50 SUPER EASY DRY CREEK LANDSCAPING IDEAS

BY CANDACE OSMOND for The Backyard Boss

As an avid do-it-myselfer, I tend to look at things and and immediately think, “I can do that.” Not everyone works that way and prefers to hire a professional to complete tasks around their house like gardening or constructing a display based on some dry creek bed ideas. But if you’re anything like me, you can take a picture on Pinterest and not only copy it but make it better.

Sometimes all we need is a little inspiration and this list of dry creek bed landscaping images is sure to succeed. Have a look-see and start planning your dry river bed landscaping ideas for this weekend.

BACKYARD HAVEN

For the go-getter in all of us, this dry creek bed landscaping idea covers the whole darn yard. Everything from rock beds, mulch mounds, gravel pits, and even a cute bridge to join two areas, this idea is certainly a big project but definitely doable.

A LUSH BED OF ROCKS AND PLANTS

Baxters garden
Source: Gardening for You

This dry creek bed design is a lot of lusciousness in a small area and shows how, with a bit of creativity, you can turn a narrow outdoor space into an oasis. A simple rock path lined with larger stones and thick greenery lead the way to a quaint seating area where you can enjoy your hard work with a drink in hand.

A SIMPLE STACK

Dry Waterfall

It really doesn’t get any easy than this. Gather up a collection of large, jagged stones and place them stacked underneath or in front of one of the eaves trough drains around your house. It’ll filter the water coming down and help guide it away from your house with style.

A MORE NATURAL BED

This landscaping idea is best pulled off in a larger area. If you have a big, empty backyard or some land you can use, then by all means, have at it. By using plants that are commonly found in nature rather than from a nursery, you can achieve this nature-inspired dry creek bed. Take it one step further and use plants that are native to your environment.

Make it yourself!

SLANTED DRY RIVER BED

By designing and forming your dry river bed on a slant such as this, you make the gorgeous feature visible from just about anywhere in the outdoor area. And if you’re going to put in the hard work of creating a beauty like this one you may as well show it off.

Click below to see more ideas:

50 Super Easy Dry Creek Landscaping Ideas (backyardboss.net)

Fast Growing Privacy Trees

If you’re looking for quick privacy and shade, check out this list of fast growing privacy trees. These trees will grow quickly and won’t take decades to provide shelter as well as keep the neighbors from spying on you. So what do you plant that’ll grow quickly to give you some privacy as well as shade?

There are so many types of beautiful trees that can make your landscaping amazing. But if you are particularly looking for shade or privacy, what you want are fast growing privacy trees. Some of these include varieties such as River Birch, Green Giant Arborvitae, and even Weeping Willows. Check out the whole list below.

Not all of these are evergreen, but you will get privacy in the spring/summer and even into fall when people tend to be outside more.

River Birch

Privacy Trees - River Birch

I am still in awe of how fast these grow.  River birches are beautiful trees and they have the most interesting bark that looks like it’s shedding or peeling.  We planted three river birch trees in the side of our yard and they were tiny. 

River Birch Facts

  • Deciduous (loses the leaves in the fall)
  • Can grow 40-70 feet tall
  • Beautiful peeling bark
  • Loves moist soil areas
  • Grows 1.5-3 feet per year
  • Zones 4-9

Green Giant Arborvitae

Fast Growing Privacy Trees - Green Giant Arborvitae

Another stunner and this one is evergreen – meaning you’ll have the beautiful green color year-round.  This one can grow up to 3 feet per year. 

We planted three of these that were around 2 feet tall and in 3 years they are about 12-15 feet tall.  Give them room when you plant – it can spread out between 12 and 20 feet.  They have a beautiful cone shape – like a pretty Christmas tree.

Green Giant Facts

  • Evergreen (stays green year-round)
  • Can grow 3 feet per year
  • Zones 3 through 7 or 8
  • Grows 30-40 feet
  • Drought tolerant

Weeping Willow Tree

Weeping Willow

One of my most favorite trees, the weeping willow tree is stunning.  It’s drooping “weeping” limbs/leaves are gorgeous.  Make sure you have plenty of room and beware you won’t get much grass growing under or around the willow. 

