Memorial Day Challenge

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See how well your students remember the Memorial Day terms they’ve been learning with this Memorial Day Challenge. Choose the correct word for each clue from the multiple-choice options provided.

Thanks to Memorial Day Wordsearch, Crossword Puzzle, and More (thoughtco.com)

Guide to Perennial Flowers by Season

You can have a succession of color from spring to fall by choosing plants with bloom times that overlap with each other. Use these suggestions for sun and shade by season to get started.

By Deb Wiley for BHG©

Perennials are a must-have in your garden because of their ability to come back year after year, usually growing even stronger and more beautiful with age. But unlike annuals that can bloom non-stop for months, most perennials have a relatively short bloom season, lasting from just a few days to a few weeks. You can still ensure plenty of flowers from your perennials through the seasons by choosing varieties with staggered bloom times. And don’t be afraid to pack in the plants for the best color show: Where three or four types of annuals can brighten a bed all season long, you might need a dozen different perennials to make sure something is blooming from spring to fall. Start planning your continuously blooming garden by selecting a combination of these spring, summer, and fall-blooming perennials for sun and shade.

Plan Your Prettiest Garden Yet with this Guide to Perennial Flowers by Season
Bleeding heart has beautiful flowers as well as foliage.
 | CREDIT: PETER KRUMHARDT

Spring Seasonal Perennials for Shade

These spring flowers will brighten any shady area. Planted in low light, these seasonal perennials are low-maintenance and low-risk in attracting pests. You can count on these early-bloomers to kickstart your garden every spring.

Iberis sempervirens, candytuft

Candytuft produces masses of snowy white blooms. | CREDIT: DENNY SCHROCK

Spring Seasonal Perennials for Sun

Need a little something more to liven up your sunny space? These sun-loving perennials spring back year after year with dozens of blooms and beautiful color. Equipped for growing in the hot sun, many of these pretty perennials are also tough and drought-tolerant.

bright red astilbe xarendsii fanal

Astilbe produces colorful wands of small flowers, held above its foliage. | CREDIT: DENNY SCHROCK

Late Spring to Early Summer Seasonal Perennials for Shade

Say hello to the first days of summer with these perennials that love the shade. Bright colors and lush foliage make for exciting accents in a shady corner spot. Park a bench near your shade garden, grab a book, and relax with a view of your gorgeous perennials.

close up of peony flowers

Peonies come in an assortment of colors, including several shades of pink. | CREDIT: KARLA CONRAD

Late Spring to Early Summer Seasonal Perennials for Sun

Welcome sunny days and warm weather with plants that can beat the heat. There’s plenty of variety among these low-maintenance early summer flowers, so it should be easy to choose a few that fit into your dream garden plan.

Catmint and Pink bee balm garden near red home

The soft purple flowers of catmint combine well with the pink blooms of bee balm in this garden. | CREDIT: PETER KRUMHARDT

Summer Seasonal Perennials for Sun

When the heat starts to set in, it’s time for hardy, drought-resistant perennials to take over. You’ve got dozens of choices for summer flowers that can beat the heat, so go ahead and plant as many as you can fit in your yard.

purple flowering hostas lining walkway in garden

Often grown for their attractive leaves, many varieties of hostas also have eye-catching flowers. | CREDIT: BOB STEFKO

Summer Seasonal Perennials for Shade

These perennials bloom in the summer but don’t necessarily enjoy the sun’s rays. Find a shady, cool spot in your garden for these low-maintenance plants.

russian sage perovskia atriplicifolia

When in bloom, Russian sage looks like a purple haze. | CREDIT: JOHN STRAUSS

Late Summer and Early Fall Seasonal Perennials for Sun

Summer is coming to an end, but autumn is just around the corner. Feel the soft, cool breeze and smell the fresh scent of these beautiful fall flowers as the leaves start to turn. Add these colors to your space to help the summer season live on just a little longer.

patch of flowering todadlily

The dainty flowers of toad lily light up shade gardens in fall when not much else is in bloom. | CREDIT: DENNY SCHROCK

Late Summer and Early Fall Seasonal Perennials for Shade

The sunny days may be dissolving, but these seasonal perennials will still thrive. Enjoy a few last blooms through the changing leaves with these shade-loving fall flowering plants. These seasonal perennials will perfectly complement a fall garden color palette.

