We Tasted 5 Queso Dips and This Is the Best

Growing up, cheese dip wasn’t a condiment you’d generally find in my pantry or fridge, so my early memories of queso are both few and fairly specific. The first involves my older sister and me watching Clueless on the floor of our living room, with a freshly microwaved bowl of cheese dip and a bag of Fritos between us. The others include visions of dunking cafeteria soft pretzels in plastic cups of orange goo. Ah, childhood.

These days, queso is a quintessential element of my regular burrito bowl order. But while I have opinions on which Mexican fast-food joint has the best (Chipotle and Moe’s are top contenders), it was high time I crowned the best jarred cheese dips on grocery shelves, in case I ever need to curb a craving.

Slide 2 of 6: Per 2 Tbsp (33 g): 20 calories, 1 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 190 mg sodium, 4 g carbs (0 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 0 g protein Spice, spice, baby! Stonewall Kitchen's Chile Con Queso is packing heat, and I'm still deciding whether or not that's a good thing. Though the ingredients list includes things like dehydrated cheese mix and veggies like tomatoes, onions, sweet green peppers, and sweet red peppers, all that comes through the flavor profile is jalapeño and chipotle pepper. In other words, the cheese in this cheese dip was sorely lacking, which makes me question its high price point.         $7.49        at Instacart       Buy Now  RELATED: Sign up for our newsletter to get daily recipes and food news in your inbox!

5. Stonewall Kitchen Chile Con Queso

Per 2 Tbsp (33 g): 20 calories, 1 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 190 mg sodium, 4 g carbs (0 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 0 g protein

Spice, spice, baby! Stonewall Kitchen’s Chile Con Queso is packing heat, and I’m still deciding whether or not that’s a good thing. Though the ingredients list includes things like dehydrated cheese mix and veggies like tomatoes, onions, sweet green peppers, and sweet red peppers, all that comes through the flavor profile is jalapeño and chipotle pepper. In other words, the cheese in this cheese dip was sorely lacking, which makes me question its high price point. $7.49 at Instacart

Slide 3 of 6: Per 2 Tbsp (30 g): 25 calories, 1.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 170 mg sodium, 2 g carbs (1 g fiber, 0 g sugar), 1 g protein As far as dairy-free cheese dips go, Siete Foods is a solid contender. The brand's Spicy Blanco Cashew Queso is made with cashews (obviously), tomatoes, nutritional yeast, onion, green bell peppers, white vinegar, jalapeños, and coconut milk powder, plus spices that, when blended together, somehow taste close to actual cheese dip. But while it's delicious, you can tell it's not actually cheese, which is why it doesn't take a top-three spot on the list. (It's still a great alternative.)         $5.99        at Instacart       Buy Now

4. Siete Foods Spicy Blanco Cashew Queso

Per 2 Tbsp (30 g): 25 calories, 1.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 170 mg sodium, 2 g carbs (1 g fiber, 0 g sugar), 1 g protein

As far as dairy-free cheese dips go, Siete Foods is a solid contender. The brand’s Spicy Blanco Cashew Queso is made with cashews (obviously), tomatoes, nutritional yeast, onion, green bell peppers, white vinegar, jalapeños, and coconut milk powder, plus spices that, when blended together, somehow taste close to actual cheese dip. But while it’s delicious, you can tell it’s not actually cheese, which is why it doesn’t take a top-three spot on the list. (It’s still a great alternative.) $5.99 at Instacart

Slide 4 of 6: Per 2 Tbsp (32 g): 50 calories, 3.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 250 mg sodium, 4 g carbs (0 g fiber, 0 g sugar), 1 g protein I was a little skeptical when I unscrewed the top of LOCA's potato queso jar for the first time. Its contents looked like creamy, mashed sweet potato, only yellow, and it didn't smell very appetizing. But none of that mattered after I heated a few spoonfuls up in the microwave for a minute or so and took my first bite.You'd never know this queso is completely void of cheese—it gets all of its cheesy-goodness from plant-based ingredients, like potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, green chile, nutritional yeast, and various spices. The mild flavor isn't spicy but is still rich with flavor, and, when warmed, it has the consistency of traditional queso. Drizzle this over nachos, and carnivores will never know the difference.RELATED: The Best Nachos in Every State         $25 for 2 jars        at Loca       Buy Now  RELATED: The easy guide to cutting back on sugar is finally here.

