but depending on the look you’re going for, can be just the ticket. Before you check out the best hair dye for men to color their hair at home, here are a few men’s hair coloring tips to keep in mind. What’s the Difference Between At-Home Hair Dye and Professional Salon Color?The main difference between hair dye you use at home and what a colorist would use in a salon is that it’s specifically designed to be easy to use. That’s great news for DIYers out there. “You don’t have to think about it,” says Phoebe Nathan, a colorist at Blackstones in New York City. “You take the developer, you take the color, mix it, apply it, done. They’re developed to be one size fits all.” Unlike the thicker products used in a salon setting, at-home hair dye is thinner to allow it to spread easily with your hands without the need for other tools or brushes. Unless you’re a trained colorist, in which case why are you even reading this article, dying your hair at home requires at-home dye. How to Choose a Hair Dye for the Color You WantThe first thing to consider when picking an at-home hair dye is, duh, what color you want your hair to be. Traditionally, when most guys considered dying their hair, it was to cover up grays and seamlessly blend in with their natural color, says Deb Rosenberg, lead colorist and AVP of Education at Color & Co. But now there is a big trend toward men becoming more experimental. “I’ve had more guys call up looking for vivid pastels,” she says as an example. If you’re trying to dye your hair a candy color that’s one thing (and requires more steps), but the average guy wants a dye job that looks as natural as possible. To achieve that, Nathan recommends choosing a hair dye that’s only a shade or two darker than your natural hair or one shade lighter. Anything more drastic is difficult to achieve on your own. Picking a color that is too dark is going to leave your hair looking unnaturally “inky” and too light runs the risk of turning your hair orange, she says. When you’re doing your own dye, keep it simple.How to Choose Between Permanent Hair Dye and Semi-Permanent Hair DyeThe other thing you need to consider is what kind of hair dye you want. Permanent hair dye will offer the most coverage but won’t ever wash out (it will fade after a few weeks of washing and to keep it vibrant, you’ll need a color-preserving shampoo). Semi-permanent or demi-permanent hair dyes will start fading almost immediately and will eventually wash out. It sounds like a waste of time, but these non-permanent dyes are ideal for gray blending—when you want to minimize grays but not cover them completely. “Gray blending looks the most believable,” says colorist George Papanikolas. He recommends using semi-permanent dye to “spot treat” areas like the temples where gray can cluster, instead of using a full-coverage dye on your whole head. How to Apply Hair Dye at HomeApplying all at-home hair dye is basically the same process. Shampoo a few days before and don’t put in any styling products. Read the directions on the package and gather the tools you need beforehand (including a timer, brushes, etc.) in the bathroom so you’re not scrambling around while dye is on your hair. Some brands require mixing and others don’t and regardless of which you choose, use gloves when you apply the dye and apply a protective barrier, like Vaseline around your hairline and ears (to repel stains). Apply the dye to dry hair and let it sit for the amount of time advised in the instructions. Then rinse it out and use a color-preserving shampoo like R+Co Gemstone Color Shampoo to stop the process. If you have short hair, be ready to do that all again in about four weeks and to keep your color looking as fresh as possible, reduce the amount you shampoo and use that color-safe shampoo when you do. But no matter what kind of hair dye you use at home, remember “it’s never going to 100% match your natural color because it’s a chemical reaction happening on your head,” notes Papnikolas. Manage your expectations from the beginning by understanding what your hair color goal is: simple gray coverage, a whole new head of pink hair, or somewhere in between. That will inform what kind of dye you choose. So, what hair dye should you choose? These are the best hair dyes for men according to professional hair colorists, no matter what look you want. Live free and dye hard and remember, always follow the directions.

© GoodLifeStudio

Before you ask, yes, men can dye their hair and plenty more do than you’d probably assume. There is no shame in dying your hair, it’s a personal choice after all, but there are some things to take into account. Like, are you going to go see a professional colorist or do it at home? Home hair dying can be daunting to the novice and the experienced dyer alike, but depending on the look you’re going for, can be just the ticket.

How to Choose a Hair Dye for the Color You Want

The first thing to consider when picking an at-home hair dye is, duh, what color you want your hair to be. Traditionally, when most guys considered dying their hair, it was to cover up grays and seamlessly blend in with their natural color, says Deb Rosenberg, lead colorist and AVP of Education at Color & Co. But now there is a big trend toward men becoming more experimental. “I’ve had more guys call up looking for vivid pastels,” she says as an example.

