The No. 1 Reason You Should Call Instead of Text

So many things can keep you from seeing your loved ones in person, from busy schedules to long distances to a rather unexpected pandemic. Fortunately, thanks to modern technology, the people we miss are often only a phone call or text message away. But if you’re someone who’s more prone to typed out messages than verbal ones, you may want to reconsider. According to science, if you want to feel more connected to the people you’re talking to, you should call them instead of texting. A new study, published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, found that communication interactions that included voice, like a phone call or video chat, created stronger social bonds than communication through typing, like text messaging or email. Read on to find out how a call can bridge that gap, and for more things you should never send via type.

Slide 1 of 5: So many things can keep you from seeing your loved ones in person, from busy schedules to long distances to a rather unexpected pandemic. Fortunately, thanks to modern technology, the people we miss are often only a phone call or text message away. But if you're someone who's more prone to typed out messages than verbal ones, you may want to reconsider. According to science, if you want to feel more connected to the people you're talking to, you should call them instead of texting. A new study, published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology, found that communication interactions that included voice, like a phone call or video chat, created stronger social bonds than communication through typing, like text messaging or email. Read on to find out how a call can bridge that gap, and for more things you should never send via type, find out The Most Annoying Text You're Sending All the Time.Read the original article on Best Life.
Article and photo by BESTLIFE©

Voice communication strengthens your bonds with old friends.

In the study, researchers used various experiments to gauge connectedness. In one, they asked 200 people to make predictions about what it would be like to reconnect with an old friend by email or by phone and then assigned people at random to do one or the other. Although people anticipated that a phone call would be more awkward, hearing someone’s voice actually made the experience better.

“People reported they did form a significantly stronger bond with their old friend on the phone versus email, and they did not feel more awkward,” study co-author Amit Kumar, an assistant professor of marketing at the McCombs School of Business, said in a statement.

And it even makes people feel more connected to strangers.

In another experiment, the researchers had strangers connect by either texting, talking over video chat, or talking using only audio. They found that both forms of voice communication—whether video or audio only—made the strangers feel significantly more connected than when they communicated via text. 

People tend to text because they think it’s easier and clearer.

Sabrina Romanoff, PsyD, a Harvard trained clinical psychologist based in New York City, says people tend to text or email instead of calling because of convenience, as they see it as a controlled form of communication where they can “correspond information exactly in the way they intend without unexpected additions by the other person.”

However, texting is more likely to muddy your message.

Romanoff says that in reality, texting can make it hard to determine the true meaning behind a conversation. “A phone call is actually more convenient when considering the net effects of the message,” she explains. “Each party is more present, and therefore, able to gauge the meaning behind the content without ruminating on the endless possible meanings behind words and punctuation.”

Article by Kali Coleman 

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/the-no-1-reason-you-should-call-instead-of-text-according-to-science/ss-BB1aniI3?ocid=msedgntp#image=1

Conversation Starters: Halloween

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What day of the month is Halloween?
Why is Halloween celebrated?
Can you explain the history of Halloween?
How is Halloween celebrated in your country?
Do you believe in ghosts?
What makes you afraid of ghosts?
What are some of the symbols of Halloween?
What kind of costume are you going to wear to the Halloween party?
Is your pumpkin still out ?
Are you still eating Halloween candy?
Why do you like to celebrate Halloween?
Do you believe in magic?
Did you know there were real ‘witch trials’ in the seventeenth century?
Why do you think they happened?
Do you think there are really witches and monsters and creatures living amongst us in the real world, or are those things just from our imagination?
If you could choose to be any monster or creature, what would it be?
What is your favorite magical story?

Character in a book?
Film?
Legend?
If you could use a magical spell, like a love spell, on somebody, would you?
What other countries celebrate Halloween?
Can you describe the best costume you’ve seen?
Is your pumpkin still out?
Are you still eating Halloween candy?
How long does it take for a pumpkin to rot?
Are you going to have a Halloween party?
Would you go out and trick or treat? Who would you go with?
Do you know any Halloween legends?
Do you think Halloween is dangerous?
What do you know about the history of the holiday?
Do you think it is appropriate to celebrate it still today?