Source: Perennial Flowers by Season | Better Homes & Gardens (bhg.com)

How to Clean Your Shower Head in a Few Easy Steps

Taking a nice, hot shower is one of the great simple joys in life. But if your water stops flowing freely, the mere idea of showering might stop you cold! Luckily, there’s a quick and easy fix for improving your water flow and pressure: All you have to do is clean your shower head! If you’ve never done this before, it may seem like a daunting task. But we can tell you how to clean a shower head in just a few easy steps. It really is so simple—we promise!

How to deep clean your shower head.

© Vladimir Grigorev / EyeEm – Getty Images gettyimages-1195223907

When shower heads fail to provide strong, constant water pressure, it’s often because the tiny holes are clogged with sediment built up from tap water, bacteria, and mold. If this sounds gross…that’s because it is! You should deep clean your shower head at least once a month to remove mineral deposits like limescale. Limescale not only slows water flow and reduces water pressure, but it can also serve as a breeding ground for health-threatening bacteria. To ensure that you and your family are showering in the cleanest possible conditions, follow the directions below.

You’ll need:

  • A gallon-size plastic food storage bag
  • Distilled white vinegar
  • A rubberband
  • A clean toothbrush
  • Baking soda

Some methods call for removing the shower head, but we promised you this would be easy—so let’s do it the easy way! Start by filling a gallon-size plastic bag with vinegar. Place your shower head in the bag and secure the bag to the shower arm with a sturdy rubber band or some heavy-duty tape or string. Make sure that the entire shower head is submerged in vinegar, adding more if necessary.

What kind of vinegar do you use to clean a shower head?

Distilled white vinegar is one of the best natural cleaners out there. This nontoxic cleaning marvel kills some household bacteria, dissolves hard-water deposits, and cuts through grime. It’s also colorless so it won’t stain surfaces. Plus, it’s affordable, and you’re likely to have it on hand in your pantry whenever you feel the need to clean your shower head.

How long should you soak your shower head in vinegar?

Let your shower head soak for a few hours. If there is an excessive amount of buildup, you should soak it overnight for best results.

When you’re ready, remove the bag and use a clean toothbrush to scrub away any remaining buildup or residue, if necessary. Then, use a dry microfiber cloth to wipe down the surface of the shower head.

How do you remove limescale from a shower head?

If the limescale buildup is really bad, you may want to go the extra mile (with minimal effort). To tackle stubborn deposits, simply add a few tablespoons of baking soda to the vinegar before soaking your shower head. The natural abrasive will help open clogged passages.

It’s as simple as that! Now, we can appreciate that this may not be your favorite activity, but it’s totally worth it. By following this easy how-to, you’ll be singing in the shower in no time!

Article by Tierney McAfee for The Pioneer Woman©

Source: How to Clean Your Shower Head in a Few Easy Steps (msn.com)

This Home Necessity Is Disappearing From Store Shelves

 © Provided by Best Life

Experts say a paint shortage is hitting stores.

If you’re looking to redecorate your home in the near future, you may want to leave painting off your to-do list. Experts say it could be hard to find the paint you need. “Some of the most common used paints are out of stock,” Mike Marcewicz, founder of Mike’s Painting and Home Improvements, told Bay News 9. According to Chemical & Engineering News, paint makers are not receiving their full orders of raw materials and having to pay higher prices for the supply they do get, which has led to a fewer paint products hitting store shelves.

The paint shortage was exacerbated by this year’s major winter storm.

Paint supply chain Sherwin-Williams was already suffering as a result of the COVID pandemic. However, the February winter storm that hit Texas added further constraints to the supply chain.

Increased demand for paint is not helping the situation either.

This paint shortage is coming at a time when demand for paint is increasing—which will only make things worse, experts say. We’re approaching painting season, after all. Summer is typically regarded as painting season because it is the optimal time to paint your home exterior due to warm weather and scarce rain, according to Teel Painting.

You’ll likely have to pay more for the paints that you can find.

