This Is How Your Anxiety Is Hurting Your Health

BESTLIFE article by Adam Shalvey 

Slide 1 of 14: Anxiety is the most common mental health illness in the United States, affecting 40 million adults each year, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA). And it comes in all shapes and sizes: panic disorder, OCD, PTSD, social anxiety, separation anxiety, specific phobias, and so on. What's more, the stress that accompanies anxiety disorders can interfere with your day-to-day life and also lead to serious health complications, the Mayo Clinic says. Here are 13 ways anxiety may be hurting your health right now. And for more on the well-being of your mind, This Is the No. 1 Mental Health Mistake You're Making Right Now.Read the original article on Best Life.

Anxiety is the most common mental health illness in the United States, affecting 40 million adults each year, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA). And it comes in all shapes and sizes: panic disorder, OCD, PTSD, social anxiety, separation anxiety, specific phobias, and so on. What’s more, the stress that accompanies anxiety disorders can interfere with your day-to-day life and also lead to serious health complications, the Mayo Clinic says. Here are 13 ways anxiety may be hurting your health right now.

1. It makes it harder to breathe.

Shortness of breath and hyperventilation are common symptoms of anxiety that are concerning, but can usually be managed effectively. People with preexisting respiratory conditions, however, may face serious challenges related to anxiety. 

2. And it’s causing you to have stomach problems.

Even our digestive systems can’t escape the reach of stress. In part, this is due to a close connection between our brains and our guts, as demonstrated when we get butterflies just by thinking about an important event. Anxiety can cause abdominal cramping, inflammation, ulcers and eventually lead to more consuming conditions like irritable bowel syndrome.

3. It’s causing you to gain weight.

In response to anxiety, our bodies release “stress hormones,” which have the ability to affect weight gain in a number of ways. For instance, they increase blood sugar levels, and when gone unused, excess glucose in the body may begin to build up as fat. As stimulants, stress hormones also draw heavily on the body’s energy resources. This in turn creates an increased demand for fuel, especially high calorie fuels like sugar and fat.

4. You are getting headaches more than usual.

Anxiety is a well-known cause of tension headaches and migraines. Stress can be both a cause and a symptom of headaches, but “if you suffer from an anxiety disorder, you may have a higher likelihood of developing migraine headaches” Michael Korzi, a senior physician assistant at Gateway Medical Group–UPMC in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, told UPMC HealthBeat.

5. You’re sleeping poorly.

Which came first: the insomnia or the anxiety? While anxiety is a very common symptom of sleep deprivation, the stress and worries associated with anxiety are also recognized as causes of many sleep disorders. Some people even become anxious about the idea of sleep. “Sleep dread is extremely common,” Matthew Edlund, MD, director of the Center for Circadian Medicine in Sarasota, FL, told WebMD. The result can be a ruthless cycle that leaves a person physically and mentally exhausted and puts the health of both their body and mind at risk. 

6. It weakens your immune system.

Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, PhD, and Ronald Glaser, PhD, were early pioneers in psychoneuroimmunology, the study of how our mental state affects our physical health. Their research on the well-being of college students during exams paved the way for decades of studies that show how chronic stress can lead to a weakened immune system. For example, we now know that long-term anxiety may slow the healing of wounds, weaken your body’s response to vaccines and increase our risk of contracting diseases. 

7. You experience more physical pain.

We typically think of anxiety as an ailment of our minds, not our bodies, but the tension caused by anxiety can have very physical symptoms, according to Harvard Health. Stress may lead to targeted pain like headaches and sore muscles as well as an all-consuming condition like fibromyalgia, which results in chronic pain throughout the body.

8. It puts you at a higher risk for diabetes.

Diabetes is a condition in which the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it does make, resulting in abnormally high blood sugar levels. When anxious, our bodies release hormones that also elevate blood sugar levels. Studies show that prolonged periods of stress may contribute to the onset of diabetes and can potentially make existing conditions worse. 

9. And it makes heart disease more likely.

Heart disease is the leading killer of Americans, and stress is linked to a number of factors that increase our risk of heart disease. For example, anxiety can increase blood pressure, raise cholesterol levels, and cause the buildup of plaque in our arteries. Anxiety may also lead to unhealthy behaviors like overeating, smoking, and heavy drinking—all of which can contribute to heart disease.