http://iteslj.org/questions/

A Surefire Sign Other People Find You Annoying

By Bob Larkin for Bestlife©

Slide 1 of 18: Everyone has annoying traits, whether you sing along to every song on the radio or insist upon keeping "Cotton Eye Joe" as your ringtone. And while some people are comfortable letting you know just how grating they find your behavior, there's one surefire sign that people find you annoying, according to experts—and it's one you're probably not picking up on, either."If you notice that the person's shoulders or feet turn away from you or they look down at the floor (or their phone), it's a sign that they're trying to escape the moment," says licensed clinical psychologist Jamie Long, Psy.D.However, Long says it's also possible that "the topic of conversation got too intense, too one-sided, or is just taking way too long to finish." Either way, it's important to try to ascertain their comfort level and switch gears if need be. That's not the only way you may be putting others off, though—read on to discover signs you may be annoying other people without realizing it. And for more behaviors to nip in the bud, check out these 50 Things You Do Every Day That Annoy Other People.Read the original article on Best Life.
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Everyone has annoying traits, whether you sing along to every song on the radio or insist upon keeping “Cotton Eye Joe” as your ringtone. And while some people are comfortable letting you know just how grating they find your behavior, there’s one surefire sign that people find you annoying, according to experts—and it’s one you’re probably not picking up on, either.

“If you notice that the person’s shoulders or feet turn away from you or they look down at the floor (or their phone), it’s a sign that they’re trying to escape the moment,” says licensed clinical psychologist Jamie Long, Psy.D.

However, Long says it’s also possible that “the topic of conversation got too intense, too one-sided, or is just taking way too long to finish.” Either way, it’s important to try to ascertain their comfort level and switch gears if need be. That’s not the only way you may be putting others off, though—read on to discover signs you may be annoying other people without realizing it. 

1. You always steer conversations back to you.

If anyone’s ever accused you of making conversations about yourself, it’s likely you’re bothering others with this behavior on a regular basis.

2. Most of your conversations are vent sessions.

It may feel great to get out something that’s been weighing on you, but if all of your conversations seem to turn into vent sessions, that can easily rub others the wrong way.

3. You can feel the energy change in a room when you enter.

If the mood suddenly changes the second you set foot in a room, this may be a sign that your pas behavior has made your presence unwelcome.

4. Your conversations are full of awkward silences.

Everyone runs out of topics of conversation from time to time, but it becomes worrisome if it seems to happen every time you talk.

5. Their pupils constrict.

Want to know if you’re annoying someone? A little eye contact will clue you in.

6. Their voice gets louder.

As someone’s level of frustration rises, so will the volume of their voice.

7. They sigh. A lot.

A sigh isn’t just a sigh, at least according to researchers out of Norway, who found in a 2008 study that people tend to sigh when they’re in a negative mood.

8. You hear about parties after the fact.

Just learning that everyone you know was at the “party of the year” last weekend? It might’ve just been an accident, especially if the host insists they “totally emailed you an invite.” But if it happens more than once, you might be getting left off the guest list for a reason.

9. Friends have stopped calling, emailing, or texting you back.

10. They’re avoiding your personal space.

11. Nobody argues with you. Ever.

12. You’re never in group photos on social media.

13. You go in for the hug, they go for the handshake.

14. ​They avoid eye contact.

15. They cross their arms whenever you’re talking.

16. They answer a phone call while you’re in the middle of a sentence.

17. They don’t ask you personal questions.

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/love-sex/this-is-a-surefire-sign-other-people-find-you-annoying-experts-say/ss-BB19Smsu?ocid=msedgntp#image=18

How to Deal With Small Talk When You’re an Introvert

Whether you’re heading to a networking event or going to a party, engaging in small talk can be intimidating and straight-up painful—especially for an introvert. For those of us who are less extroverted, engaging in small talk can often feel forced or meaningless, which increases social anxiety. But instead of panicking (or hiding behind a rock for the next three hours), we’ve compiled seven quick tricks to make engaging in small talk less daunting.

1. Ask plenty of questions.

As an introvert, it’s easy to feel anxious when all the attention is on you. To deter that feeling, ask questions so the focus shifts towards the other person. People love to talk about themselves, so the best way to kick off the  conversation is by asking open-ended questions. This allows the other person to discuss their interests and background, which means you might also discover some common ground.