If you do find any paint in stores, it will likely be marked up from what you’re used to paying. Sherwin-Williams has already issued a price increase on consumer paint brands as a result of shortages and increased pricing of raw materials. And more price hikes may be coming.

Article by Kali Coleman for BestLife

Source: This Home Necessity Is Disappearing From Store Shelves (msn.com)

8 Stinging Caterpillars All Home Gardeners Should be Aware of

Protect Yourself

Most gardeners are aware of the slugs, bugs, and other pests that can destroy their plants. This includes many caterpillars, but a few can hurt the gardener as much as the garden. Their stings or hard spines might smart enough to warrant steering clear and taking extra precautions to keep them away from your leafy greens. Some are unmistakable, and others take a little know-how to keep them out of the garden and away from working hands.

 © istockphoto.com

Flannel Moth Caterpillar (The Asp)

The flannel moth caterpillar, also known as the puss caterpillar, or “the asp,” is covered in fine silky hair that hides its poisonous spines. Once those spines pierce the skin, they cause a painful stinging rash that can last for several days. They’re found in Texas and a few other Southern states. However, they’re not common and live mostly in trees. Their furry bodies are hard to mistake. As long as you know what they look like, you should be able to avoid them.

Saddleback Moth Caterpillar

Slide 3 of 9: The brightly colored saddleback (moth) caterpillar is far more striking than the moth it becomes. Found in Alabama and Florida, these little guys have a fleshy pair of horns on both ends of their bodies with a bright green back and dot in the center. Once you’ve seen a picture, it’s easy to see where they get their name. The hairs on their horns contain an irritating venom that causes swelling and a painful rash.

The brightly colored saddleback (moth) caterpillar is far more striking than the moth it becomes. Found in Alabama and Florida, these little guys have a fleshy pair of horns on both ends of their bodies with a bright green back and dot in the center. Once you’ve seen a picture, it’s easy to see where they get their name. The hairs on their horns contain an irritating venom that causes swelling and a painful rash.

Io Moth Caterpillar

Slide 4 of 9: The Io moth caterpillar’s green body is covered in black-tipped venomous spines. These caterpillars live in the eastern and midwestern United States. They can be seen living together and “marching” in single file in their early stages before they venture out on their own to enter the cocoon phase. Their intense green bodies blend very well with summer foliage, making it easy to accidentally brush against the body and get a painful sting.  Related: How To: Get Rid of Caterpillars

The Io moth caterpillar’s green body is covered in black-tipped venomous spines. These caterpillars live in the eastern and midwestern United States. They can be seen living together and “marching” in single file in their early stages before they venture out on their own to enter the cocoon phase. Their intense green bodies blend very well with summer foliage, making it easy to accidentally brush against the body and get a painful sting.

Stinging Rose Caterpillar

Slide 5 of 9: The stinging rose caterpillar’s strange appearance might attract attention but avoid this brightly colored, striped, and horned caterpillar. The stinging rose is found only in the eastern United States, and it’s relatively uncommon. These caterpillars prefer rose foliage (hence their name), dogwood, apple, cherry, oak, poplar, maple, hickory, and bayberry. Some develop red or orange stripes, while others are yellow. They’re hard to miss, and their bright colors warn enemies of their venom.

The stinging rose caterpillar’s strange appearance might attract attention but avoid this brightly colored, striped, and horned caterpillar. The stinging rose is found only in the eastern United States, and it’s relatively uncommon. These caterpillars prefer rose foliage (hence their name), dogwood, apple, cherry, oak, poplar, maple, hickory, and bayberry. Some develop red or orange stripes, while others are yellow. They’re hard to miss, and their bright colors warn enemies of their venom.

The Spiny Oak Slug

Slide 6 of 9: The spiny oak slug has stinging hairs on its many extended lobes. Their body features mottled stripes, making them a striking specimen. They typically hide on the underneath side of foliage, so they are difficult to detect until brushing the hairs. Most people experience a painful sting. However, there’s a small percentage of people who have a more serious reaction to the sting and may require medical attention. The good news is that these caterpillars are not particularly common, even though they are found throughout North America.