10. It causes intimacy issues.

Not surprisingly, anxiety can have a negative impact on the sex drives of both men and women. Stress can impact our physical experience during sex too, though, including lower arousal levels and increased pain. For men in particular, anxiety may contribute to erectile dysfunction and impotence. “If you have a ‘busy mind’ and are distracted during sex, it’s going to be harder to focus on your arousal, the pleasurable sensations, or orgasm.” Rachel Needle, PsyD, a sex therapist and licensed psychologist at the Center for Marital and Sexual Health of South Florida, told Self in 2017.

11. And may make it harder for you to get pregnant.

An inability to conceive can cause severe tension for women and couples. Anxiety may actually be the cause of infertility in some cases, though this is debated within the scientific community. What we do know is that stress can cause a woman’s menstrual cycle to fluctuate or even stop temporarily, which may greatly affect her ability to become pregnant. Stress can also reduce sperm viability in men.

12. You’re more vulnerable to broken heart syndrome.

Following a highly stressful or emotional event, people can experience a temporary heart condition called broken heart syndrome. Symptoms include sudden chest pain and shortness of breath. “Its presentation isn’t subtle. People think they’re having a heart attack.” Lauren Gilstrap, MD, a cardiologist at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, told the American Institute of Stress. Even though Broken Heart Syndrome may feel like a heart attack, there’s actually no physical evidence of blocked arteries and the condition is usually treatable.

13. It’s causing you to become depressed.

Though anxiety and depression are distinct conditions, they frequently occur together. “Being depressed often makes us anxious, and anxiety often makes us depressed,” Nancy B. Irwin, PsyD, said in a statement. Shared symptoms include nervousness, irritability, and difficulty sleeping, and concentrating. Although neither disorder necessarily causes the other, many people who suffer from depression have a history of anxiety.

Bored? Try Shopping Online for the Holidays

Article from People ©

Deck the halls — a little early! Half of Americans are already online shopping for the holidays because they’re bored at home, according to new research.

a person sitting at a table using a laptop computer: Half of the respondents polled in a new survey said they will have already started shopping for the holidays by October

© Getty

 Half of the respondents polled in a new survey said they will have already started shopping for the holidays by October. Of those polled, 15 percent, had already started their holiday shopping in August.

And as respondents are thinking about their holiday spending, they’re also having to think about their holiday travel plans. Seventeen percent of respondents still plan on traveling this holiday season, and of these respondents, 21 percent will spend more on their travel than they did last year.

Regardless of their travel plans, nearly half of those surveyed said they will do their holiday shopping online this year.

Respondents also shared that as they’re shopping earlier and buying more gifts, 27 percent plan on buying more apparel and accessories this year than they did last year.

A quarter of respondents also said they plan on purchasing more electronics for the holidays this year. And about seven in 10 respondents said they’re more likely to buy something on sale now, rather than waiting for the traditional Black Friday or Cyber Monday sales.

So happy shopping everyone!

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/foodanddrink/foodnews/over-half-of-americans-are-already-shopping-online-for-the-holidays-because-they-re-bored/ar-BB19lM36?ocid=msedgntp

WOMEN’S PUFFER JACKETS FOR THE COLD WEATHER

I have an inside scoop that this is the latest trend for fall and winter, puffer jackets. That’s right! Check it out:

The padded puffer coat is a fashion hero piece and an investment that you will wear season after season. From quilted down jackets to insulating hooded bomber styles, there are cozy coat options for every occasion.

Free People Pippa Packable Puffer Jacket,

Stone Nylon Diamond Quilted Hooded Puffer Jacket

STONE NYLON DIAMOND QUILTED HOODED PUFFER JACKET

Women's Warm Core Down Coat

Women’s Warm Core Down Coat from LL Bean

Best Trendy Puffer Coat: Orolay Women’s Thickened Down Jacket

Best On-The-Move Puffer Coat: Lululemon Wunder Puff Jacket,

Hey. Like it or not, the cold is coming. Get ready for it.

Rich Men Are Twice as Likely to Have This Deadly Condition

BESTLIFE article by Kali Coleman

Many people dream of wealth, while others have already secured more money than they could possibly use in one lifetime. But sometimes, it truly is “more money, more problems.” In fact, your income may play a part in your health. According to new research, rich men are actually twice as likely to have this deadly health condition: high blood pressure.