2. Reduce your anxiety.

While hiding in the bathroom or playing with the dog at a party might seem like a logical alternative to small talk, it’s best to be proactive when it comes to your social anxiety. Don’t go into an event with a negative mindset. If you already think you’re boring and no one will want to talk to you, that’s exactly how you’re going to approach every conversation. Think positive, be true to yourself, and be confident. Most importantly, remind yourself of this: You really have nothing to lose.

3. Refrain from giving short answers.

When the spotlight is on you, don’t get flustered. Take a deep breath and remember that someone is engaging in a conversation with you because he or she wants to. To keep the conversation flowing, try to provide answers that are more than just, “I’m good” or, “That’s cool.” While you might not feel completely comfortable talking about yourself, stick to topics that are of interest to you and the conversation will flow more easily.

4. Consider a compliment.

If you’re unsure on how to begin a conversation, or you simply ran out of topics to talk about, it’s always a good idea to compliment your conversation partner. A simple, “I love your dress! Where did you get it?” can ease the tension and allow you to engage in an easy free-flowing conversation.

5. Be aware of your body language.

Even if you think a conversation is going well, your body language might insinuate the complete opposite. Be mindful of how you position yourself when you talk.

Turn your body to face the person you’re talking to, unfold your arms, and smile. Doing so signifies trust, which might encourage someone to open up more easily. Realistically, no one will engage in a conversation with you if you appear closed off.

6. Be kind to yourself.

Whatever you do, don’t beat yourself up if small talk doesn’t turn into a deep, meaningful conversation. It’s OK to engage in a two-to-three minute chat. Because introverts are introspective people, they tend to micro-focus on their faults and failures. Rather than replaying an event over and over in your mind, view it as a lesson, or learn to let the little things go by laughing it off and moving on.

7. Know how to excuse yourself from the conversation.

Let’s say you’re in the middle of a conversation with someone, but you’ve run out of things to talk about. You don’t want to be rude, but you don’t want the conversation to get awkward either. Don’t panic when this happens. Whether you’re at a networking event or a party, tell that person that you’re going to grab a refreshment, but you’ll speak to them later. Or if someone you know is standing next to you, introduce them to the person you’re talking to and politely excuse yourself from the conversation. Even though you’re probably a professional Irish exiter, these tactics are less awkward and more polite to do.

Source: https://theeverygirl.com/how-to-deal-with-small-talk-when-youre-an-introvert/

Asking Questions in English

Using What, Where, When, Why, Who, and How

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Learning how to ask questions is essential in any language. In English, the most common questions are known as “wh” words because they begin with those two letters: where, when, why, what, and who. They can function as adverbs, adjectives, pronouns, or other parts of speech, and are used ask for specific information. 

Who

Use this word to ask questions about people. In this example, “who” serves as a direct object.

Who do you like?

Who has he decided to hire for the job?

In other instances, “who” serves as the subject. In this case, the sentence structure is similar to that of positive sentences.

Who studies Russian?

Who would like to take a vacation?

In formal English, the word “whom” will replace “who” as the direct object of a preposition.

To whom should I address this letter?

For whom is this present?

What

Use this word to ask about things or actions in object questions.

What does he do at weekends?

What do you like to eat for dessert?

By adding the word “like” to the sentence, you can ask for physical descriptions about people, things, and places.

What type of car do you like?

What is Mary like?

When

Use this word to ask questions about time-related events, specific or general.

When do you like going out?

When does the bus leave?

Where

This word is used to ask about location.

Where do you live?

Where did you go on vacation?

How

This word can be combined with adjectives to ask questions about specific characteristics, qualities and quantities. 

How tall are you?

How much does it cost?

How many friends do you have?

Which

When paired with a noun, this word is used when choosing between a number of items.

Which book did you buy?

Which kind of apple do you prefer?

Which type of computer takes this plug?

Using Prepositions

A number of “wh” questions can combine with prepositions, typically at the end of the question. Some of the most common combinations are:

  • who … for
  • who … with
  • where … to
  • where … from
  • what … for (= why)
  • what … in

Note how these word pairings are used in the following example.

Who are you working for?

Where are they going to?

What did he buy that for?

You can also use these pairings to ask follow-up questions as part of a larger conversation.

Jennifer is writing a new article.

Who for?

She’s writing it for Jane magazine.