Keep it away from your septic lines, because the roots can potentially damage your lines.   It can get between 30-40 feet tall and wide. 

hey aren’t evergreen, however,  they are one of the first to get their leaves in the spring and one of the last to lose them in the fall/winter.

Also – weeping willows are not ideal if planted next to sidewalks. It’s far too droopy and will block the path without constant trimming.

Weeping Willow Facts

  • Deciduous
  • Invasive shallow roots so don’t plant next to sidewalks or septic lines
  • Can grow 30-40 feet tall and wide so give them plenty of room
  • Grows up to 2 feet or more per year
  • Zones 6-8

Tulip Tree

Fast growing privacy trees - tulip poplar

This is another one that’s growing faster than I imagined.  Tulip trees, also known as tulip poplars, can grow between 70-100 feet tall.  They have a beautiful cone shape with dark green leaves and turn a beautiful golden-yellow color in the fall before they lose their leaves. 

It’s not evergreen, but definitely worth planting if you’re looking for some fast shade.  Give it plenty of room because it’s one of the fastest-growing and largest trees in North America.

Tulip Poplar Facts

  • Mature height of 70-100 feet
  • Is actually a member of the Magnolia family of trees
  • Zones 4-9
  • Deciduous

Red Maple

red maple

Red Maples are stunning trees with fiery red leaves in the spring.  They can grow up to 3 feet per year, so not quite as fast growing as some of the other trees on the list, but still impressive. 

And what a visual show these are!  Give them plenty of room to grow and they can live for over 50 years.  

Red Maple Facts

  • Zones 3-10
  • Can grow up to 3 feet per year
  • Averages 40-50 feet tall
  • Deciduous
  • Can tolerate moist or dry soils
  • Don’t plant next to sidewalks or driveways due to a shallow root system

Source: Fast Growing Privacy Trees (createandfind.com)

5 Awesomely Easy Landscaping Projects

Stone and gravel front walkway to home
Image: Megan West, Interior Stylist
No need for fancy DIY skills, a lot of money, or a ton of time to pull off 

It’s your yard — yours to do with as you wish. And while that’s great, that doesn’t mean you have to be one of those people who spend every spare moment in their yard, sprucing it up. 

But, still, your landscaping could use a little something. But something easy. 

Here are five totally doable projects that your budget will barely notice, but your neighbors definitely will:

#1 Add Some (Tough) Edging

Rigid flowerbed edging
Image: Paul Gerritsen/Shutterstock

Tell your grass who’s boss with edging that can stand up to even the crabbiest of all crabgrasses. 

But don’t make the mistake that many homeowners make of buying the flexible plastic stuff, thinking it will be easier to install. It’ll look cheap and amateurish from day one.

Worse, it won’t last. And before you know it, you won’t be able to tell where your garden bed ends and your “lawn” begins.

Instead buy the more rigid, tough stuff in either fiberglass, aluminum, or steel.

Tips on installing edging:

  • Lay out a hose in the pattern you want.
  • Sprinkle flour or powdered chalk to mark the hose pattern.
  • Use a lawn edger (or spade) to make an incision for the edging.
  • Tap the edging into the incision with a rubber mallet.

The cost? Mostly your time, and up to $2.50 a square foot for the edging.

#2 Create a Focal Point with a Berm

Berm built in front yard
Image: Jon Jenks-Bauer

A berm is a mound of gently sloping earth, often created to help with drainage. You can also build them to create “island beds,” a focal point of textures and colors that are so much more interesting than plain ol’ green grass. 

Plus, they’ll give you privacy — and diffuse street noises. What’s not to like about that? Especially if you live in a more urban area.

For most yards, berms should max out at 2-feet high because of the space needed to properly build one.

They need a ratio of 4-6 feet of width for every foot of height. That’s at least 8 feet for a typical 2-foot-high berm. So be sure you have the room, or decrease the height of your berm.

Popular berm plantings include:

  • Flowering bushes, such as azaleas
  • Evergreens, such as blue spruce 
  • Perennials such as periwinkle
  • Tall, swaying prairie grasses
  • Lots of mulch to keep weeds away

Save on Soil

Soil costs a whole lot less in bulk — $20 / cubic yard vs. almost $70 for the same amount in bags from a big-box store. Even with a delivery fee, you’ll come out ahead.