3. LOCA Mild Plant-Based Potato Queso

Per 2 Tbsp (32 g): 50 calories, 3.5 g fat (0 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 250 mg sodium, 4 g carbs (0 g fiber, 0 g sugar), 1 g protein

I was a little skeptical when I unscrewed the top of LOCA’s potato queso jar for the first time. Its contents looked like creamy, mashed sweet potato, only yellow, and it didn’t smell very appetizing. But none of that mattered after I heated a few spoonfuls up in the microwave for a minute or so and took my first bite.

You’d never know this queso is completely void of cheese—it gets all of its cheesy-goodness from plant-based ingredients, like potatoes, carrots, tomatoes, green chile, nutritional yeast, and various spices. The mild flavor isn’t spicy but is still rich with flavor, and, when warmed, it has the consistency of traditional queso. Drizzle this over nachos, and carnivores will never know the difference.

$25 for 2 jars at Loca

Slide 5 of 6: Per 2 Tbsp (31 g): 40 calories, 2.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 280 mg sodium, 3 g carbs (0 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 1 g protein Target's Good & Gather Salsa Con Queso looks like light orange queso but tastes like white queso. It's very creamy and solidifies at the top when left alone for a few minutes (and when I say "few" I mean two or three at most), which had me reminiscent of the cheese cups school cafeterias serve with soft pretzels.Though it's mild, the cheese dip does have a spice that hits the back of your throat after the fact and makes your breath feel like a kind of jalapeño-zested smoke. It's also marketed as a "salsa con queso," but it's definitely the other way around. It has a cheese base, with subtle flecks of vegetables like bell pepper throughout. This is an overall solid pick for chip and pretzel dipping.         $2.49        at Target       Buy Now

2. Good & Gather Salsa Con Queso

Per 2 Tbsp (31 g): 40 calories, 2.5 g fat (0.5 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 280 mg sodium, 3 g carbs (0 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 1 g protein

Target’s Good & Gather Salsa Con Queso looks like light orange queso but tastes like white queso. It’s very creamy and solidifies at the top when left alone for a few minutes (and when I say “few” I mean two or three at most), which had me reminiscent of the cheese cups school cafeterias serve with soft pretzels.

Though it’s mild, the cheese dip does have a spice that hits the back of your throat after the fact and makes your breath feel like a kind of jalapeño-zested smoke. It’s also marketed as a “salsa con queso,” but it’s definitely the other way around. It has a cheese base, with subtle flecks of vegetables like bell pepper throughout. This is an overall solid pick for chip and pretzel dipping.$2.49 at Target

Slide 6 of 6: Per 2 Tbsp (33 g): 40 calories, 2.5 g fat (1 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 280 mg sodium, 5 g carbs (1 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 1 g protein When I think of jarred cheese dip, I instantly think of Tostitos, and there's a reason for that: It's delicious. Not too thick and not too runny, Tostitos Salsa Con Queso boasts a bright orange hue. It's made with a Monterey Jack Cheese base (already starting off with a kick), and additional ingredients like jalapeño peppers and chili peppers really bring home the spice. The sauce itself is smooth and rich, but it does contain chunks of veggies that add to the heat. It's not what I was imagining: a cheese sauce with globs of salsa incorporated into the recipe, like Smucker's Goober Peanut Butter and Jelly. It's better.         $4.99        at Amazon       Buy Now  Read more:We Tried 5 American Cheese Brands & This Is the Best20 Best and Worst Cheeses in AmericaThe Best & Worst Snacks in America—Ranked!

1. Tostitos Salsa Con Queso (Medium)

Per 2 Tbsp (33 g): 40 calories, 2.5 g fat (1 g saturated fat, 0 g trans fat), 280 mg sodium, 5 g carbs (1 g fiber, 1 g sugar), 1 g protein

When I think of jarred cheese dip, I instantly think of Tostitos, and there’s a reason for that: It’s delicious. Not too thick and not too runny, Tostitos Salsa Con Queso boasts a bright orange hue. It’s made with a Monterey Jack Cheese base (already starting off with a kick), and additional ingredients like jalapeño peppers and chili peppers really bring home the spice. The sauce itself is smooth and rich, but it does contain chunks of veggies that add to the heat. It’s not what I was imagining: a cheese sauce with globs of salsa incorporated into the recipe, like Smucker’s Goober Peanut Butter and Jelly. It’s better. $4.99 at Amazon

So, what’s your favorite?

Article by Julia Guerra for eatthis,notthat.com

Source: We Tasted 5 Queso Dips and This Is the Best (msn.com)

‘I Walked off Nearly 150 Pounds—Even Through North Dakota Winters’

My name is Roxanne Mullenberg, and I’m a 42-year-old bank project manager living in Fargo, ND.