Tips

When more general verbs such as “do” and “go” are used, it’s common to use a more specific verb in the reply.

Why did he do it?

He wanted to get a raise.

Questions with “why” are often replied to using “because” as in the following example.

Why are you working so hard?

Because I need to finish this project soon.

These questions are often replied to using the imperative (to do). In this case, the clause with “because” is understood to be included in the answer.

Why are they coming next week?

To make a presentation. (Because they are going to make a presentation.)

Test Your Knowledge

Now that you’ve had a chance to review, it’s time to challenge yourself with a quiz. Provide the missing question words. The answers follow this test.

  1. ____ is the weather like in July?
  2. ____ much is the chocolate?
  3. ____ boy won the race last week?
  4. ____ did you get up this morning?
  5. ____ team won the World Cup in 2002?
  6. ____ does Janet live?
  7. ____ long does the concert last?
  8. ____ food do you like?
  9. ____ does it take to get to New York from Albany?
  10. ____ does the movie begin this evening?
  11. To ____ do you report at work?
  12. ____ is your favorite actor?
  13. ____ house does he live in?
  14. ____ is Jack like?
  15. ____ does the building look like?
  16. ____ does she study English with?
  17. ____ do the people in your country go for vacation?
  18. ____ do you play tennis?
  19. ____ sports do you play?
  20. ____ is your doctor’s appointment next week?

Answers

  1. What
  2. How
  3. Which
  4. What time / When
  5. Which
  6. Where
  7. How
  8. What kind of / What type of
  9. How long
  10. What time / when
  11. Whom – formal English
  12. Who
  13. Which
  14. What
  15. What
  16. Who
  17. Where
  18. How often / When
  19. Which / How many
  20. What time / When

Source: https://www.thoughtco.com/common-wh-questions-1212210

‘Sleep Divorces’ Are on the Rise—Could They Actually Save Your Marriage?

a person wearing a white shirt
JGI/JAMIE GRILL/GETTY IMAGES

We spend nearly one-third of our lives sleeping. Which is great because without it, we get cranky, irritable, cloudy and tired. In fact, research shows chronic lack of sleep even ages our skin. But what happens when the reason you’re not getting your zzz’s is because of your partner? Maybe they snore, roll around too much or blast the AC. This might just call for a “sleep divorce.” With the help of matrimonial attorney and author of The New Rules of Divorce: 12 Secrets to Protecting Your Wealth, Health, and Happiness, Jacqueline Newman, let us explain.

What’s a “sleep divorce”? Simple: A sleep divorce is when a couple makes the mutual decision that they’re not going to sleep in the same bed for the sake of wellness. That could unfold in myriad ways depending on what the problem is. For instance, if the bed is too soft for one person, maybe they sleep on the couch, pull-out, guest room or perhaps even purchase a new bed. If snoring is the issue, the couple may decide to sleep on different floors of the house. Seems strange? Well, according to a survey commissioned by SleepStandards, sleep divorces are more popular than you think—35 percent of couples interviewed are considering separate beds.

But isn’t sleeping separately bad for marriage? Au contraire! The word “divorce” probably makes you think it’s a bad thing, but according to Newman, a sleep divorce actually restores a lot of marriages and relationships. In fact, the whole point of a sleep divorce is to salvage or at least improve the relationship. If sleeping together means one or both partners is losing sleep, then sharing a bed might actually be bad for the marriage. “Culture says we have to sleep next to each other because of intimacy, but what if all we’re doing is keeping each other awake?” Newman asks.

How is sleeping in separate beds good for a relationship? We’ll let Newman explain: “Everyone’s cranky if you don’t get enough sleep—and you take it out on the people who you hold near and dear, most often your spouse.” If your partner is the reason you’re not getting a solid eight hours, your anger and contempt could escalate to a whole new level. A sleep divorce could prevent these negative emotions from simmering to a boil. When we’re better rested, we’re healthier and happier, making us better partners because we’re able to show up. “If you’re getting along and not fighting, does it really matter if you don’t sleep next to each other at night?” Newman wonders. In fact, she recalls a friend who announced her sleep divorce and then said, “You know what? My husband’s much funnier now.”