If you’re trying to dye your hair a candy color that’s one thing (and requires more steps), but the average guy wants a dye job that looks as natural as possible. To achieve that, Nathan recommends choosing a hair dye that’s only a shade or two darker than your natural hair or one shade lighter. Anything more drastic is difficult to achieve on your own. Picking a color that is too dark is going to leave your hair looking unnaturally “inky” and too light runs the risk of turning your hair orange, she says. When you’re doing your own dye, keep it simple.

How to Choose Between Permanent Hair Dye and Semi-Permanent Hair Dye

The other thing you need to consider is what kind of hair dye you want. Permanent hair dye will offer the most coverage but won’t ever wash out (it will fade after a few weeks of washing and to keep it vibrant, you’ll need a color-preserving shampoo). Semi-permanent or demi-permanent hair dyes will start fading almost immediately and will eventually wash out. It sounds like a waste of time, but these non-permanent dyes are ideal for gray blending—when you want to minimize grays but not cover them completely. “Gray blending looks the most believable,” says colorist George Papanikolas. He recommends using semi-permanent dye to “spot treat” areas like the temples where gray can cluster, instead of using a full-coverage dye on your whole head.

How to Apply Hair Dye at Home

Applying all at-home hair dye is basically the same process. Shampoo a few days before and don’t put in any styling products. Read the directions on the package and gather the tools you need beforehand (including a timer, brushes, etc.) in the bathroom so you’re not scrambling around while dye is on your hair. Some brands require mixing and others don’t and regardless of which you choose, use gloves when you apply the dye and apply a protective barrier, like Vaseline around your hairline and ears (to repel stains). Apply the dye to dry hair and let it sit for the amount of time advised in the instructions. Then rinse it out and use a color-preserving shampoo like R+Co Gemstone Color Shampoo to stop the process. If you have short hair, be ready to do that all again in about four weeks and to keep your color looking as fresh as possible, reduce the amount you shampoo and use that color-safe shampoo when you do.

But no matter what kind of hair dye you use at home, remember “it’s never going to 100% match your natural color because it’s a chemical reaction happening on your head,” notes Papnikolas. Manage your expectations from the beginning by understanding what your hair color goal is: simple gray coverage, a whole new head of pink hair, or somewhere in between. That will inform what kind of dye you choose.

So, what hair dye should you choose? These are the best hair dyes for men according to professional hair colorists, no matter what look you want. Live free and dye hard and remember, always follow the directions.

This article written by Garrett Munce for Men’sHealth contains descriptions of each product and where to buy it.  Just be careful.  Very, very careful !

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/beauty/the-10-best-hair-dyes-for-men-to-use-at-home-for-a-natural-look/ss-BB14beLm?ocid=spartanntp#image=1

 

4-Week walking workout plan for older people

 

a man standing next to a body of water © WANDER WOMEN COLLECTIVE/Getty Images

4-Week walking workout plan for older people

Overview:

This four-week challenge builds on itself each week, increasing in both time and intensity, to improve your overall health and fitness, and to help boost your mood.

Instructions:

  • Each workout will be done for a set period of time.
  • Workouts are set by week.
  • Glance at your guide for the day’s workout (depending on what week you’re in) before you head out on your own, or with family, or friends
  • Set a timer on your phone or watch at the start of each session so you’re able to keep track of the intervals
  • There are a set number of sessions, per week. Note that this is a minimum. You can do more if you’d like to and are able to.
  • Schedule your workouts into your calendar just before the start of each week to help hold yourself accountable.

Week 1 (3-4 total sessions this week)

20 Minutes

  • 5 Min: Warm up at an easy pace
  • 10 Min: Speed up to and maintain a brisk pace
  • 5 Min: Cool it down to an easy pace

Week 2 (3-4 total sessions this week)

25 Minutes

  • 10 Min: Warm up at an easy pace
  • 10 Min: Speed up to and maintain a brisk pace
  • 5 Min: Cool it down to an easy pace

Week 3 (4-5 total sessions this week)

30 Minutes

  • 10 Min: Warm up at an easy pace
  • 15 Min: Speed up to and maintain a brisk pace
  • 5 Min: Cool it down to an easy pace

Week 4 (5-6 total sessions this week)

40 Minutes

  • 15 Min: Warm up at an easy pace
  • 15 Min: Speed up to and maintain a brisk pace
  • 10 Min: Cool it down to an easy pace

Want to power up your walk a bit? Try incorporating these six steps from Rosante.

