8 Natural Repellents To Keep Your Home Pest Free

Got silverfish, ants, spiders, and more? Try these natural bug repellents found right in your pantry to keep pests out!

You might be surprised (or even horrified) to learn that there are essentially ten quintillion insects roaming the earth at any one time. That’s more than 200 million bugs for every person on the planet, according to the Smithsonian. This might just be one of those times when ignorance is bliss, but now that you know, these powerful, natural bug repellents might just become your new best friend in the home. Many are found right in your pantry!

Try These Natural Bug Repellents

1. Cream of Tartar For Ant Problems

When the ants come marching in, reach for a common culinary pantry product, cream of tartar. Not only does this acidic salt help stabilize egg whites and whipped cream, but it is a powerful ant repellent. Just place a line of cream of tartar where ants typically enter your home, and they won’t cross the barrier.

2. Vinegar To Repel Crawling Bugs

For crawling bugs, including ants and spiders, vinegar is another household staple that helps deter several kinds of insects. Mix equal parts vinegar and water in a spray bottle and wipe down surfaces. Not only will this keep bugs away, but vinegar is a powerful disinfectant. For fruit flies, put cider vinegar and water in a small bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and poke with several small holes using a toothpick to trap the flies. 

3. Cedar For Fleas, Spiders, Silverfish

Small cedar blocks, or sachets filled with cedar chips, work well to deter a number of bugs including fleas, spiders, silverfish, certain ants, moths, cockroaches, termites, and even some flies. Place the cedar in closets, cabinets, drawers, or areas where bugs enter to create a natural bug-free zone.

More natural repellents can be viewed at link below.

Source Link: 8 Natural Repellents To Keep Your Home Bug Free (farmersalmanac.com)

Keeping open body language makes you seem more trustworthy.

Job hunting and interviewing, dating, or just meeting people can leave a wrong impression by doing one thing that implies mistrust or insecurity.

Doing This with Your Hands Makes People Not Trust You, Experts Say

Especially with face masks covering our mouths these days, body language is a huge factor in how we come across. Whether you’re sitting straight up, slouched over, or fidgeting with your pen, people are quick to make judgements based on the little things you do. In fact, experts say that making one common gesture with your hands makes people less likely to trust you. Read on to find out what it is, and for more on why people may be doubting you.

Putting your hands in your pockets makes people not trust you.

If you want to come off as inviting and trustworthy, keep your hands where people can see them, says Susan Trombetti, a relationship expert and CEO of Exclusive Matchmaking. “When people keep their hands in their pockets, it appears they are hiding something. And someone is more likely to be lying because they are hiding their hands,” she explains. Concealing your hands comes across as more controlled, which can be interpreted as “deceitful and untrustworthy,” she notes. “People generally consider individuals with their hands in their pockets to be insecure,” explains Girish Shukla, a mental health and psychology expert.

Keeping open body language makes you seem more trustworthy.

According to Trombetti, someone who is telling the truth—or at least, seems to be—is more likely to keep their hands open and palms up. When your hands are visible, “the physical openness of your body language invites trust,” says Lauren Levy, a sales expert who teaches people in the industry how to appear trustworthy.

“Keeping open hands while talking can give others the idea that you can be trusted and that you know what you are talking about,” Shukla says. “Whenever you expose your palms it means that you are not hiding anything.”

Article and photos provided by Best Life.

Source: Doing This With Your Hands Makes People Not Trust You, Experts Say (msn.com)

The #1 Drink the World’s Oldest Woman Has Every Day

Don’t be afraid to treat yourself to your favorite things.

The Guinness World Record is being held by a 118-year-old French nun named Sister André.

So of course, it’s only natural to want to know all about André’s life in case it holds any shocking secrets to longevity, especially because Andre even survived getting COVID-19 in 2021!

Getty Images

However, it seems as though her secrets to a long life lie in the simple things: helping others and enjoying her favorite foods and drinks every day.

Sister André was born as Lucile Randon in 1904, and grew up in the southern region of France. Most of Randon’s life has been dedicated to helping others, especially through her service as a Catholic nun. But according to CNN, before Randon became a nun, she had spent almost 30 years working in a hospital helping orphans and the elderly, which is something that she started during World War II.