The cost? Usually less than $300, depending on how big you make it, how much soil you need to buy to get to your desired height, and which plants you choose.

#3 Make a Flagstone Wall

Aim to build a wall no more than 12 inches tall, and it becomes a super simple DIY project — no mortar needed at all! 

Rock wall around raised flower bed
Image: Stranded in Cleveland

How to build an easy flagstone wall:

  • Dig a trench a couple of inches deep and wide enough to accommodate the flagstones.
  • Fill with pea gravel and/or sand and tamp to make level.
  • Lay out the flagstones to see their shapes and sizes.
  • Stack the smaller stones first.
  • Save the largest, prettiest flagstones for the top layer.
  • Backfill with gravel.

Choose a stone of consistent thickness. Flagstone might be limestone, sandstone, shale — any rock that splits into slabs. 

The cost? About $300 for stones and sand (a ton of 2-inch-thick stone is enough for a wall 10 feet long and 12 inches high).

#4 Install a Path with Flagstone or Gravel

There’s something romantic, charming, and simply welcoming about a meandering pathway to your front door or back garden — which means it has super-huge impact when it comes to your home’s curb appeal. 

You can use flagstone, pea gravel, decomposed or crushed granite, even poured concrete (although that’s not easy to DIY). 

A few tips for building a pathway:

  • Allow 3 feet of width for clearance.
  • Create curves rather than straight lines for a pleasing effect.
  • Remove sod at least 3 to 4 inches deep to keep grass from coming back.
  • If you live in an area with heavy rains, opt for large, heavy stones.

The cost? Anywhere from a couple of hundred bucks to upwards of $500 depending on the material you use, with decomposed granite being the least expensive, and flagstone (also the easiest of the bunch to install) the costliest. 

#5 Build a Tree Surround

Stone tree surround
Image: Clean Green Landscape

Installing a masonry surround for a tree is a twofer project: It looks great, and it means you’ve got less to mow. Come to think of it, it’s a threefer. It can work as extra seating when you have your lawn party, too! 

All it takes is digging a circular trench, adding some sand, and installing brick, cement blocks, or stone. Just go for whatever look you like best. 

The trickiest part is getting an even circle around the tree. Here’s how: 

  1. Tie a rope around the tree, making a loop big enough so that when you pull it taut against the tree, the outer edge of the loop is right where you want the surround to be. 
  2. Set your spade inside the loop with the handle plumb — straight up and down. Now, as you move around the tree, the loop of rope keeps the spade exactly the same distance from the base of the tree, creating a nice circle.

Then build the tree surround:

  • Dig out a circular trench about 8 inches deep and 6 inches wide. 
  • Add a layer of sand. 
  • Set bricks at an angle for a saw-tooth effect or lay them end-to-end.
  • Fill the surround with 2 to 3 inches of mulch.

The cost? Super cheap. You can do it for less than $25 with commonly available pavers and stones. 

Source: Easy Landscaping | Easy Maintenance Landscaping | Yard Tips (houselogic.com)

How to Pet-Proof Your Garden This Spring

By A.A. Newton for Lifehacker

Pets and gardens don’t always get along. If you have both, it’s important to keep them out of each other’s business so everyone stays happy and healthy.a dog sitting in the grass: A boxer dog lies next to a garden bed full of green plants and yellow flowers. It has its tongue out. © Photo: kochabamba (Shutterstock) A boxer dog lies next to a garden bed full of green plants and yellow flowers. It has its tongue out.

How to pet-proof your garden

Of course, this is a lot easier said than done. Dogs love to dig, and cats love to find new and exciting venues for pooping—which, for some reason, are always your garden beds. But with some common sense and a little work, you can keep pets and other assorted critters out of your garden and out of trouble. This video from HomeAdvisor lays out loads of great tips for pet-proofing any garden:

Grab some chicken wire

You probably already know that chicken wire is great for keeping cats, dogs, and other small animals out of garden beds—and that you should stick to pet-safe fertilizer and plants in case they outsmart the chicken wire—but plants aren’t the only part of your garden that’s potentially dangerous for pets. Birds can spread diseases like salmonella to you and your pets, so if you have a bird feeder, it’s important to clean it regularly and keep it far away from your pets (and kids).