But what about sex? If you like your sex with a side of sleep, get it done and then retreat to your preferred sleeping arrangements. Keep in mind, this doesn’t mean your relationship has failed; you’re just at a new stage. “It’s just the practicality of life, it doesn’t mean your marriage is doomed,” explains Newman. For couples just starting out, maybe their partner’s snoring is cute, but the reality is intimacy comes in lots of forms, and if spooning all night isn’t working for you, why not get a good night’s sleep so you can actually enjoy your partner when you’re both awake?

Sold. So, how do I ask for sleep divorce? A healthy sleep divorce means the decision is mutual. Newman advises that the couple has to be on same page. “If one person derives huge amount of comfort from snuggling and connection, weigh your needs. Make the decision together.” And if you’re the partner who isn’t so into a sleep divorce, don’t just dismiss the idea, especially if your partner will experience this as rejection. Instead, like every other aspect of your marriage, make sure to communicate, be vocal, address needs and make compromises. Divorce granted.

Question: Have you and your partner ever tried a sleep divorce? What were the results?

Source: Dara Katz for purewow.com

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/relationships/sleep-divorces-are-on-the-rise-but-they-could-actually-save-your-marriage/ar-BB15YPkK?ocid=msedgntp

100-year-old Tortoise Who Saved His Species

a turtle swimming under water: Tortoises "Diego", a species of the Española Island giant tortoise species, is pictured in a breeding centre at the Galapagos National Park in Santa Cruz Island, in the Galapagos archipelago, located some 1,000 km off Ecuador's coast, on June 4, 2013.
© RODRIGO BUENDIA/Getty Images Tortoises “Diego”, a species of the Española Island giant tortoise species, is pictured in a breeding centre at the Galapagos National Park in Santa Cruz Island, in the Galapagos archipelago, located some 1,000 km off…

A 100-year-old Galápagos tortoise named Diego is finally going to get some well-deserved rest and relaxation.

On Monday, Diego and 14 other tortoises returned to their native home of Española Island, located in the Galápagos Islands, after helping to save their species from extinction, according to BBC News.

Diego originally, “officially” retired in January, with expectations to return to Española in March.

Since the 1960’s, the Fausto Llerena Tortoise Center, a breeding facility on Santa Cruz Island, has been using Diego and the other tortoises to help bring up population numbers for their species, The New York Times reported. Diego is thought to have fathered over 2,000 tortoises, about 40 percent of the population that is alive today, according to BBC News.

That’s a lot of work for one tortoise.

So Happy Birthday to Diego and…get some rest man !

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/100-year-old-tortoise-who-saved-his-species-finally-returns-to-his-home-in-the-galapagos-islands-video/ar-BB15zyMo?ocid=msedgntp

64,000 Sea Turtles Swimming During Nesting Season

By Nicol Natale  for Prevention

water next to the ocean: Queensland researchers released drone footage showing thousands of sea turtles swimming near Raine Island in the Great Barrier Reef during nesting season.
© Instagram Queensland researchers released drone footage showing thousands of sea turtles swimming near Raine Island in the Great Barrier Reef during nesting season.

On Tuesday, Queensland researchers from the Department of Environment and Science (DES) released drone footage showing a spectacular sight: Up to 64,000 endangered green sea turtles swimming near the Great Barrier Reef in Australia preparing to nest.

The turtles were swimming around Raine Island, a coral cay off the coast of Queensland, Australia, which is thought to be the largest green turtle rookery in the world. The turtles were getting ready to head to shore so they could lay eggs.

In a statement, officials said they were looking for an alternative way to count the endangered turtles after unsuccessfully using white, non-toxic paint. “Trying to accurately count thousands of painted and unpainted turtles from a small boat in rough weather was difficult,” said Andrew Dunstan, a researcher for the DES. “Using a drone is easier, safer, much more accurate, and the data can be immediately and permanently stored.”

Using the drone footage, they realized the number of sea turtles getting ready to nest was greatly underestimated. “What previously took a number of researchers a long time can now be by one drone operator in under an hour,” said researcher Richard Fitzpatrick from the Biopixel Oceans Foundation.

They were eventually able to count up to 64,000 green turtles, referring to the aggregation as one of the largest ever captured on film.

See the drone video here:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/watch-64000-sea-turtles-swimming-near-the-great-barrier-reef-during-nesting-season/ar-BB15ov9X?ocid=msedgntp