As an adult, I’ve always seen 350 pounds or so on the scale. I tried weight loss programs here and there that never worked. This was before apps, and manually counting calories was exhausting and not realistic. I tried a program where I drank shakes, but I never felt full or satisfied, and I actually gained weight. I also tried joining a gym, but I could never focus on nutrition at the same time as exercise; it was one or the other, and I never saw much change.

About two years ago, my office set up a summer walking challenge, and I signed up. My goal: Walk 400 miles by September. Having a concrete challenge really motivated me and gave me a reason to exercise. The accountability was also super helpful. Every week, they sent out an email to everyone with each participant’s mileage recaps, and, heck yeah, I wanted to be one of the top participants! I finished in the top quarter of the group, logging 4 to 5 miles a day.

I’ve kept it up, and I’m still walking 4 miles a day. I wake up and walk in the morning, then do 40 minutes at lunchtime every day, then do another walk at night. I split up my 80 to 90 minutes of activity a day because I would never have that uninterrupted stretch. I even walked a 10k for my 42nd birthday this year.

Fargo’s weather isn’t great for walking year-round, but I didn’t let that stop me. My goal this winter was to walk at least one of my miles outside each day to get some fresh air and make it feel different from all my indoor activity (like walking around the house while on phone calls). Over the winter, that meant forcing myself outside during bitterly cold, 20-below days. I’d put on wool socks, big boots, snow pants, and go, even when there was a no-travel advisory. Whether it’s raining, snowing, sleeting, hailing, minus-20 degrees, or 95 degrees, I’m going to be out there.

Finding a nutrition plan that works for me

Even with walking consistently, the weight wasn’t coming off. I knew I also had to change my eating habits. Coworkers at the bank recommended that I try Profile by Sanford, a health and nutrition program developed by medical experts at Sanford Health, one of the world’s largest healthcare providers. When you join the program, you’re paired with a health coach (that you meet with in-person at one of their retail locations or online) to get a custom meal plan and learn sustainable lifestyle changes. There are essentially three phases for Profile: Reboot, Adapt, and Sustain. Starting with the Reboot stage, I had a protein shake in the morning; another one as a mid-morning snack; a protein shake and 2 cups of veggies and a fat (like avocado or olive oil) for lunch; then, a Profile fiber tea and Profile protein bar as an afternoon snack. For supper, I’d have a protein (like chicken or fish), 2 more cups of veggies, and a fat, followed by another shake. Though I was hesitant about any plan that incorporated shakes because of my past experiences with that being all you ate, these ones tasted great, were in addition to real food, and were perfect for my on-the-go lifestyle, so I didn’t have to stop at a drive-through.

Seeing results and setting new goals

When I started with Profile in February 2020, I was at 358 lbs. Now I’m at 209, so 149 lbs down! I’ve gone down 10 pants sizes—getting a whole new wardrobe is fun! I’ve had other major wins, too. Before, my blood pressure was concerningly high and I was close to requiring medication, and now it’s drastically dropped to a healthy range. I’m feeling more comfortable in my own skin. I have more energy, and as I’m gaining confidence, I’m more willing to try new things.

I used to think runners were crazy—why would you do that unless you were running from something?–but now I think about how much more quickly I would get my steps in and it’s appealing to me, so I might try training for a 5k run next. I have walking down, so now it’s asking my body, What else can I do? These days, I’m up for new challenges, and nothing can slow me down.


By Roxanne Mullenberg, As Told To Sarah Z. Wexler for Prevention©

Source: ‘I Walked off Nearly 150 Pounds’ (prevention.com)

Never Put These 7 Things on Your Resume

Are you preparing a resume? It’s natural to want to tell prospective employers all about yourself — but some things are better left unsaid.

Remember, you have only a limited amount of space to convince someone you would be a good hire. So, avoid including anything that might offend, or cause an employer to question your abilities.

Following are some key things to avoid on your resume.

Criticism of past employers

A sure way to put off a potential employer is to waste space on your resume criticizing past employers or supervisors. You may feel perfectly justified in your criticism, but the purpose of a resume is to showcase talents and abilities, not to air grievances.

Don’t give prospective employers the impression that you are disloyal or generally disgruntled. Instead, write about your positive relationships and accomplishments. Tell people about the good things you can bring to their business if they give you the opportunity.

Excuses for past problems

If you have been laid off or dismissed from a job, you may feel the need to explain the situation in your resume. It’s natural to want to tell your side of the story, especially if you feel that you were not at fault.

