U.K. Garden Idea’s

Planting scheme’s from Jo’s Gardens, an award winning garden design business based near Falmouth in Cornwall.

“Jo’s artistic approach and knowledge of horticulture help her to create beautiful planting schemes that bring her gardens alive.   When the plants are happy in their environment and working in harmony with one another then the garden will flourish and continually evolve through the seasons and years.

From drifts of grasses and perennials to herb gardens, roses and meadows  – please take a look at some of our planting schemes.”

Contemporary plant border, Falmouth

Roses and nepeta smother the top of a Cornish hedge, St. Mawes

Roses and nepeta smother the top of a Cornish hedge, St. Mawes

Gravel Garden, Falmouth

Gravel Garden, Falmouth

Grasses and perennials smother a hot sunny bank

Grasses and perennials smother a hot sunny bank

Lime greens and purples - Ferns and cirsium

Lime greens and purples – Ferns and cirsium

Autumn mix of perennials & grasses

Autumn mix of perennials & grasses

See more planting idea’s at:

http://jogardens.co.uk/home

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Easy And Inexpensive Garden Ideas with Cinder Blocks

There are ideas that are rarely realized by everyone and are actually easy to do, which is by using cinder blocks. Cinder block can be a material to make your garden very beautiful. Cinder block you arrange according to your style, you can color the cinder block or you leave it according to the natural color. Here are pictures full of inspiration.

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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06450
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06440
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06430
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06370
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06380
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06410
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06400
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06340
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06330
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06350
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06310
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06300
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06290
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06280
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06270
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06180
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06140
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06210
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 06200
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Easy And Inexpensive Cinder Block Garden Ideas 0690

Budget sometimes becomes material that you don’t expect if you can use it to beautify your home yard or the terrace of your house.

Great ideas from the article by:

https://home.spartandecor.com/garden-exterior/20-easy-and-inexpensive-ideas-to-create-stunning-garden-with-cinder-block-7309/

 

Drought Tolerant Perennials

10 No Fail Perennials for Low Water Gardens

 

Article by The Garden Glove.com

https://www.thegardenglove.com/10-no-fail-perennials-for-low-water-gardens/

 

No matter where you live, being water wise is the smart way to garden. And if you live in drought stricken or prone areas, it’s a must. While I love a gorgeous hydrangea, and roses are amazing, there are plenty of flowering drought resistant plants that don’t suck down our water resources. These ten no fail drought tolerant perennials for low water gardens fit the bill, are gorgeous as stand alone plants, and come back every year! (Remember, perennials may die back to their roots in a cold winter, but they come back in the spring).

Drought Tolerant Perennials

Here at TGG, we have a high desert garden, so we have either grown most of these drought tolerant perennials ourselves, or have had direct experience with them. So watch for our tips throughout this article to help them look their best, and grow to their potential! These plants can be grown in most areas of the U.S. Here is some inspiration to get you started, the our top plant picks! Photo below shows red Penstemon, Russian Sage and ornamental grasses. By ‘Creative Landscapes‘.

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This photo by ‘BHG‘ shows yellow Yarrow and purple Coneflower in the foreground, with blue Russian Sage in the back.

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Drought Tolerant Plants

Yarrow (Achillea) Zones 3-8

Yarrow has long been one of our fav drought tolerant plants because of its strong architectural feel, long bloom time, low water needs and attractive, feathery foliage. There are many varieties, including ones in pink, red, coral and white, but our favorite is still the bold yellow “Coronation Gold’. Grows to 3 feet, is a great cut and dried flower, and brightens up any garden. Blooms all summer, full sun. Very easy to grow.

Photo by ‘BHG‘.

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Purple Coneflower (Echinacea) Zones 3-8

Purple Coneflower has gone from being a wildflower grown in natural gardens, to one of the most popular perennials around thanks to some amazing new hybrids. Minis from one foot all the way up to four foot tall varieties exist, in every color from purple to white to green, and every sunset color in between. They generally bloom from mid summer through fall, though some start as early as June. Full sun. Butterflies and birds love them! Great cut flower. There are too many varieties to choose a favorite, so we will do our best by first recommending a dwarf variety from ‘Burpee’, “Pow Wow White“. This variety is smaller at 18 inches, can be used in garden bed or containers, and has the most incredible pure white color, perfect for the vase!

 

We also love this large, free flowering variety called “Sombrero Baja Burgundy“. This variety grows to 2 feet, flowers all summer and makes one of the best cut flowers. Extremely heat resistant! This is a butterfly magnet too! You can find other coneflower varieties at ‘Burpee‘ too.

TGG Tip: Cut back old flowers a couple times a week, and you will be rewarded with many more blooms and a neater plant.

