How to make a coronavirus face mask at home

 

Feel safer with a mask on ?  Here’s how to make a simple one.  Content from The Today Show:

 

https://www.today.com/style/how-make-face-mask-fabric-home-t177225

ESL Easter Lesson

 

Easter

ESL Easter Lesson

by http://www.elcivics.com

Easter is celebrated on a Sunday between March 22 and April 25. On Easter, people color eggs, have an Easter egg hunt, wear new clothes, watch parades, and eat dinner with their family and friends. Some people go to church. (3 pages)

Baby Chicken Hatching from an Egg What day of the week is Easter on?

    • It is on a Sunday.
  • We say “Happy Easter!”
Coloring Easter Eggs in Plastic Cups with Dye What is the child in this picture doing?

    • He is coloring hard boiled eggs for Easter.
    • The dye is in plastic cups.
  • Pink, yellow, blue, orange, and green are popular Easter colors.

Easter Lesson, Page 2

by http://www.elcivics.com

Two Easter Baskets with Colored Eggs What are these?

    • They are Easter baskets.
  • The Easter baskets are filled with colored eggs.
Girl Holding an Easter Basket Filled with Pink and Purple Eggs Why is the girl smiling?

  • She is smiling because she has a beautiful Easter basket.
Children Running at an Easter Egg Hunt What are these children doing?

    • They are collecting plastic Easter eggs.
    • They will put the eggs in their baskets.
  • There is candy inside the eggs.

 

Easter Lesson, Page 3

by http://www.elcivics.com

Chocolate Easter Bunnies What are these rabbits made of?

    • They are made of chocolate.
  • These chocolate rabbits are cute, and they taste delicious.

 

Rabbit with Long Ears What kind of animal is this?

    • It is a rabbit.
    • Children call baby rabbits bunnies, but they are really kits or kittens.
    • Rabbits have long ears and short tails.
  • Rabbits hop because their back legs are longer than their front legs.

 

Woman wearing an Easter Bonnet with Flowers for the Holiday What is this woman wearing on her head?

    • She is wearing an Easter bonnet.
    • An Easter bonnet is a fancy hat.
  • This bonnet is pink, and it has flowers on it.

How to Cut Your Own Hair At Home Without Ruining It

A young woman holding scissors and cutting her hair

Ragnar Schmuck Getty Images

Article by   for Women’s Health

All you need are these expert tips (a steady hand can’t hurt, either.)

Cutting your hair at home can be a recipe for disaster, and is not recommended by…just about any professional hairstylist. But, desperate times call for desperate measures, and it’s not an impossible task. You’ll just want to closely follow these expert tips and tricks when taking matters into your own hands.

One thing you shouldn’t attempt? Going for a drastic change. The last thing you need is to be left with a haircut that makes you more upset than the way it was before you messed with it. Leave a major chop up to the professionals, post-quarantine. However, if you have a few rogue split ends or overgrown bangs, that’s something you can manage—promise. Here, hairstylists share their professional guidance on how to cut your own hair at home.

A general rule of thumb to keep in mind before getting started: Less is more! “You can always take more off if you decide you want to, but you can’t glue it back on,” warns celebrity hairstylist and Biolage Brand Ambassador, Sunnie Brook. She recommends starting a trim with clean, dry hair, so you see the hair in its truest form and know the results immediately. “Wet hair stretches, so if you cut it wet it will be shorter than you expect” says T3 celebrity hairstylist, Laura Polko. She agrees with Brook, advising not to overdo it and get carried away with your trim.

Invest in some proper tools.

Having the right tools for cutting your hair is a must, and your kitchen scissors just won’t do. “Craft or kitchen scissors tend to ‘snag’ the hair, making for an unclean, uneven finish that’s also not healthy for your hair,” says Polko, “A good pair of scissors is worth the investment. I find that ones that are about four to five inches long are easiest to handle. Go for a good Japanese pair. They will last you a lifetime and probably save you a few dollars on salon visits” says Brook.