However, it’s easy to spend too much time discussing disappointments and missed opportunities. You may give the impression you aren’t taking responsibility for your own mistakes.

A better approach is to write about past successes. If you are called upon to explain a layoff or dismissal in an interview, be honest, but brief. Let people know that your focus is on the future.

Irrelevant skills

When a job applicant lists skills unrelated to job performance, it can appear that he or she has no valuable skills to showcase. Instead, describe things that you’ve learned that have improved your performance on the job. For example:

  • Do you have great internet skills?
  • Did you pursue special training to enhance your contribution in past jobs?
  • Are you attending school to earn an advanced degree or certificate?

Old achievements

Focus on recent achievements in your resume. If something happened 10 or 15 years ago, prospective employers may get the impression your successes are behind you.

So, leave out that Cub Scout merit badge.

Poor grammar and spelling

If you submit a resume with misspellings, typos or grammatical errors, you are unlikely to score a job interview. Even if you are in a field where the proper use of language seems unimportant, most employers want to know that their hires have good communication skills.

Grammatical mistakes on your resume can signal you’re careless and possibly unreliable. A resume free of errors lets recruiters know you’re serious about the job.

Too much information

Recruiters have a limited amount of time to sort through applications. So, keep it brief.

When screening applicants, recruiters look for experience, training and past employment. If you write in great detail about every job you’ve ever had, you may overwhelm. Worse, the information that makes you stand out as an applicant might get overlooked.

In most cases, submitting one or two pages worth of information is adequate. You can expand on your qualifications once you get to the interview stage.

Anything that isn’t true

You may be tempted to exaggerate skills, training or accomplishments. However, doing so always is a mistake. Once you put something in writing, you can’t take it back. Even if it helps you land a job, the lie may resurface years later and damage your reputation or career.

So don’t exaggerate qualifications. If you don’t have a college degree, describe the training you’ve received on the job. The best way to get a resume filled with accomplishments is to do work that you’re proud of.

Article written by Emmet Pierce for moneytalksnews©

Photo credit: ©stock-Asso / Shutterstock.com

Source: Never Put These 7 Things on Your Resume (msn.com)

‘iPhone storage almost full’ after installing iOS 15? Here’s what NOT to do

If you’ve just installed iOS 15 and you’re now seeing a message that says that your ‘iPhone storage almost full,’ then you’re not alone.

In fact, it seems like it’s quite a widespread problem, and the exact cause is unclear.

It’s certainly not a lack of storage space. Some affected users report having tens of gigabytes free.

So, if you’re affected by this ‘iPhone storage almost full’ bug, what should you do?

Do nothing.

Wait it out for a fix from Apple.

What you shouldn’t do is start deleting stuff because:

  1. That doesn’t appear to fix the problem
  2. That’s a path to data loss and more headaches

I’ve spoken to an Apple support agent contact who tells me that Apple is aware of this bug, there’s nothing that support techs can do about it, and that it’s something that Apple will need to fix as part of the iOS 15.x update.

Article by Adrian Kingsley-Hughes for zdnet©

Source: ‘iPhone storage almost full’ after installing iOS 15? Here’s what NOT to do (msn.com)

Classic Chicken Pot Pie: Comfort Food At Its Best!

Soothe your soul with this comfort food favorite! Store-bought crust makes it super easy.

Classic Chicken Pot Pie

A delicious chicken pot pie made from scratch with carrots, peas, and celery for a comfort food classic.

INGREDIENTS  

  • 3 cups  cooked chicken (rotisserie chicken works well), shreddedOne sweet potato, peeled, chopped and steamed until just cookedParsnips, diced
  • 1 bag frozen mixed vegetables–cooked just short of fully cooked according to package directions.
  • 1/3 cup  butter
  • 1/3 cup  onion, chopped
  • 1/3 cup  all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon  salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon  black pepper
  • 1 3/4 cups  chicken broth
  • 2/3 cup  milk

INSTRUCTIONS 

  • Directions: Preheat oven to 425° F. Place one pie crust in the bottom of a 9-inch pie plate.*  In a large bowl, combine the chicken, cooked vegetables, sweet potato and parsnips, and season taste. Set aside. In a saucepan over medium heat, cook the onions in the butter until soft and translucent. Stir in the flour, salt and pepper. Slowly stir in chicken broth and milk. Simmer over medium-low heat until thick. Remove from heat, pour over the chicken and vegetables and mix well. Pour mixture into the prepared pie shell and add top crust. Cut away any excess dough and seal the edges. Make several small slits in the top to allow steam to escape. Bake in the preheated oven for 30 to 35 minutes, or until pastry is golden brown and filling is bubbly. Cool for 10 minutes before serving.