 

Russian Sage (Perovskia) Zones 4-9

We love Russian Sage and grow it quite prolifically in our gardens, and it is a tough, beautiful blue plant that should be a backbone of any drought tolerant landscaping. However, take note of the word “prolific”. The species can get quite large, quite fast, and you might find yourself cutting it back more often than you would like. (Which should be done in later fall, to within 1 foot of the ground). However, this dwarf variety “Peek-a Blue” lets you have all the advantages of this plant, with a little less of the only downside. Looks amazing next to Black Eyed Susan or with yellow Yarrow. Full sun, to mostly sunny. Blooms mid summer through fall.

TGG Tip: If you do get your hands on the larger version, and find that it it too big by mid summer, we found that if you cut it back by two thirds, it will quickly rebound and give you another bloom flush by late summer.

Low water perennials-3

 

Ornamental Grass

Ornamental grasses vary a lot, from thirsty sedges to drought tolerant fountain grass. Our pick for today is a fountain grass (Pennisetum) “Hameln”. Well behaved and neatly mounded with fine strappy foliage, this grass grows to 2 feet and sends up stalks of  white plumes in early-mid summer. This drought tolerant perennial grass is an easy grower in full sun, and loves a hot, dry spot. This variety does not reseed. Zones 5-9. What’s not to love!

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Butterfly Bush (Buddleia) Zones 5-9

Ok, a lot of you are going to write us and tell us how this plant is a devil plant, sent to clog the streams and invade the ecosystem. First of all, if any plant is invasive to the point of being a danger to your community, obviously, don’t plant it. But for many areas, especially more arid ones in the west, butterfly bush is an amazing landscape plant that can offer substantial size and bloom in just one season. The butterflies and hummingbirds love it, and it’s GORG in bloom. And it is an important source of nectar. Check out this rant on the controversy from, well, ‘Garden Rant‘! So step one, check with your local nursery to find out if its a pest in your area. Then, make sure you plant a cultivar, not the species. You can even cut back the flowers before they go to seed to prevent spreading. Our choice? We love “Miss Molly” for its almost red blooms.

TGG Tip: These grow to 6 feet, but in late winter, they need to be cut back to 1-2 feet from the ground, Trust me, by June, you will never know, and it will repay you with a healthier plant with better blooms.

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Coreopsis (Verticillata) Zones 3-9

Coreopsis is a happy and sunny daisy like flower for the garden, fine with hot, dry spots and blooming from spring through fall. Though several cultivars exist, including a pink one, we love “Early Sunrise” for it’s bright yellow, double blooms. Full sun to part sun, 18 inches tall. Deer resistant too! This one has a special place in my heart! It was the very first perennial I ever grew, and the amount of flowers you get is amazing.

TGG Tip: Instead of having to deadhead the old blooms one at a time, coreopsis will take a shearing back of one third of the plant with garden shears, then will quickly rebloom.

 

 

Beardtongue (Penstemon) Zones 5-9

Penstemon is a native wildflower, available in many cultivars in red, blues and pinks. A tubular flower over semi evergreen foliage makes this a winner in the drouth resistant garden, and has won its share of coveted awards as well. Full to part sun, it likes well drained soil, and blooms all summer long. 18 inches to 2 1/2 feet high depending on variety, you will find hummingbirds can’t resist this beauty! Our favorite is “Carillo Red“. We’re guessing you didn’t realize there were so many gorgeous perennials for low water landscaping, right?

 

 

Stonecrop (Sedum) Zones 4-9

Sedum is a drought tolerant perennial with fleshy leaves that tolerates low water landscaping well, and their flowers are star shaped beauties that cover the plants late summer through fall. There are two basic types, creeping sedums that make amazing ground covers, and upright sedums that are perfect garden plants to bring some freshness to the late summer garden. Upright varieties can remain well into early winter for four season interest, and the birds love them! Full sun to part sun. Our favorite creeping variety is “Angelina”, which is a fresh green to yellow green, and has pretty yellowish flowers mid summer. Four inches high, this stuff spreads, but in a good way. Easy to pull out if is plants itself in unwanted areas, this delicate looking but tough as nails plant quickly makes a garden look established or covers bare ground. Our upright choice is the old favorite “Autumn Joy”with a flat pink flowerhead, it grows to 2 feet. The flowers slowly turn to rust as the season progresses, and this looks amazing with ornamental grasses in the fall.