Add a few decoys

Trying to keep animals from getting into trouble requires near-constant supervision, which is where decoys come in handy. We already know that giving pets a “yes” for every “no” is an effective way to modify their behavior; designating a corner of your yard for unlimited digging (or an all-you-can-eat catnip buffet) should make your plants look a lot less interesting by comparison.

In general, you can avoid a lot of headaches by giving pets an inviting space of their own that’s near the garden without being in the garden. That could be a doghouse, a patch of dirt with lots of toys, a personal grove of catnip and wheat grass, or even some pet-friendly outdoor furniture. You’ll still probably need some chicken wire, but with any luck, your pets will be so busy enjoying their personal hangout zone that they won’t even look at your tomatoes.

Source: How to Pet-Proof Your Garden This Spring (msn.com)

These Are the Warm Weather Plants That Will Thrive In the Hot Months Ahead

Slide 1 of 18: As the temperatures begin to rise, it’s time to put warm-weather vegetables, herbs, and plants in the ground (or containers) so they grow for the season ahead! For crops that mature quickly, like beans, planting seeds will work just fine. But for other plants, like tomatoes, you’ll need to purchase transplants or fruit won’t have time to mature in some regions of the country. All annual flowers can also be planted in June, like perennials, which come back every year around this time, too. The biggest challenge in June is making sure to keep plants watered evenly. It’s also smart to keep an eye out for pests. Inspect your plants every few days so insects won’t get a foothold; you’ll be surprised how quickly they appear out of nowhere! Contact your university coop extension service (find yours here) for identification and control measures if you do spot unwelcome visitors.Typically, here’s what you can plant in June:

 © Karl Tapales – Getty Images

As the temperatures begin to rise, it’s time to put warm-weather vegetables, herbs, and plants in the ground (or containers) so they grow for the season ahead! For crops that mature quickly, like beans, planting seeds will work just fine. But for other plants, like tomatoes, you’ll need to purchase transplants or fruit won’t have time to mature in some regions of the country. All annual flowers can also be planted in June, like perennials, which come back every year around this time, too. The biggest challenge in June is making sure to keep plants watered evenly. It’s also smart to keep an eye out for pests. Inspect your plants every few days so insects won’t get a foothold; you’ll be surprised how quickly they appear out of nowhere! Contact your university coop extension service (find yours here) for identification and control measures if you do spot unwelcome visitors.

Typically, here’s what you can plant in June:

1) Lavender

2) Okra

3) Basil

4) Fanflower

5) Eggplants

6) Succulents

7) Peppers

8) Cucumbers

9) Angelonia

10) Swiss Chard

11) Summer Squash

12) Caladiums

13) Winter Squash

14) Beans

15) Begonias

16) Melons

17) Sunflowers

My favorite, tomato, can be planted in mid to late May. Check last date of frost in your area.

Article by Arricca Elin Sansone for House Beautiful

Source: These Are the Warm Weather Plants That Will Thrive In the Hot Months Ahead (msn.com)

Shade Perennials for Weed Suppression

These quick-spreading ground covers are perfect for reducing understory maintenance

‘Burgundy Glow’ ajuga grows streaks of variegated white among purple and green dappled foliage. Photo: Michelle Gervais

Pulling weeds usually isn’t at the top of the list of anyone’s favorite things to do, so why not utilize nature to prevent those weeds from growing in the first place? Try planting one of these weed-suppressing, colony-forming, shade-loving perennials.

Pink lily-of-the-valley

Convallaria majalis var. rosea syn. Convallaria majalis ‘Rosea’, Zones 3–8

Lily-of-the-valley (Convallaria majalis, Zones 3–8) is an old-fashioned plant that spreads somewhat aggressively in partial to full shade, creating a dense colony to a height of 6 to 12 inches. Fragrant bell-shaped flowers in spring are usually white; however, there is a pink lily-of-the-valley. There are also a few varieties with very soft pink flowers, but unless they are examined right next to the white flowers, any difference is too hard to notice. ‘Flore Pleno’ is a double-flowered variety worth seeking out, as is ‘Prolificans’, in which each flower is replaced by a cluster of three to seven flowers, giving even more flowering power and fragrance.