The Japanese study, which was presented at the 84th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society in early August, examined the relationship between household income and blood pressure by observing 4,314 employees with daytime jobs—all of whom started their work in 2012 with normal blood pressure levels. Researchers divided the workers into four groups, according to annual household income: less than around $48,000 (5 million Japanese yen), $48,000 to around $76,500 (8 million Japanese yen), $76,500 to $95,500 (10 million Japanese yen), and then $95,500 or more per year.

Over a two year period, researchers found that the men who made more than $95,500 were twice as likely to develop high blood pressure as men in the lowest income category, making less than $48,000 a year. Men in the middle income ranges still had a higher chance of having higher blood pressure, but only about 50 percent higher.

“High blood pressure is a lifestyle-related disease,” Shingo Yanagiya, co-author for the study, said in a press statement. “As a physician seeing these patients, I wanted to know if risk varies with socioeconomic class, to help us focus our prevention efforts.”

High blood pressure is extremely problematic from a health standpoint. After all, uncontrolled high blood pressure can result in multiple health problems, including heart attack, stroke, heart failure, kidney disease or failure, vision loss, sexual dysfunction, angina, and peripheral artery disease, according to the American Heart Association.

Not only that, but high blood pressure is also known as the “silent killer” because many people don’t experience any symptoms or warning signs to indicate that their health is suffering. And that’s why it’s such a deadly condition. According to the World Health Organization, more than a billion people suffer from high blood pressure globally, and it’s one of the major causes of premature death worldwide, killing around eight million people each year.

However, results for the women in the study did not mirror the men’s results. In fact, women with higher household income actually tended to have a lower risk of developing high blood pressure, according to the researchers.

“Our study supports this: Men, but not women, with higher household incomes were more likely to be obese and drink alcohol every day. Both behaviors are major risk factors for hypertension,” Yanagiya said.

To avoid this deadly condition, Yanagiya recommends that men start to control their behaviors by keeping alcohol consumption at moderate levels and engaging in steps for better health, such as “eating healthily, exercising, and controlling weight.” 

Slide 2 of 5: Not getting a good night's sleep won't just make you more tired the next day. A 2019 study published in the Psychosomatic Medicine journal observed 300 men and women who had no history of heart problems. Recording their blood pressure and sleep efficiency, researchers found that after two nights, poor sleepers had increased blood pressure both during their bad night of sleep and the following day. And for more on men's health, learn which 50 Signs of Poor Health Men Should Never Ignore.

 © Provided by Best Life

1. You’re a bad sleeper.

Not getting a good night’s sleep won’t just make you more tired the next day. A 2019 study published in the Psychosomatic Medicine journal observed 300 men and women who had no history of heart problems. Recording their blood pressure and sleep efficiency, researchers found that after two nights, poor sleepers had increased blood pressure both during their bad night of sleep and the following day.

2. You’re often eating late at night.

Late-night eating is bad for your blood pressure. According to a 2018 study led by the American Heart Association, consuming 30 percent or more of a day’s calories after 6 p.m. resulted in a 23 percent higher risk of developing high blood pressure or hypertension. 

3. You’re not getting enough vitamin D.

Lower levels of vitamin D have been linked to higher blood pressure. A 2014 study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal found that for every 10 percent increase in one’s vitamin D levels, there was an 8 percent decrease in the risk of developing high blood pressure. And for more reasons you might need to up your vitamin intake, check out these 20 Surprising Signs You Have a Vitamin Deficiency

4. You’re not flossing.

Not flossing can have more implications than a stern lecture from your dentist. A 2015 study published in the Journal of Periodontology found that poor oral hygiene can actually lead to high blood pressure. Moderate to severe gum disease resulted in a 22 to 49 percent risk of high blood pressure.

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/rich-men-are-twice-as-likely-to-have-this-deadly-condition-study-finds/ss-BB19bC0J?ocid=msedgntp#image=5

Tricks That Will Help Your Garden Survive Winter

Article by the Reader’s Digest Editors  

Slide 1 of 10: Use thermometers and barometers to track the temperature and know when bad weather is approaching. Thermometers should be placed in an area without any direct sunlight for an accurate reading. A barometer is needed to gauge changes in atmospheric pressure, as rapid fluctuation is a sign of unstable weather. Another easy way to note atmospheric pressure is to pay attention to birds. If they’re flying low to the ground, barometric pressure is low. High-flying birds indicate higher barometric pressure. Trying to accurately predict what the winter weather will be? Here's how accurate the Farmer's Almanac has predicted the weather.