“Angelina”

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“Autumn Joy”

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Wormwood (Artemisia) Zones 4-9

Wormwood is one of those near perfect drought resistant plants, though its grown mainly for its foliage. Its  tolerant of low water, poor soil and high humidity. Wormwood’s ferny, grayish green leaves are the perfect backdrop for any flowering plant. Once established, needs very little additional water, and very pest resistant. Full sun to part shade, we love “Powis Castle” that grows into a mound to 3 feet high and wide. Aromatic.

TGG Tip: Flower stalks are insignificant, cut off any that appear. Photo from ‘Knibb Design‘.

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Wand Flower (Gaura) Zones 5-9

Gaura is one of our new favorite drought tolerant perennials, being used in our high desert area in high end gardens as elegant yet modern pops of color. Wand flower is aptly named, as these butterfly shaped flowers are held up to 3 feet high on long wand like stems all summer. Needs good winter drainage. Puts down a tap root, so make sure you are happy with their placement before they get established. “Whirling Butterflies” is a mostly white variety with a touch of red on the sepal, but we love “Siskiyou Pink” and “RosyJane” as well! Full sun to mostly sunny, the hummingbirds and butterflies love these drought resistant plants!

“Whirling Butterflies”

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RosyJane

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Can’t find a way to make a garden gorgeous with these drought tolerant perennials for low water gardens? Then we can’t help you! Do you have a favorite low water garden plant you want to share? Comment! And then check out our posts on How to Grow Lavender Like the French or How to Grow a Wildflower Garden.

Image Credits: Bluestone, Creative Landscapes, BHG, BHG, Bluestone, Wayside, White Flower Farm, Knibb Design, Bluestone

Expert Drainage Tips That Will Save You Money in the Long Run

‘Dr. Drainage’ Ryan Larsen shared the insider scoop on landscaping drainage problems (and how to avoid them!).

By Jenny Krane  Better Homes & Gardens

You make sure that all your indoor drains are clear, clean, and working properly. So why wouldn’t you give the same amount of thought to outdoor drainage? It’s easy to forget that your yard doesn’t take care of rainwater and snowmelt on its own. With a little pre-planning, you can avoid thousands of dollars worth of water damage to your foundation, siding, and landscaping.

gutters

We talked to Ryan Larsen, a civil engineer at NDS, Inc. NDS manufactures drainage products that can be used in residential or commercial settings. Nicknamed ‘Dr. Drainage,’ Ryan is also the host of NDS’s instructional YouTube videos on drainage and stormwater management. He’s been with NDS since 2012 and worked as a land development civil engineer for 10 years before. Through his experience, Ryan has picked up a few valuable tips and tricks when it comes to drainage.

Ryan was instrumental in developing NDS’s Home Drainage Center, an interactive online tool that will help you identify your drainage problems, the cause, and the best solution for your situation. The team that created this tool found the eight most common drainage problems. Ryan stands by the phrase, “Prepare for April showers to enjoy your May flowers.” By planning ahead and identifying drainage issues early, you’ll have fewer issues with water in and around your home.

Signs of Poor Drainage

If you take the time to look, it’s easy to determine whether or not you have areas of poor drainage. Low spots in your yard can collect water from rain and sprinklers, which will drown the grass and other plants growing in those areas. In some places, you can actually see standing water. Other signs to look for include a chronically wet home exterior and water staining.

Poor Drainage Problems

Of the eight most common drainage problems, the most common is from downspout runoff. Having all the water from your roof filter into one, focused spot next to your home is going to cause sitting water—where it can seep into your home’s foundation, no less. The worst-case scenario of poor drainage is that your foundation cracks. This can cause uneven home settling, mold and mildew, and flooding in the basement. Fixing a cracked foundation can cost you tens of thousands of dollars, depending on how extensive the damage is.

dry creek landscaping rocks sculpture home

The Ideal Drainage System

The number one rule that Ryan advises every homeowner should stick by is the 10-foot rule: with any drainage system, redirect water at least 10 feet away from your house. A few feet aren’t enough, especially when the snow melts quickly or if there is a big rain storm. Ryan also recommends angling drainage pipes downward and away from the home.

Related: This Garden Does Drainage Right

When it comes to drainage systems, Ryan finds that passive or gravity-driven systems are best. “Your pump is going to fail eventually, and I can almost guarantee that it is going to fail during the storm, not when it’s bright and sunny out,” Ryan says. One simple task you can do to help a system work to its full potential is to fill in low spots in the yard and around the home. So instead of collecting in divots in the grass, a majority of the runoff will be taken care of by the drainage system.

One of the best things about drainage solutions is that homeowners can do a lot of the work on their own—you just need to be willing to do a little digging. If you’re installing a large system in your yard, rent a larger tool for efficiency and ease. “Anything that involves a concrete saw I would leave up to a contractor,” Ryan says. Whether you’re needing to get under a walkway or into the foundation, it’s best to leave the heavy-duty structural jobs to the professionals.