And this desire to help others, which became Sister André’s mission in life, has given her a lasting purpose throughout her entire life. She gave a recent interview to reporters from her hospice home in Toulan, where she told them that working hard to help others is one of her secrets to longevity.

“People say that work kills, for me work kept me alive, I kept working until I was 108,” said Sister André. “People should help each other and love each other instead of hating. If we shared all that, things would be a lot better.”

This comes as no surprise if you know anything about the world’s Blue Zones, which are the five regions of the world with the highest concentrations of centenarians. Among the shared list of habits that many people in these regions practice, having a life’s purpose and dedicating yourself to your community ranks high in importance for them.

While serving others is important to Sister André, she also knows a thing or two about indulgence. In fact, one nursing home resident told CNN that André loves eating chocolate and drinking wine and that she treats herself to one glass of wine every single day!

We can definitely learn a lot from Sister André, especially when it comes to a healthy balance. Life doesn’t have to be all about serving or all about indulgence; we can have both. And it seems like this may be a secret to living a longer, more fulfilling life.

By Samantha Boesch for eat this, not that©

Source: The #1 Drink the World’s Oldest Woman Has Every Day — Eat This Not That

Nearly risk-free I-Bonds to deliver a record 9.62% interest for the next six months

KEY POINTS

  • I bonds, an inflation-protected and nearly risk-free investment, will pay 9.62% through October 2022, the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced Monday.
  • “It’s a milestone for I bonds,” said Ken Tumin, founder and editor of DepositAccounts.com.
  • However, there are purchase limits, you can’t tap the money for one year and there’s a penalty for selling within five years.
Marko Geber | DigitalVision | Getty Images

If you’re eyeing ways to fight swelling prices, I bonds, an inflation-protected and nearly risk-free asset, may now be even more appealing.

I bonds are paying a 9.62% annual rate through October 2022, the highest yield since being introduced in 1998, the U.S. Department of the Treasury announced Monday.

The hike is based on the March consumer price index data, with annual inflation growing by 8.5%, the U.S. Department of Labor reported.

I bonds, backed by the U.S. government, don’t lose value and earn monthly interest based on two parts, a fixed rate and a variable rate, changing every six months.

While the variable rate is 9.62% through October 2022, the fixed rate remains at 0%, according to the Treasury.

The fixed rate stays the same for the 30-year life of the bond, meaning someone who purchased I bonds with a higher fixed rate may beat inflation for at least six months, Tumin said.

Although the fixed rate has been 0% since May 2020, it peaked at 3.6% for six months starting in May 2000.

How to buy I bonds

There are only two ways to purchase these assets: online through TreasuryDirect, limited to $10,000 per calendar year for individuals or using your federal tax refund to buy an extra $5,000 in paper I bonds. There are redemption details for each one here.

You may also buy more I bonds through businesses, trusts or estates. For example, a married couple with separate businesses may each purchase $10,000 per company, plus $10,000 each as individuals, totaling $40,000.

Drawbacks of I bonds

One of the downsides of I bonds is you can’t redeem them for at least one year, said certified financial planner George Gagliardi, founder of Coromandel Wealth Management in Lexington, Massachusetts. And if you cash them in within five years, you’ll lose the previous three months of interest directly before your sale.

“I think it’s decent, but just like anything else, nothing is free,” he said. 

Another possible drawback is lower future returns. The variable portion of I bond rates may adjust downward every six months, and you may prefer higher-paying assets elsewhere, Gagliardi said. But there’s only a one-year commitment with a three-month interest penalty if you decide to cash out early.

Still, I bonds may be worth considering for assets beyond your emergency fund, said Christopher Flis, a CFP and founder of Resilient Asset Management in Memphis, Tennessee.

“I think that the I bond is a wonderful place for people to put the money they don’t need right now,” he said, such as an alternative to a one-year certificate of deposit.

As of May 2, the average savings account yield is under 1%, and most one-year CDs are paying less than 1.5%, according to DepositAccounts.

“But I bonds aren’t a replacement for long-term funds,” Flis added.

By Kate Dore, CFP® for cnbc©

Source: I bonds to deliver a record 9.62% interest for the next six months (cnbc.com)

Nationwide settlement over misleading TurboTax ads

It turns out the Intuit’s TurboTax services weren’t so “free, free, free”

(SHUTTERSTOCK.COM)

As part of a $141 million nationwide settlement announced Wednesday with Intuit, the financial software company behind TurboTax, roughly 370,000 Californians will receive $11.4 million in direct payments.