Brighten up the understory of your trees with the yellow flowers and streaked foliage of ‘Herman’s Pride’ yellow archangel. 
Photo: Bill Johnson

Yellow archangel

Lamium galeobdolon, Zones 4–9

A species to consider in dry shade is yellow archangel (Lamium galeobdolon, Zones 4–9). Growing 1 to 2 feet in height and width, yellow archangel features medium green leaves with silvery markings along the margins and beautiful, tubular yellow flowers. The plant spreads quickly and somewhat aggressively, requiring some thought into placement in the garden to avoid having to weed it out later. However, there is a clump-forming and nonspreading cultivar called ‘Herman’s Pride’ that only grows 10 to 14 inches tall and wide and has similar yellow, tubular flowers to the species but with more noticeable silver marking to the leaves.

Ajuga is a wonderful shade plant

Ajuga

Ajuga reptans, Zones 3–10

Reaching only a few inches high, ajuga is a wonderful plant for weed suppression in shade. As it steadily spreads, the flat leaves and vigorous stems form an intertwined and dense net that prevents weed seeds from even getting started. The main feature is the foliage, which can come in a wide array of colors: green, white, cream, pink, bronze, and shades of purple. As a bonus, blue spikes of flowers cover the plants in late spring, and these blooms are popular with pollinators. If you grow one of the variegated varieties such as ‘Burgundy Glow’, promptly remove any nonvariegated sections, as they will quickly dominate. My favorite cultivar is ‘Bronze Beauty’, which sports deep blue flower spikes and attractive, contrasting, bronze-tinged green foliage.

It might take a little work to get shade perennial plantings established, but it will save you time in the long run that you won’t spend weeding. For more ideas on how to suppress weeds in shade, read about these 10 ground covers for shade.

Article By Chris Schlenker for Fine Gardening

—Chris Schlenker is the head gardener of McCrory Gardens at South Dakota State University in Brookings, South Dakota.

Source: Shade Plants that Suppress Weeds – FineGardening

HERBS THAT GROW TOGETHER IN A POT

herbs in pot

When it comes to having a herb garden, there’s really nothing more satisfying than picking your very own fresh herbs for that night’s dish! These herbs that grow together can be planted in just one pot or directly in your herb garden outdoors for a full, healthy harvest in no time! These herbs not only enjoy each other’s company, but also feed off of each other by exchanging important nutrients and therefore, making sure your harvest is plentiful! Herbs that grow together stay together!

A rule of thumb when planting any herb or vegetable together, is to make sure they have everything in common including irrigation, sun needs, and soil. Another thing to consider is the herb’s height – for example, fennel grows quite tall and would like ridiculous planted alongside smaller herbs such as mint.

Herbs such as rosemary, thyme, and sage like a fairly dry soil, while basil and parsley like a little more moisture. One herb that you absolutely must always plant by itself is mint. Mint does not go well will other herbs as it will take over the entire pot and could also cross pollinate with other varieties of mint plants, such as spearmint. Herbs that like the same type of environment, will usually grow very well together! Take for example these Mediterranean herbs that can be all planted together in one pot.

MEDITERRANEAN HERBS:

OTHER HERBS THAT CAN BE PLANTED TOGETHER

So now that you know about these herbs that grow together, it’s time to get to planting!  

Posted by Aniela M.

Source: Herbs That Grow Together In a Pot – Plant Instructions

Easy And Inexpensive Garden Ideas with Cinder Blocks

A repeat post from last year. One of the most viewed.

There are ideas that are rarely realized by everyone and are actually easy to do, which is by using cinder blocks. Cinder block can be a material to make your garden very beautiful. Cinder block you arrange according to your style, you can color the cinder block or you leave it according to the natural color. Here are pictures full of inspiration.

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Budget sometimes becomes material that you don’t expect if you can use it to beautify your home yard or the terrace of your house.