Making sure your property is outfitted for efficient water drainage should be a priority for homeowners. You will save money, improve your landscape’s chance of success, and prevent irreparable damage to the structure of your home. Taking the time to identify and solve issues will make it so you don’t need to give Dr. Drainage a call.

Top 12 Garden Seed Catalogs – 2020

The Garden Glove

One of the hardest decisions a gardener must make is where to buy their garden seeds, plants and supplies. Especially when so much is now available online. Here at The Garden Glove, we have several favorite garden seed catalogs and suppliers, and we update this list every January. This list has been updated for 2020. Here is some info on our top picks that we use ourselves, and our experience with them, along with their website information. Log onto their websites and request their catalogs today to have seeds in time for spring planting! Or order online like I do… And check out our favorite choices for buying live plants online at the end! And now on to our list of the best 2020 garden seed catalogs!

Top 12 Garden Seed Catalogs

 

Just in time fellow gardeners, a seed catalog party.  Grab a cup and relax as Garden Glove relates their experiences at 12 of the best seed company’s in America.  Here is a link for you to begin reading:

https://www.thegardenglove.com/top-garden-seed-catalogs/

Small Yard & Small Garden Landscaping Ideas

brick path along landscaping to home deck

Photo by Kritsada Panichgul

Just because you have a smaller plot doesn’t mean you can’t stand out. Maximize the impact of minimal yards with these small garden, small yard, and small backyard landscaping ideas.

For all 16 ideas from BH&G, click below:

https://www.bhg.com/gardening/landscaping-projects/landscape-basics/simple-solutions-for-small-space-landscapes/?utm_source=pinterest.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=bhg_bhg_979668&utm_content=textoverlay_toppinterest&utm_term=handygardenplans_202001

January Regional Garden To-Do Lists

Article Image

Make sure you’re starting the new year on the right foot with the help of our regional experts. They’ve compiled detailed lists of exactly what you should be doing in your garden in January. Wondering if those frost-damaged leaves should be removed? Trying to figure out the perfect time to prune, plant, or purchase? We have all the answers.

Gardeners in southern states can enjoy working their gardens in cooler temperatures, while northern gardeners can prep, plan, and dream of greener days ahead. No matter where you dwell, there are gardening activities worth your time during this chilly month. Find the garden to-do list for your region below.

From the Mid-Atlantic to the desert Southwest, here is the guide for your particular area.

https://www.finegardening.com/collection/january-regional-garden-to-do-lists

47 Beautiful Flower Bed Design Ideas for Your Front Yard

Here are 47 ideas for your front yard. Some simple changes, some that will take much planning and preparation.  So grab your favorite cup and dig in to these ideas.

Article by Albert Geonino.

Plenty of flower gardens that you are able to apply on your front page. All that you’re able to enjoy when you’ve applied a flower garden on your house page. Building a flower garden on your front yard isn’t as hard as you may think! Now you have some fantastic tips for your new Flower Bed Design. Roses are more difficult to maintain from different flowers like tulips since they grow back year after year. Edible garden will bring extra beauty to your property and lawn. Looking at styles will provide you with some wonderful ideas and can assist you to become quite creative with the form of garden that you want to create. Another idea is to specify a focus for your landscape. Themes are successful only in the event you unify all of the garden aspects carefully.

Most people consider flowers for color. In selecting the forms of flowers you will grow in your garden, spend some time researching the best kinds of flowers for your region. Perhaps you enjoy the concept of just smaller flowers or you wish to decide on ground cover as it’s much less difficult to maintain. In reality, you can construct a lovely topsy-turvy towering flower bed with only a few terra cotta pots and some other supplies. The accession of herbs to a patio planter adds a fantastic aroma as guests take pleasure in the patio during the summertime. Flowering shrubs and perennials will make extra textures and colours. With good nutrition and maintenance you are going to have a lovely flower bed that doesn’t ask you to devote hours weeding it. Trees like coconut, palm along with green grass lawns are going to be a proper combination. There are a number of forms of flower bed edging you must look at.

How to Set Realistic Garden Goals

A basket of multi-colored carrots.

 

I know, it’s not even the middle of January and already I’m thinking gardening.  I can’t help it.  Can’t do anything about it yet, except plan.  I ran across this article that might interest you gardeners or wanna-be gardeners.  It’s all about planning and setting garden goals.  As I see it, now is the perfect time to do just that.

The article is meaty,  so I won’t post it all.  Just click below and enjoy it.

https://homespunseasonalliving.com/how-to-set-realistic-garden-goals/