The agreement, which included 51 attorneys general among others, resolves allegations that TurboTax’s ads for free tax filing services misled consumers and steered low-income taxpayers away from the Internal Revenue Services’ (IRS) Free File Program for which they qualified.

In fact, a 2020 audit by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration found that more than 14 million taxpayers paid for tax filing services they could have accessed for free.

RELATED STORIES

Intuit to pay $141 million settlement over ‘free’ TurboTax ads, including restitution to taxpayers

According to a report from the US Government Accountability Office published last week, while 70 percent of taxpayers are eligible for the IRS Free File Program, less than 3 percent use it.

While this is in part attributed to poor outreach and structure on the government’s part, investigations by ProPublica and officials found Intuit to have knowingly played a role in sowing confusion and guiding taxpayers towards its products instead — products that even when advertised as free often require surprise fees or upgrades to file in the end.

This is especially notable given that the Free File Program, a public-private partnership, was born out of a compromise wherein tax prep companies, including Intuit, agreed to provide free tax filing options for low-income taxpayers in exchange for the government staying out of the tax prep and e-filing market.

Intuit admitted no wrongdoing in the settlement, per a post on its blog. The Mountain View company has faced a number of consumer arbitration claims and was also recently sued for deceptive marketing in its ads by the FTC.

Users who paid for tax services that should have been free between 2016 and 2018 will receive about $30 per relevant year. Covered consumers will automatically be notified and sent checks by mail.

The settlement also requires Intuit to emphasize limitations to TurboTax’s “free” services in advertising.

Article by Marisa Endicott

Source: Nationwide settlement over misleading TurboTax ads includes $11.4 million in payouts for Californians (pressdemocrat.com)

Hackers Exploit a Critical Chrome and Edge Vulnerability, Update Now to Fix It

I posted the Chrome story yesterday however, another browser, Edge, is also at risk. Edge is a Chromium-based browser and needs to be updated against new vulnerabilities.

Google, Microsoft

This vulnerability, called CVE-2022-1096, was reported to Google by an anonymous user or researcher. It appears to affect all Chromium-based browsers, including Opera and Brave. Details on the vulnerability are slim, as Google doesn’t want to share any information that may be useful to hackers

Both Chrome and Edge are supposed to update automatically. That said, you should paste chrome://settings/help or edge://settings/help in your address bar to see that you’re running version 99.0.4844.84 of Chrome or version 99.0.1150.55 of Microsoft Edge.

Source: Google via Forbes and reviewgeek.com/

Google Issues Massive Warning To Users Of Chrome

Google confirmed a plethora of vulnerabilities on their Chrome browser Tuesday, many of which pose a “high” threat level to users.

© REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

Thirty different security issues were discovered in Chrome, which impact users of Windows, macOS, Linux, and mobile devices, according to a blog post shared Tuesday by Google. A majority of the information on the vulnerabilities is not being shared by the technology company, as is standard practice with the organization, Forbes reported.

Use-After-Free (UAF) attacks appear to be the best method for breaking into Chrome, Forbes continued. A UAF attack is a memory exploit and has broken through Chrome security more than 65 times since the start of the year, the outlet reported.

Chrome is likely vulnerable to a new type of “zero-day” hack, according to Forbes. A zero-day hack means that the vulnerability in a platform is known to hackers before Google, or any company, can deploy a fix. At present, every Chrome user is vulnerable to this type of hack, the outlet noted.

Google is set release an update in the coming days to fix the bugs that make these hacks possible. Users can manually update their browsers by using the setting feature if they don’t want to wait for the update to go through automatically, the outlet continued.

Research on hacking suggests that passwords of any type under seven digits can be broken instantly, the Daily Mail stated. Those passwords with eight characters can typically be guessed in under an hour, the report continued.

Article by Kay Smythe for The Daily Caller©

Source: Google Issues Massive Warning To Users Of Chrome (msn.com)

Scammers are targeting your phone. Here’s what to watch for in Part 4

©RapidEye/istockphoto

The Utility Scam

Another dated but still effective fraud is the utility scam. In this case, the criminal pretends to be calling from the water, gas, or electric department in pursuit of an outstanding bill that must be paid immediately to prevent service interruption. This scam often targets not just residents, but small businesses with owners likely too busy to check on the details and more reluctant to risk having their water or lights shut off.