© Wikimedia Commons via Innotata

The spiny oak slug has stinging hairs on its many extended lobes. Their body features mottled stripes, making them a striking specimen. They typically hide on the underneath side of foliage, so they are difficult to detect until brushing the hairs. Most people experience a painful sting. However, there’s a small percentage of people who have a more serious reaction to the sting and may require medical attention. The good news is that these caterpillars are not particularly common, even though they are found throughout North America.

White Flannel Moth Caterpillar

Slide 7 of 9: The black, yellow, and red-colored white flannel moth caterpillar has tufts of long hair coming out of its yellow mounds. Those long black hairs don’t sting, but the short hairs at the base of the tufts do. These caterpillars come out in late summer throughout southern, midwestern, and eastern areas of the United States. Once the caterpillar goes through metamorphosis, it comes out a silky white moth that’s not venomous whatsoever.  Related: 10 Ways Your Backyard Can Hurt You

 © Wikimedia Commons via Jarekt

The black, yellow, and red-colored white flannel moth caterpillar has tufts of long hair coming out of its yellow mounds. Those long black hairs don’t sting, but the short hairs at the base of the tufts do. These caterpillars come out in late summer throughout southern, midwestern, and eastern areas of the United States. Once the caterpillar goes through metamorphosis, it comes out a silky white moth that’s not venomous whatsoever.

Monkey Slug Caterpillar

Slide 8 of 9: The monkey slug caterpillar doesn’t look much like a caterpillar or a slug, really. In a way, it resembles a crumbled, dying leaf. Its tentacles and thick hair disguise the sharp spines that house its venom. Most people wouldn’t want to pick up this strange creature because of its odd, arachnid-like appearance, but the stinging spines seal the deal on avoiding this New England native.

© Wikimedia Commons via Satyrium-commonswik

The monkey slug caterpillar doesn’t look much like a caterpillar or a slug, really. In a way, it resembles a crumbled, dying leaf. Its tentacles and thick hair disguise the sharp spines that house its venom. Most people wouldn’t want to pick up this strange creature because of its odd, arachnid-like appearance, but the stinging spines seal the deal on avoiding this New England native.

Buck Moth Caterpillar

Slide 9 of 9: Buck moth caterpillars love the oak trees predominantly found in the eastern United States, but they also show up in some midwestern and southern states. These dark-colored caterpillars feature tufts covered in venomous spines that cause a red, stinging rash. They come out in the spring and are readily found in and around oak trees.

Buck moth caterpillars love the oak trees predominantly found in the eastern United States, but they also show up in some midwestern and southern states. These dark-colored caterpillars feature tufts covered in venomous spines that cause a red, stinging rash. They come out in the spring and are readily found in and around oak trees.

Article by Stacey L. Nash  for bobvila©

Source: 8 Stinging Caterpillars All Home Gardeners Should be Aware of (msn.com)

Here’s What’s Coming to Netflix in June 2021

On Wednesday, May 19, the streaming service announced the movies, TV shows and documentaries coming this June. Spoiler alert: You’re going to have a long list of things to watch under the sun.

For starters, the world’s hottest no dating dating show better known as Too Hot to Handle is back with 10 sexy new singles. The 10-episode reality show will feature contestants trying to find a happily ever after. There’s just one thing in the way of love and $100,000: They must follow the rules of no kissing, no heavy petting and no self-gratification of any kind.

If you’re more of a movie buff, you’re also in luck! Oscar-winning films like Hilary Swank‘s Million Dollar Baby and Bradley Cooper‘s Silver Linings Playbook will also be available to stream.

And, after much anticipation, comedian Kevin Hart will star in the Netflix film called Fatherhood, a heartfelt comedy-drama about loss and parenting from director Paul Weitz.

Before we say goodbye to the month of May, pull out your calendars and reminder binders. It’s time to make a note of what you’ll need to watch throughout the month of June in our guide below.