 © iStock/txking

Understand the weather

Use thermometers and barometers to track the temperature and know when bad weather is approaching. Thermometers should be placed in an area without any direct sunlight for an accurate reading. A barometer is needed to gauge changes in atmospheric pressure, as rapid fluctuation is a sign of unstable weather. Another easy way to note atmospheric pressure is to pay attention to birds. If they’re flying low to the ground, barometric pressure is low. High-flying birds indicate higher barometric pressure. 

Keep wind out

Protect young or delicate plants from wind by hammering a few stakes in the ground surrounding them. Then, wrap a burlap barrier around the stakes to create a barrier that should deflect harsh winds. With young trees, wrap the trunks with burlap or commercial tree wrapping to prevent wind damage. These wrappings can be removed after the trees are more mature, or in about a year.

Prevent constant freezing and thawing

The constant freezing and thawing of plants can be as harmful as cold temperatures. Use mulch to limit damage by spreading three inches of mulch on the ground surrounding plants to help maintain a constant temperature. Then, cover with netting, chicken wire, or tree branches to protect from wind. But remember that once a plant has been damaged by frost, it most likely cannot be saved and the smartest move is to simply remove it from your garden. Keep soil healthy when it warms up by learning how to compost.

Remember the east-west line

When planning your garden, remember that the sun rises and sets to the south of the east-west line during wintertime. This will cast long shadows on the north side of your home, reducing sunlight and limiting the types of plants that will thrive in these areas. Additionally, winter light is more subdued to eastern exposures than areas facing south or west.

Shield small plants

If you know bad weather is around the corner and want to protect your small plants, cover them with a plastic bag, cardboard box, upside-down flowerpot, or even a plastic laundry basket to protect them. Whatever covering you choose, make sure to weigh it down with a stone or a brick. Or, drape a thick blanket or quilt over plants before nightfall to trap soil heat and protect plants from light frost. We’ll go ahead and add “blanket” to our list of must-have garden tools!

Consider plant hardiness

For plants that aren’t particularly hardy, plant on the side of the house placing south or southeast. The proximity to the house will protect the plant from severe winter winds and keep it warmer, and the plant will be given sun exposure in the mornings.

Protect early-blooming trees

Prevent damage to early-blooming trees by planting them on the north side of the house or on a north-facing slope. This will delay or lessen light exposure and provide safer, more gradual thawing. Plants that blossom early should also be obscured for direct morning sun, as a gradual thaw will minimize the damage done by frost. 

Create shade

Vines, shrubs, and trees that are found near walls can be protected from cold temperatures with a frost shade. Mount a piece of wood at the top of a fence or wall and use it to hang a piece of canvas or tarp. When temperatures drop, use it to cover plants. Raise the shade when it warms up, then lower it in the late afternoon to conserve heat for the chilly night ahead.

Go against your instincts

Run a sprinkler over delicate plants on cold nights. As the water freezes on the plants, it will give off heat and keep them warmer than the surrounding air. This trick is often used to protect fruit trees to protect crops from unruly weather.

Resist spreading salt

Though you may be tempted to sprinkle salt over walkways and driveways to prevent icy slips, remember that the runoff from spreading salt can damage plants. Instead, use wood ashes, sand, gravel, sawdust, or fertilizer to keep these areas safe.

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/career/10-clever-tricks-that-will-help-your-garden-survive-winter/ss-BB199ovr?ocid=msedgdhp#image=10

What Should You Plant in a Small Backyard?

Article by Lauren Wellbank for Martha Stewart

a person sitting in a garden: Getty / Kathrin Ziegler
© Provided by Martha Stewart Living Getty / Kathrin Ziegler

Just because your yard is short on room doesn’t mean you are limited on planting options. According to our experts, all it takes is a little bit planning to turn your small outdoor space into a major design opportunity. From incorporating a variety of plants to create a more nuanced garden to being intentional with every shrub or bush’s placement, you can easily fake the illusion of a larger area.

Think beyond dwarf plants.

Having a small back yard doesn’t mean that you’re limited to dwarf plants. The same basic design principles you’d use in any yard or garden apply in your miniature space, says Erin Schanen, the creator of The Impatient Gardener. “This means incorporating trees, shrubs, and flowers, but with an eye toward size,” she explains. Just make sure you’re checking the mature height and width of each variety—a tree that grows to 30 feet wide in 10 or 20 years is not a good choice for you. “Consider trees and shrubs with a columnar habit: You’ll get the scale of a larger plant, without taking up a huge amount of space width-wise,” she notes.