Six ways to power up your walk

Change your walking terrain

“Changing up the type of ground you walk on is an awesome way to challenge the ways your muscles and joints work,” says Rosante. “Grass, asphalt, dirt, trails, you name it. Stay safe and see how a different environment changes things up in your body and brain.”

Reverse your walking route

“If you have a walking route you love, stick with it, but go in the opposite direction,” suggests Rosante. “The change in routine will keep things feeling fresh and give you a different perspective on a familiar journey.”

Pick up your walking pace

“Stick with the same route for at least two days,” says Rosante. “Each time you walk, try to cover more ground in less time.”

Add some mindfulness to your walk

“As you walk, focus on the feelings in your body—the way your feet feel as you take each step; the way your muscles feel on every stride,” says Rosante. “You can also pay attention to the feelings Mother Nature is casting as you walk—the sun and wind on your face and hands. ”

Muscle up

“If you’re cleared for exercise and feel like giving yourself an additional boost, throw in some bodyweight strength training along your route,” recommends Rosante. “Add in squats, reverse lunges, and push ups every few minutes.”

Brag a bit

“Share your progress on social media and with your friends and family,” says Rosante. “It’s a great way to inspire other people to get out there and get moving! ”

Amy Schlinger writing for The Healthy.

Another Epidemic–Overdose

Another epidemic plagues the U.S.   55,000  people, die each year due to some form of drug addition.  Here are two reminders that this crises hits not only us regular folks, but also the rich and famous.

Actor Logan Williams, who played a young Barry Allen on CW’s The Flash and also appeared in Hallmark Channel’s When the Heart Calls, died Thursday of an overdose of fentanyl.  He was 16.

a young girl standing in front of a curtain © Liane Hentscher/The CW

Speaking to the New York Post,  Marlyse Williams said her young son had a three-year battle with addiction. She hopes by speaking out on it that she can help stem the rising opioid crisis, where teen mortality rates continue to rise.

 

The opioid crises also claimed the life of another young man, Beckett Cypher, Melissa Etheridge’s son with her former partner Julie Cypher. He was 21.

photo credit: Chris DELMAS , AFP

“Today I joined the hundreds of thousands of families who have lost loved ones to opioid addiction,” the statement from Etheridge said. “My son Beckett, who was just 21, struggled to overcome his addiction and finally succumbed to it today.”

 

This craziness must end.  We have a mental health crises in the U.S. made much worse by the existing pandemic.  Enough of the millions of dollars that are handed out to NPR and the Kennedy Center.  Enough talk of millions going to Planned Parenthood.  We need a comprehensive mental health program starting in our schools.  It will cost many millions for a program of this scope to succeed.  We have the money, but it’s going to organizations with political clout.  Enough already !

 

 

The Best Self-Tanners That Will Turn You Glowy

Slide 1 of 18: It's natural to want to add some warmth to your skin's complexion during the sunnier months, but sun bathers beware: Excessive sun exposure can increase your risk for serious health concerns like melanoma, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. So, for a faux-glow, we opt for a trusty self-tanner to give our skin an Amazonian goddess shimmer.Many of you may feel some type of way about self-tanners, but trust us — the orange, streaky finishes of yesteryear are dead and gone. Check out some of our favorite self-tanners for an endless summer glow.

 

Hate the sun, but love the tan ?  Check out this article by Jennifer Hussein on sunless tanners that will make you glow !

It’s natural to want to add some warmth to your skin’s complexion during the sunnier months, but sun bathers beware: Excessive sun exposure can increase your risk for serious health concerns like melanoma, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. So, for a faux-glow, we opt for a trusty self-tanner to give our skin an Amazonian goddess shimmer.

Many of you may feel some type of way about self-tanners, but trust us — the orange, streaky finishes of yesteryear are dead and gone. Check out some of our favorite self-tanners for an endless summer glow.

There are several more selections to choose from at this link.  Note:  I left the “shop now” links that are in the article in this re-print.  I have no problem letting the author benefit from your purchase as long as it doesn’t affect your price.  It won’t.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/shopping-all/the-best-self-tanners-that-will-turn-you-into-a-glowy-goddess/ss-BB13ZR8p?ocid=spartandhp#image=1