© Provided by E! Lakeshore Entertainment

June 1

Abduction

American Outlaws

Bad Teacher

Black Holes | The Edge of All We Know

CoComelon: A Sunny Day for Play

Cradle 2 the Grave

Flipped

Fools Rush In

Happy Endings: Season 1—3

I Am Sam

Love Jones

Million Dollar Baby

Ninja Assassin

Seven Souls in the Skull Castle: Season Moon Jogen

Seven Souls in the Skull Castle: Season Moon Kagen

Stand by Me

Starsky & Hutch

Streets of Fire

Super Monsters: Once Upon a RhymeSwordfish

The Adventures of Sonic the Hedgehog: Season 1

The Best Man

The Big Lebowski

The Wedding Guest

The Wind

What Women Want

June 2

2 Hearts

Alone: Season 7

Carnaval

Kim’s Convenience: Season 5

une 3

Alan Saldaña: Locked Up

Creator’s File: GOLD

Dancing Queens

Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon Eternal The Movie: Part 1 / Part 2

Summertime: Season 2

June 4

Breaking Boundaries: The Science of Our Planet

Feel Good: Season 2

Sweet Tooth

Trippin’ with the Kandasamys

Xtreme

June 5

Kitty Love: An Homage to Cats

June 7

Vampire Academy

June 9

Awake

Fresh, Fried & Crispy

LA’s Finest: Season 2 Tragic Jungle

June 10

A Haunted House 2

Camellia Sisters

Locombianos

June 11

Love (ft. Marriage and Divorce): Season 2

Lupin: Part 2

Skater Girl

Trese

Wish Dragon

June 13

Picture a Scientist

The Devil Below

June 14

Elite Short Stories

June 15

FTA

Let’s Eat

Life of Crime

Power Rangers Dino Fury: Season 1

Rhyme Time Town: Season 2

Sir! No Sir!

Unwind Your Mind

Workin’ Moms: Season 5

June 16

Lowriders

Penguin Town

Silver Skates

June 17

Black Summer: Season 2

Hospital Playlist: Season 2

Katla

Silver Linings Playbook

The Gift: Season 3

June 18

A Family

Elite: Season 4

Fatherhood

Jagame Thandhiram

The Rational Life

The World’s Most Amazing Vacation Rentals

June 19

Nevertheless

June 22

This Is Pop

June 23

Good on Paper

Murder by the Coast

The House of Flowers: The Movie

Too Hot to Handle: Season 2

June 24

Godzilla Singular Point

Sisters on Track

The Naked Director: Season 2

The Seventh Day

June 25

Sex/Life

The A List: Season 2

The Ice Road

June 26

Wonder Boy

June 28

Killing Them Softly

The Seven Deadly Sins: Dragon’s Judgement

June 29

StarBeam: Season 4

June 30

America: The Motion Picture

Lying and Stealing

Sophie: A Murder in West Cork

Written by Mike Vulpo for Enews©

If You Sleep This Much, Your Dementia Risk Is High

© Provided by Best Life

While you know not getting enough sleep can make it difficult to function the next day, many of us are still not snoozing for the recommended seven hours a night, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); the agency says one in three adults are getting less than that. In addition to that feeling of grogginess you have after not catching enough zzz’s, there are other long-term effects skimping on sleep can have on you later in life. In fact, a new study of nearly 8,000 adults who were followed for 25 years found proof that getting a certain number of hours of sleep per night can also affect your brain health, making you much more prone to dementia. Read on to find out what the researchers discovered and how much sleep is the real bare minimum.

Sleeping six hours a night or less puts you at risk for dementia.

The new study, published on April 20 in the scientific journal Nature Communications, found that sleeping six hours a night or less a night was linked to an increased risk of dementia in people between 50 and 60 years old.

Researchers from the French health research institute Inserm analyzed data from a long-term study by University College London, which followed 7,959 British individuals between 1985 and 2016. They compared the health of adults who didn’t get enough sleep to people who slept the recommended seven hours.

Overall, 521 participants developed dementia over the course of the study and the patients were an average of 77 years old when diagnosed. The results show that participants who slept seven hours a night had the fewest cases of dementia. There was a 30 percent increase in dementia risk in those who consistently clocked in a maximum of six hours a night in their 50s and 60s.

“Many of us have experienced a bad night’s sleep and probably know that it can have an impact on our memory and thinking in the short term, but an intriguing question is whether long-term sleep patterns can affect our risk of dementia,” Sara Imarisio, PhD, Head of Research at Alzheimer’s Research U.K., said in a statement in response to the new study. “We know that the diseases that cause dementia start up to two decades before symptoms like memory loss start to show, so midlife is a crucial time for research into risk factors.”