Plant with purpose.

Schanen says it’s especially important to limit your plant roster in a small garden: “You are far better off picking just a few plants and mass planting them (in groups of five or more) than to have just a couple of many different varieties.” And texture will play an even more important role here, so look for contrast in form and feature; we like the height and fine texture of a taller grass juxtaposed against something with larger leaves and showy flowers. 

Play up shaded spaces.

If you’re limited on space and sunlight, Adrienne R. Roethling, the Director of Curation and Mission Delivery at Paul J. Ciener Botanical Garden, says to get creative by planting shade-loving flora like Hostas, which come in an array of colors and sizes, with grasses like Hakone grass, Hakonechloa macra, or ferns (we like the Japanese Painted variety). “Plants that have similar textures but different colors than Hosta would be the coral bells, Heuchera,” Roethling adds. In some climates, they can take more shade or stay evergreen in winter, which will give you a garden that stays green year-round.

Incorporate some potted plants.

Utilizing pots and containers in a garden is always a good idea, regardless of its size, explains David Morello, a garden designer and founder of David Morello Garden Enterprises. “There is something wonderful about incorporating a container into a spot like a garden bed where it is least expected,” he says. “Keep your selection simple and group them together to create a focal point. The grouping could be a collection of pots that you collect—each one distinct and beautiful.” Morello says as long as they are cohesive, the containers don’t all have to match: “Being creative is half the fun.”

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/home-and-garden/what-should-you-plant-in-a-small-backyard/ar-BB19aQMm?ocid=msedgdhp

Create A Morning Routine That Reduces Anxiety And Stress

Article by Kelsey Borresen for Huffpost©

“Morning routines are powerful and set our pattern for the rest of the day,” Lee Chambers, an environmental psychologist and well-being consultant in Britain, told HuffPost. “A worry-filled morning will often flood into an anxious afternoon.” Conversely, starting the morning with intention creates a sense of calm and confidence that makes the rest of the day seem more manageable. 

So how do you create those morning rituals that will quiet your racing mind and stick with them? Below, experts offer some helpful advice.  

a person standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Be realistic about how much you can dedicate to your morning routine. 

© NickyLloyd via Getty Images 

We asked mental health professionals to recommend some practices that help soothe anxiety. Try out a few of these and check in with how you feel afterwards — but know that it may take some time to see the benefits. Then you can determine if you want to add any to your a.m. routine.

1. Start your day by drinking water. 

Before you have your tea or coffee, hydrate with a glass of a water as soon as you wake up. 

“It gives us increased cognitive function, allowing us more clarity of mind, can elevate our mood and energy, and promotes more balanced emotional regulation and takes less than a minute,” Chambers said. “And it’s a great habit to stack your next part of the routine into, and you can even prepare your water the evening before.”

2. Walk outside. 

Taking a walk outdoors is a calming, grounding way to begin the day.  

“It is also great as it gets sunlight into our eyes, stimulating serotonin, which boosts our mood,” Chambers said. “It also ignites our senses, as the wind hits our face, sounds of the environment fill our ears and we smell the external world. It makes us mindful and eases our worries in the process.”

3. Practice gratitude.

Take a moment to reflect on all of the good in your life. You can list a few things in your head, share them with a partner or child, or write them down in a journal.  

“Start your day with a grateful heart before you even get up from bed,” said Renato Perez, a Los Angeles psychotherapist. “Start naming all the things you’re grateful for. This could be done through prayer or simply a list you say out loud to the universe or Mother Nature.” 

4. Try to avoid checking your phone first thing. 

Those work emails, text messages, Instagram notifications and news alerts can wait a bit. If you charge your phone by your bed or use it as an alarm clock, you’re going to look at it right when you wake up. Before you know it, you’re sucked in and two minutes of scrolling turns into 20. Try charging your phone across the room so it’s not within reach. Or charge it outside of the bedroom and use an alarm clock instead. 

“I see so many people who immediately check their work email in the morning, which automatically puts them in ‘work mode’ and makes them feel anxious about the day ahead before they even get out of bed,” said Gina Delucca, a clinical psychologist at Wellspace SF. “Similarly, some people hop on social media or start reading news articles while lying in bed, which may trigger anxiety by reading or seeing something negative or scary.”