Great ideas from the article by:

https://home.spartandecor.com/garden-exterior/20-easy-and-inexpensive-ideas-to-create-stunning-garden-with-cinder-block-7309/

 

Landscaping Mistakes That Make Home Buyers Walk the Other Way

Slide 1 of 12: If you’re selling your home or planning to sell, you know you need to make sure everything is in order. Your paint may need touch-ups, carpets should be cleaned, and all those knick-knacks need to be put away. But what about your landscaping? Since first impressions can make or break a sale, steer clear of these 11 landscaping mistakes that can make home buyers walk—or even run—the other way. Related: Landscaping: A Good Investment

 © istockphoto.com

Your Landscaping Can Help Sell Your Home

If you’re selling your home or planning to sell, you know you need to make sure everything is in order. Your paint may need touch-ups, carpets should be cleaned, and all those knick-knacks need to be put away. But what about your landscaping? Since first impressions can make or break a sale, steer clear of these landscaping mistakes that can make home buyers walk—or even run—the other way.

Slide 2 of 12: Sure, man-made ponds and water features can help create a relaxing outdoor space, but they can also attract insects, such as mosquitoes. Plus, it takes work to keep them clean and well-maintained—work potential buyers might not be up for. Morgan Knull, a broker with Re/Max Gateway, told the Washington Post that buyers are often intimidated when it comes to a water feature’s maintenance, such as dealing with clogged filters and leaky liners.

 © istockphoto.com

Large Water Features

Sure, man-made ponds and water features can help create a relaxing outdoor space, but they can also attract insects, such as mosquitoes. Plus, it takes work to keep them clean and well-maintained—work potential buyers might not be up for. Morgan Knull, a broker with Re/Max Gateway, told the Washington Post that buyers are often intimidated when it comes to a water feature’s maintenance, such as dealing with clogged filters and leaky liners.

Slide 4 of 12: While the right tree may offer shade or some textural contrast in your landscaping, big trees too close to the house can be a red flag. Depending on the size and age of the tree, large trees may cause buyers to worry about damage due to falling limbs. Plus, tree removal can be pricey with extreme projects costing as much as $2,000, according to HomeAdvisor.

 © istockphoto.com

Large Trees

While the right tree may offer shade or some textural contrast in your landscaping, big trees too close to the house can be a red flag. Depending on the size and age of the tree, large trees may cause buyers to worry about damage due to falling limbs. Plus, tree removal can be pricey with extreme projects costing as much as $2,000, according to HomeAdvisor.

Slide 5 of 12: A healthy lawn can be a plus when selling your home, but there can be too much of a good thing. For some potential homeowners, a huge lawn may be overwhelming. Since not all home buyers enjoy doing yard work, big, open lawns may mean an investment in time and energy they just don’t have to offer. If you have a big open lawn, there are some things you can do: Consider installing a large patio, or creating some smaller native plant gardens to break it up, or setting up multiple outdoor living areas, depending on your space.

© istockphoto.com

A Huge Lawn

A healthy lawn can be a plus when selling your home, but there can be too much of a good thing. For some potential homeowners, a huge lawn may be overwhelming. Since not all home buyers enjoy doing yard work, big, open lawns may mean an investment in time and energy they just don’t have to offer. If you have a big open lawn, there are some things you can do: Consider installing a large patio, or creating some smaller native plant gardens to break it up, or setting up multiple outdoor living areas, depending on your space.

Slide 10 of 12: Cracks in your home’s concrete patio or walkways aren’t just unsightly, they can be dangerous. They can also be costly to fix, with HomeAdvisor estimating the cost of filling smaller holes or cracks at $100, if you do it yourself. Large repairs can set you back up to $20 per square foot.

 © istockphoto.com

Cracked Concrete

Cracks in your home’s concrete patio or walkways aren’t just unsightly, they can be dangerous. They can also be costly to fix, with HomeAdvisor estimating the cost of filling smaller holes or cracks at $100, if you do it yourself. Large repairs can set you back up to $20 per square foot.

Slide 12 of 12: For those thinking of selling their home, a messy or unkempt yard may give potential buyers a bad first impression. For sellers, be sure to mow regularly, weed flower beds, keep the yard clutter-free, and put away toys when not in use.

 © istockphoto.com

A Messy Yard

For those thinking of selling their home, a messy or unkempt yard may give potential buyers a bad first impression. For sellers, be sure to mow regularly, weed flower beds, keep the yard clutter-free, and put away toys when not in use.