The Neighbor Scam

The neighbor scam employs the caller ID spoof to make it appear that someone is calling the victim’s phone from a local number, which people are more likely to answer. The caller pretends to be speaking for a neighbor in an emergency or even from a school nurse claiming to need personal information for their files.

Jury Duty Scams

Skipping jury duty is a serious matter that can result in real consequences. One of those consequences, however, will not be a phone call from a U.S. marshal or any other government agent threatening arrest if the victim doesn’t immediately pay a fine. That’s the jury duty scam, and although it’s been around for a long time, it still finds new victims every year.

Recovery Scam

The recovery scam just might be the worst of the bunch for one simple reason: it targets victims who have already been victimized. Scammers buy and sell so-called “sucker lists” — records of people who have already been scammed — and use that information to follow up with good news: They’ve recovered the money you lost in the original scam. All they need is your personal data to make sure they have the right person and/or a small fee, and they’ll help you recover the money you lost to the first scammer. There is, of course, no restitution. The scammer is merely double-dipping.

What to Do if You Get a Suspicious Call

Now that you know which scams you’re most likely to encounter, it’s important to know what to do if you think you’ve been targeted. The scammer could be casting a wide net or targeting you specifically. In either case, the actions you take or don’t take could mean the difference between being victimized and avoiding the scam. You might even be able to help authorities nab the criminals responsible for the fraud.

Screen Unfamiliar Calls

The single best way to avoid being taken in a phone scam is to never make contact with the scammer in the first place. That means your best bet in most cases is simply not to answer calls with blocked or private numbers or that you otherwise don’t recognize. “If you do not recognize the phone number on your caller ID, do not answer the phone,” Lavelle says. “Let it go to voicemail or the answering machine. Most telemarketers will hang up and not leave a message. If it’s important, the caller will leave a message.”

Don’t Follow Instructions

Both human scammers and automated robocall recordings often try to get you to take some sort of action just to see if they’ve reached a live person. “Never follow the automated voice asking you to press 1,” Lavelle says. “Do not push any numbers to reach a live operator. This signifies that the autodialer has reached a live number and this will probably lead to more robocalls.”

Block Repeat Offenders

If you’re getting calls regularly from the same few numbers, consider blocking them. “Most cellphone providers allow you to block an incoming number,” Lavelle says. “They work by blocking them, alerting you to a possible robocall, or forwarding suspicious calls to voicemail.”

Try Services Such as Nomorobo

One of the most reliable third-party options, according to Lavelle, is a service called Nomorobo. “It’s a free service available through most phone service providers and is designed to block robocalls and telemarketers,” he says. “While it may not prevent all robocalls from getting through, you are able to identify those calls as your phone will only ring once and the call is then rejected.” 

Set Up the Anonymous Call Rejection Option

Many scammers, as well as telemarketers who are more annoying than predatory, don’t show up on caller ID. Calls from these numbers are the ones you want to eliminate almost entirely, which you can if your phone company offers anonymous call rejection. “Call your phone provider to find out if this option is available for your landline,” Lavelle says. “It lets you screen out calls from callers who have blocked their caller ID information, a tactic of telemarketers.”

Article by Andrew Lisa for cheapism©

Source: Scammers are targeting your phone. Here’s what to watch for (msn.com)

5 Home Security Systems Vulnerable to Hackers

Several popular DIY home security systems can be disabled with nothing more than a laptop and a device the size of a walkie-talkie.

That’s the concerning finding in recent testing from Consumer Reports. Using a technique called a “jamming attack,” thieves can block wireless signals from doors, windows and motion sensors, which lets them enter your property without setting off an alarm.

CR cautions “owners of these systems needn’t panic” because jamming attacks are not very common. But if that’s small comfort, here’s a look at which security systems failed the test and which held up.

©Joni Hanebutt / Shutterstock.com

The most vulnerable home security systems

Two home security systems performed worst in Consumer Reports’ tests of their ability to withstand jamming attacks:

  • Cove Home Security System
  • Eufy 5-Piece Home Alarm Kit

In addition to low ratings on jamming attacks, both of these systems are vulnerable to another kind of hack called “replay disarming.”