That doesn’t mean you have to avoid your phone altogether, which just isn’t realistic for most of us. “But I definitely recommend giving yourself some peace and quiet in the morning before the daily grind begins,” Delucca added.

5. Take some deep breaths. 

When you’re anxious, you might notice your breathing is quick and shallow, rather than slow and deep. 

“This is a part of our body’s natural stress response, and it coincides with a few of the other physical sensations you may notice when you feel anxious — like rapid heart rate, dizziness and upset stomach,” Delucca said. “While we don’t have voluntary control over some of these bodily sensations, we do have control over our breathing, and we can use our breath to help induce a more relaxed state.”

Those deep, nourishing inhalations and exhalations stimulate the parasympathetic nervous system, producing a sense of calm.

“To begin, try to spend a few minutes each morning sitting or lying in a comfortable position, closing your eyes and taking a few slow, controlled, deep breaths,” Delucca said. “Try breathing in through your nose and then breathing out through either your nose or mouth. When you inhale, imagine that you are filling up a balloon in your abdomen rather than just breathing into your chest.”

6. Meditate.

“There is no better way to quiet the mind than by practicing meditation,” Perez said. “Start small — two to three minutes — and increment every week.”

When your mind wanders away, which it inevitably will, gently bring it back to your breath.

You can sit in silence, listen to relaxing music, do a guided mediation through an app like Calm, Headspace or Insight Timer, or find one on YouTube 

You can also try repeating a mantra — “I am safe, and I will be OK,” is one Delucca suggested. Or do a body scan: Start at the top of your head, bringing awareness to each body part and releasing tension from that area as you slowly work your way down to your toes. 

7. Eat a nourishing breakfast. 

“Our mood is highly influenced by what we eat,” Chambers said.

Opt for a balanced breakfast that contains protein, healthful fats, fiber and complex carbohydrates — think a vegetable omelet with avocado toast or oatmeal with nut butter, berries and chia seeds. Refined carbohydrates, such as doughnuts and sugary cereals, can lead to a blood sugar spike and crash, “causing challenges with emotional regulation, which may leave you feeling anxious,” Chambers added. (That said, if the occasional croissant or chocolate chip muffin brings some joy to your morning, it’s totally fine. Food is meant to be enjoyed, after all.)

8. Read a few pages from a book. 

Rather than reading news or catching up on your social media feeds early in the morning, Perez recommends picking up a book that inspires you and reading for a few minutes ― even just five pages. 

“Find a book that really speaks to you and makes you feel good,” he said.

9. Move your body. 

It could be yoga, walking, running, dancing, cycling, strength-training or even stretching. 

“When you exercise in the morning, you may notice improved focus and energy during the rest of the day, as well as better sleep at night, which can also help to tame anxiety,” Delucca said. “In addition, exercising in the morning can enhance your mood by giving you a boost of endorphins and a sense of accomplishment at the start of your day.”

It’s worth noting that some people report that certain workouts, especially very intense ones, actually stoke their anxiety rather than reduce it. So just be aware of that. 

“We react differently to exercise, and it is a stressor,” Chambers said. “Exercising with too much intensity for some people can lead them to become fatigued and more likely to feel anxious.”

10. Do some visualization.

A visualization practice can help you set the desired tone for your day. If you’re feeling anxious and distracted, perhaps you’d like to feel calm, focused and empowered instead. Seely recommends calling on a memory that evokes that feeling for you. Tune into the small details and sensations of the experience. 

“For example, if I’m visualizing a memory where I hiked up to the peak of a mountain and I’m overlooking the summit, I might notice the details of the incredible view, the sounds of nature around me, the feel of my muscles after climbing the steep terrain, the smell and temperature of the air, the sensation of feeling accomplished, proud, unstoppable,” she said. “Really getting into every sensation of the memory helps your body to soak in the experience and primes your physiology for that particular state of being ― in this example, empowered and ready to take on the day.”

And if you can’t think of a specific memory, allow yourself to daydream and build the desired experience in your imagination. 

How to stick to your morning routine 

You may think your biggest stumbling blocks are a lack of willpower or hitting the snooze button half a dozen times. But often it “comes down to a lack of clarity with the routine,” Delucca said. 

“You’re more likely to follow through on behavior change when you set clear and specific goals versus vague aspirations,” she added. 