by Susan Shanagan for Farmers Almanac

Source: Classic Chicken Pot Pie: Comfort Food At Its Best! – Farmers’ Almanac (farmersalmanac.com)

This Is The #1 Most Surprising Source of Food Poisoning

When food poisoning strikes, it usually strikes hard and fast—taking you off your feet for at least 24 hours, and in some cases, can lead to a life-threatening illness. According to the CDC, 1 in 6 Americans get sick from contaminated food or beverages and 3,000 die from foodborne illness each year.

In the past, people predominantly considered eggs and raw meat the main offenders of food poisoning. But, in recent years, that’s changed as developments in production methods and widespread distribution are bringing about other culprits. Turns out, vegetables and fruits have become more likely to be contaminated as they move through the supply chain, according to the CDC. For instance, kale and parsley are two products that have recently been recalled due to the presence of listeria and E coli.

What’s more, the same developments in distribution mean a single bad batch of food can make people sick in wide-reaching areas of the country—and sometimes, all over the world. The contaminated parsley, for example, was distributed to retailers and wholesalers in Illinois, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina.

Reigning in a disease that keeps popping up everywhere with no direct source can be hard to do. While the CDC and other organizations are at work monitoring production, issuing recalls, and fixing any issues with the supply chain, the last line of defense will always be you.

What follows are the CDC’s stats on which foods are most likely to cause food poisoning, plus the four simple steps you can take to prevent getting sick when enjoying the foods you love: clean, separate, cook, and chill

1. Vegetables

Vegetables like leafy greens (8% of food-borne illnesses, the CDC says), seeded vegetables (8%), sprouts (2%), herbs (2%), and root vegetables (2%) are by far the #1 most likely food to be contaminated with pathogens—accounting for 22% of all foodborne illnesses, the CDC says. Surprisingly, healthy leafy greens—also a food people tend to eat raw—is at the top of the list. Remember the huge romaine lettuce recall of 2018?

2. Poultry

Chicken (12% of food-borne illnesses) and turkey (8%) can harbor many pathogens and are a huge source of salmonella contamination.

3. Pork and Beef

Pork and beef combined account for 19% of foodborne illnesses. When cooking pork (10%) and beef (9%), follow the same guidelines for cooking poultry and be sure to abide by the minimal temperature guidelines.

4. Seafood

Contaminated seafood causes 9% of food poisoning cases. Again, you need to cook seafood, including shellfish (5%) and fish (4%) to a safe temperature and reheat leftovers.

5. Fruits

Sadly, fruit is responsible for 9% of all foodborne illnesses, the CDC says. Fruits can be contaminated anywhere along the supply chain. We’ve seen it with blueberries, watermelon, peaches, cantaloupe, and especially pre-cut varieties. Try to cut your own fruit and thoroughly wash it before you cut it. (Do this even if you won’t eat the peel because the germs will work their way into the food if you cut through the skin.)

6. Eggs

By now, everyone knows to be careful with eggs, which are responsible for 7% of all foodborne illnesses. They are notorious for harboring salmonella. Be sure to cook your eggs thoroughly and be careful when consuming foods that contain raw eggs—yes, that includes raw cookie dough.

7. Dairy

Raw dairy (5% of foodborne illness cases) is really the issue here. In the U.S. you are unlikely to encounter these products in the supermarket since most are illegal. But still, be cautious and keep your food out of the “danger zone” and use proper preparation techniques. The CDC describes the “danger zone” as between 40°F and 140°F for longer than 2 hours (or 1 hour if it’s hotter than 90°F outside).

8. Grains and beans

Uncooked grains and beans are responsible for 4% of food poisoning cases. The CDC even issued a special warning against eating raw flour. (Seriously, stop eating raw cookie dough!) In terms of beans and other canned food, throw away any cans that are dented and use proper procedures for canning foods at home.

9. Other culprits

This category includes foods that don’t fit in the top 15 categories and other federally regulated items, such as alcohol, coffee, beverages, ice, condiments, and dietary supplements. These account for 7% of foodborne illnesses.

If this is a lot of information to swallow, remember the four actions: clean, separate, cook, and chill.

Eatthis,notthat article by Meaghan Cameron. Photo credit: Eatthis,notthat

Source: This Is The #1 Most Surprising Source of Food Poisoning, CDC Says (msn.com)