This technique involves copying the wireless signal from a keyfob used to disarm your alarm. Consumer Reports points out this is more difficult for thieves to pull off because they would have to be nearby when you are entering the house to capture the signal.

The publication also shared its findings with the alarm makers so they can work on fixing it.

Other vulnerable home security systems

While not performing as poorly as the Cove and Eufy devices, three other systems fell to jamming attacks in tests:

  • Abode Iota All-In-One Kit
  • Ring Alarm Security Kit (second generation)
  • SimpliSafe The Essentials SS3-01

The least vulnerable home security systems

These brands withstood jamming attacks and replay attacks from Consumer Reports:

  • Blue by ADT
  • Ecobee
  • Honeywell Home
  • Kangaroo
  • Ooma

What it means for you

While Consumer Reports says these kinds of attacks are not common, you can still take steps to protect yourself.

Don’t advertise what security system you use with yard signs and window decals. That’s essentially telling thieves which instruction manual they need to look at to hack your system. Instead, use generic signs or decals as a deterrent.

Article by Brandon Ballenger for money talks news©

Source: 5 Home Security Systems Vulnerable to Hackers (msn.com)

Scammers are targeting your phone. Here’s what to watch for in Part 3

Thousands of people are bilked every year by criminals who enter the lives of their victims through their telephones. And while seniors are often the target of scammers, anyone can be taken for a ride. Here’s everything you need to know about phone scams — including some that take advantage of evolving technology like QR codes, and others that use coronavirus fears to their advantage — and how to avoid becoming a victim.

©skynesher/istockphoto

Lottery Phone Scams

When it comes to the lure of easy money, Lavelle offers a piece of advice that comes with virtually no exceptions. “If you receive a phone call about winning a lottery you never entered,” he says, “don’t believe it and hang up the phone. With this type of scam, a con artist will call the victim and say they won a large sum of money but have to pay a fee to facilitate the earnings. Once the scammer receives the wired money, they disappear. Many of these types of calls originate in Jamaica.” The FTC also puts lottery scams toward the top of its concerns and warns of scammers based in Canada — and reminds potential victims that the sale or purchase of cross-border lottery tickets by mail or phone is illegal.

Netflix Phishing Scams

So-called Netflix scams are most likely to come through email or text, but you could get a phone call as well. In this con, the criminal pretends to be from Netflix or another popular streaming service and asks you to update your payment or other private information to avoid a service interruption. In email form, the scam is often accompanied by a dangerous link the scammer wants you to click.

Enduring Scams That Refuse to Die

Some scams have been around for years or even decades, bilking innocent victims out of their money or identities. In some cases, tried-and-true phone scams are updated and reinvented. In other cases, the same old con keeps finding victims year after year.

Predatory Robocalls

Robocalls are nothing new. In fact, they’re so common that most people pay them little mind, which is part of what makes predatory robocalls so dangerous. “In today’s landscape, it is not uncommon to receive multiple robocalls a week on both your landline and your cellphone, even though you’ve registered your phone numbers with the Do Not Call Registry,” Lavelle says. “They’re offering everything from lower credit card rates to free vacations and medical alert devices. It’s not only annoying, but many of these calls come with a high probability of a scam.”

Caller ID Spoof

The caller ID spoof manipulates caller ID software to add an extra layer of legitimacy to the con. The scammer makes the caller ID display your bank’s actual name or phone number on your phone, which lulls victims into a false sense of security before the call is even answered.

Spear Phishing

Phishing scams have long been identified as frauds that try to gain the victim’s trust by presenting some of the victim’s personal information. If the scammer has the last four digits of my Social Security Number and my ZIP code, the victim assumes, the caller must truly be from the bank or the phone company. Spear phishing expands on the old phishing scam by offering some information in an effort to get the customer to surrender the rest. For example, the “bank” might call under the guise of trying to sort out irregular spending patterns on your debit card. To gain your trust, the swindler will offer the last four digits of your SSN then ask you to provide the rest of the number “for security purposes.” Spear phishing often works in conjunction with the so-called caller ID spoof.

Source: Scammers are targeting your phone. Here’s what to watch for (msn.com)

View Part 4 tomorrow.