So instead of saying something general, like, “I want to work out in the morning,” make the goal more concrete: “I’m going to do a virtual yoga class at 7:30 a.m. after I finish my tea.”

Delucca also recommends getting up around the same time each day and outlining what specific activities you want to incorporate into your routine and in what order. It may help to write them down. 

“When you do something repeatedly in the same order, you can eventually develop a habit,” Delucca said. “When a habit is formed, you’re not solely relying on how you feel in the moment in terms of your mood, motivation or willpower. Habits feel automatic without any guesswork as to what you should do next.”

She offered the example of taking a shower. You likely shampoo, condition, shave and wash your body in a specific order without giving it much thought. 

“It’s automatic because the routine is clear and you’ve created a habit in which one action flows directly into the next action without any questioning,” Delucca said. “So, try to be as specific and consistent as possible when creating a morning routine. Each activity will serve as a cue for the next, and with time, your morning routine will flow.”

Source: https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/wellness/how-to-create-a-morning-routine-that-reduces-anxiety-and-stress/ar-BB197zfX?ocid=msedgdhp

Trendy Short Hairstyles For Fall 2020

Article by Kaitlyn Yarborough for Southern Living

Slide 1 of 19: If we had to choose one hairstyle that will always deliver, it has to be the bob. No matter your face shape, hair texture, or personal style, there is a bob out there to fit the bill—be it super cropped to the chin and cheekbones, long enough to skim the shoulders, or somewhere in between. Short hair is something that makes life just a little bit easier and more flattering as we mature from the long cuts of our college days—and there is no better time to take off a few inches than when heading into the season of apple picking, pie baking, and football watching. Fall is a reason enough to get a fabulous short hairstyle, because why not? From collarbone lobs to short bobs to pixie cuts, these are the best short haircuts to try this fall. 

 © @styledby_carolynn

Stacked Chin Bob

If we had to choose one hairstyle that will always deliver, it has to be the bob. No matter your face shape, hair texture, or personal style, there is a bob out there to fit the bill—be it super cropped to the chin and cheekbones, long enough to skim the shoulders, or somewhere in between. Short hair is something that makes life just a little bit easier and more flattering as we mature from the long cuts of our college days—and there is no better time to take off a few inches than when heading into the season of apple picking, pie baking, and football watching. Fall is a reason enough to get a fabulous short hairstyle, because why not? From collarbone lobs to short bobs to pixie cuts, these are the best short haircuts to try this fall. 

Slide 2 of 19: This chin-hugging cut doesn't take any sass, which just so happens to be the vibe we're trying to muster for the whole autumn season. 

 © @styledby_carolynn

Sharp Short Bob

This chin-hugging cut doesn’t take any sass, which just so happens to be the vibe we’re trying to muster for the whole autumn season. 

Slide 3 of 19: Bring on the vintage feels with this textured bob that frames the face with minimal layering and a soft bend around the temples. 

 @kaansayar1

Waved Chin Bob

Bring on the vintage feels with this textured bob that frames the face with minimal layering and a soft bend around the temples. 

Slide 4 of 19: You really can't go wrong with an in-between length and easy layering that gives volume and movement without requiring too much styling, seen here by stylist Chrissy Rasmussen.

 © @hairby_chrissy

Relaxed Shoulder Cut

You really can’t go wrong with an in-between length and easy layering that gives volume and movement without requiring too much styling, seen here by stylist Chrissy Rasmussen.

Slide 6 of 19: Short hair doesn't have to be boring, and this bob will back us up on that. Long, side-swept bangs are a great option for anyone trying to update their short bob ahead of the season. 

 © @clevelandhairboss

Blunt A-Line Bob

Short hair doesn’t have to be boring, and this bob will back us up on that. Long, side-swept bangs are a great option for anyone trying to update their short bob ahead of the season. 

Slide 7 of 19: If ends could cut glass, we'd bet on this sharp lob-length style any day. For those with naturally straight, fine, or thin hair, this can turn up the style with little-to-no hassle. 

 © @natalieannehair

Sharp Shoulder Cut

If ends could cut glass, we’d bet on this sharp lob-length style any day. For those with naturally straight, fine, or thin hair, this can turn up the style with little-to-no hassle. 

Like what you see? There’s more here:

https://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/home-and-garden/these-trendy-short-hairstyles-are-ready-to-take-on-fall-2020/ss-BB196pkm?ocid=msedgdhp#image=7