Article by Rachel Brougham for bobvila.com

Source: 11 Landscaping Mistakes That Make Home Buyers Walk the Other Way (msn.com)

Grandma’s genius gardening secrets Pt 1

Slide 1 of 28: Whether you're a green-thumbed grower or stricken with black thumb, we can all use a little helping hand in the yard from time to time, and these age-old tips have been tried and tested across the decades. Handed down from our grandparents' generation, we've rounded up the best hacks for planting, pruning and pest control to help you create a beautiful, blooming outside space. Click or scroll for more...

Whether you’re a green-thumbed grower or stricken with black thumb, we can all use a little helping hand in the yard from time to time, and these age-old tips have been tried and tested across the decades. Handed down from our grandparents’ generation, we’ve rounded up the best hacks for planting, pruning and pest control to help you create a beautiful, blooming outside space.

Slide 2 of 28: To help space out produce throughout the year, the generations before us would sow seeds in intervals. Also known as succession planting, this is a simple method that’s been around for centuries. Sow seeds roughly 14 days apart to maximize garden space, optimize quality and guarantee yourself a constant stream of harvestable goods. Plus, everything won't be ready all at once, so they’ll be no need to freeze mountains of berries or give away bucket-loads of carrots!

 © JohnatAPW / Shutterstock

Plant vegetables in intervals

To help space out produce throughout the year, the generations before us would sow seeds in intervals. Also known as succession planting, this is a simple method that’s been around for centuries. Sow seeds roughly 14 days apart to maximize garden space, optimize quality and guarantee yourself a constant stream of harvestable goods. Plus, everything won’t be ready all at once, so they’ll be no need to freeze mountains of berries or give away bucket-loads of carrots!

Slide 3 of 28: If you remember your grandma laying straw beneath her berries, it was for a very practical reason. Delicate fruits can easily be damaged by soil and flooding, but by adding straw to the top layer of soil, you can stop them from dangling on the ground. Barley straw is ideal for this since it's soft and easy to work with. This mulch layer will also protect certain plants from frostbite in cold weather and will hinder any bugs that attempt to climb onto the fruit. What a nifty gardening hack!

Lay straw to protect delicate fruit

If you remember your grandma laying straw beneath her berries, it was for a very practical reason. Delicate fruits can easily be damaged by soil and flooding, but by adding straw to the top layer of soil, you can stop them from dangling on the ground. Barley straw is ideal for this since it’s soft and easy to work with. This mulch layer will also protect certain plants from frostbite in cold weather and will hinder any bugs that attempt to climb onto the fruit. What a nifty gardening hack!

Slide 5 of 28: A time-honored yard hack, there are endless benefits to homegrown fertilizer. By recycling your food scraps you'll reduce the amount of waste that ends up in landfills and limit the money you need to spend on plant food and water. Homemade compost is completely free and feeds the soil with much-needed nutrients. Find a warm, dark spot for your compost bin, fill it with old leaves, lawn mowings and fruit and veg waste, then wait 12 to 18 months until it's ready to use.

© Alzbeta / Shutterstock

Create your own compost

A time-honored yard hack, there are endless benefits to homegrown fertilizer. By recycling your food scraps you’ll reduce the amount of waste that ends up in landfills and limit the money you need to spend on plant food and water. Homemade compost is completely free and feeds the soil with much-needed nutrients. Find a warm, dark spot for your compost bin, fill it with old leaves, lawn mowings and fruit and veg waste, then wait 12 to 18 months until it’s ready to use.

Slide 6 of 28: Every seasoned gardener swears by this method. Adding a layer of mulch to your flower beds and pot plants has several benefits depending on the type you use. Biodegradable mulch, such as wood chippings or bark, can improve the nutrients in the soil, while other options, such as gravel and slate shards, aid with moisture retention and protect plants against extreme weather. Mulch can also prevent weeds from growing and gives your flower beds a neat finish.

 © ronstik / Shutterstock

Add mulch to your soil in summer

Every seasoned gardener swears by this method. Adding a layer of mulch to your flower beds and pot plants has several benefits depending on the type you use. Biodegradable mulch, such as wood chippings or bark, can improve the nutrients in the soil, while other options, such as gravel and slate shards, aid with moisture retention and protect plants against extreme weather. Mulch can also prevent weeds from growing and gives your flower beds a neat finish.

Watch for more of Grandma’s tips in coming posts.

Article by Jen Grimble for LoveMoney

Source: Grandma’s genius gardening secrets that never fail (msn.com)