Another recent study says getting less than five hours of sleep could double your risk of developing dementia.

Earlier this year, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Boston College found that even less sleep means an even greater dementia risk. The study, published in the journal Aging in February, compiled data from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) on people 65 and older who are eligible for Medicare. The researchers compared 2,810 seniors who got poor sleep to those who slept an average of seven to eight hours a night over the course of five years. They found that people over 65 who reported sleeping less than five hours per night appeared to be twice as likely to develop dementia.

“Sleep deficiency at baseline, when the average age of participants was 76 years old, was associated with double the risk of incident dementia and all-cause mortality over the next 4 to 5 years,” Charles Czeisler, MD, a senior author of the study and chief of the Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, said in a statement. “These data add to the evidence that sleep is important for brain health and highlight the need for further research on the efficacy of improving sleep and treating sleep disorders on the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and mortality.”

Slide 4 of 5: Alzheimer's researcher Imarisio said one issue with the newer Nature Communications study, and with the link between sleep and dementia in general, is it "cannot tease apart cause and effect." "While it suggests that persistent lower sleep duration was linked with an increased risk of dementia, it did not find an association between longer than average sleep duration and dementia risk," she notes."We know that changes in sleep are commonly reported in individuals with dementia," Claire Sexton, DPhil, director of Scientific Programs & Outreach at the Alzheimer's Association, told USA Today last month. "There has been a chicken and the egg debate about what comes first and whether impaired sleep is a consequence of having dementia or whether it can be a contributing factor to its development."According to Sleep Foundation, people with dementia or Alzheimer's Disease frequently experience restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), REM sleep behavior disorder, and depression, all of which can affect sleep. And cognitive decline can affect how restorative sleep is. There are three stages of sleep: first comes light sleep; then deep sleep, called slow-wave sleep; and finally, dream sleep, called REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, according to the Sleep Foundation. "Slow-wave sleep and REM sleep are critical parts of how sleep works to restore the body and mind," the experts explain. "People with dementia spend less time in slow-wave sleep and REM sleep and more time in the earlier stages of sleep."

People with dementia are often affected by sleep disorders, but the cause and effect is unclear.

Alzheimer’s researcher Imarisio said one issue with the newer Nature Communications study, and with the link between sleep and dementia in general, is it “cannot tease apart cause and effect.” “While it suggests that persistent lower sleep duration was linked with an increased risk of dementia, it did not find an association between longer than average sleep duration and dementia risk,” she notes.

“We know that changes in sleep are commonly reported in individuals with dementia,” Claire Sexton, DPhil, director of Scientific Programs & Outreach at the Alzheimer’s Association, told USA Today last month. “There has been a chicken and the egg debate about what comes first and whether impaired sleep is a consequence of having dementia or whether it can be a contributing factor to its development.”

According to Sleep Foundation, people with dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease frequently experience restless legs syndrome, periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), REM sleep behavior disorder, and depression, all of which can affect sleep. And cognitive decline can affect how restorative sleep is. There are three stages of sleep: first comes light sleep; then deep sleep, called slow-wave sleep; and finally, dream sleep, called REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, according to the Sleep Foundation. “Slow-wave sleep and REM sleep are critical parts of how sleep works to restore the body and mind,” the experts explain. “People with dementia spend less time in slow-wave sleep and REM sleep and more time in the earlier stages of sleep.”

In addition to getting sufficient sleep, there are plenty of other things you can do to reduce your dementia risk.

According to Imarisio, there are a few other things that can help stave off cognitive decline in addition to sleep. “While there is no sure-fire way to prevent dementia, there are things within our control that can reduce our risk,” Imarisio said. “The best evidence suggests that not smoking, only drinking in moderation, staying mentally and physically active, eating a balanced diet, and keeping cholesterol and blood pressure levels in check can all help to keep our brains healthy as we age.

Article by Danielle Cinone for BestLife

Source: If You Sleep This Much, Your Dementia Risk Is High, New Study Says (msn.com)