Brook also recommends using a wide tooth comb when cutting your hair on your own. “Fine tooth combs put a lot of tension on the hair, which is great if youre a hairdresser and want a hard line, but a wide tooth comb is easier on the hair, giving you a softer line.” A softer line helps to create more subtle cut, which is easier to manage and harder to mess up.

Cut for your hair type.

Considering your hair type when attempting a cut is very important, especially for people rocking wavy or curly strands. No matter your texture, think about how you wear your hair the most often to determine how it should be when you cut it. For instance, if you have curly hair but always wear it blown out, you’ll want to cut it while it’s blown out.

For curly or wavy hair, Brook recommends letting it air dry naturally so you can see its shape. Then, twist the sections you want to trim. “This gives the strand a tapered finish which lends to a softer texture. It also helps the curl not bounce up as much,” says Brook. And rather than trimming straight across, cut into your ends for a softer, more natural finish. This is also referred to as “point cutting.”

For straight hair, it’s a bit of a different story. Brook advises blow drying hair first using a flat brush. This is the most efficient way to see clean lines in your cut, which is a great initial guide to see what’s out of place and needs to be trimmed up. “Break up your hair into small sections all around your head and work your way up cutting from the bottom to the top using the point cut method,” she says (here’s a useful primer).

Brook suggests using a light treatment spray before and after your trim as they help with frizz and manageability. She loves the BIOLAGE All-In-One Coconut Infusion Multi-Benefit Treatment Spray which also protects from heat and prevents split ends .

Begin by creating shape around your face.

Figuring out the best place to start your hair-cutting escapade can be flat out daunting, so start with smaller pieces and cuts until you find your groove. “I usually start around the face to create a shape and then use that as my guide to connect the front to the lengths,” explains Brook. She recommends using clips to section away the hair you don’t want to cut. “This will give you control as you cut and protect you from cutting more than you want.”

Polko agrees with Brook, and adds you should “definitely make sure the front pieces on both sides of the face match up. You do not want one side that is longer than the other!” She suggests that every time you cut a small section of hair, to measure its length by comparing it with a piece from the exact same spot on the other side of your face. Pull both pieces to the front—underneath your chin—and see if they are even. Here you can determine if you need to trim a little more or less to match the other side so that it’s symmetrical.

Take extra care for bangs and layers.

Cutting bangs would likely fall into the category of drastic change so it’s best to leave it to the professionals, but trimming existing ones is a much easier task to manage. “When you comb down your bangs over your forehead to prep the cut, use very light tension,” says Polko. “Too much tension will have the same effect as if you were to cut wet hair—it will bounce back up after it dries and most likely be shorter than you were hoping for.”

Brook recommends starting your trim just below your brows but above your lash-line. Start by taking just the middle section—and clipping the sides out of the way—so you can set the length. “Twist the section and take the tip of your scissors and cut into the ends of the hair to remove some length. Hold thicker sections between your fingers as you cut,” she says. Brook also loves using a bang face shield to make the process easier by allowing you to get closer to your face with your scissors.

Layers are also super important to keep in mind when cutting your own hair, especially if you already have them. Brook recommends combing your hair straight up to see in “a 45 or 90 degree angle, then point cutting to remove dry ends and length.” To add in layers, she suggests taking a small section of hair at your ends and making small cuts with your scissors vertically (again, point cutting). It adds some light texture and creates a softer edge for your ends.

“I like splitting hair down the middle and directing it forward at a diagonal. Trim hair from chin length down to your ends at an angle and continue to match up for the rest of the layers,” says Polko. She advises using a straightening iron after a cut or trim to really showcase it.

https://www.womenshealthmag.com/beauty/a19966613/how-to-cut-your-own-hair/

PM Modi’s ‘9 pm for 9 minutes’ is huge success across India

a group of people standing in front of a birthday cake with lit candles: PM Modi's '9 pm for 9 minutes' is huge success across India

© Provided by The Statesman PM Modi’s ‘9 pm for 9 minutes’ is huge success across India

Just as the nation, on Sunday, observed “9 pm for 9 minutes” on the call of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, many celebrities from different fields shared their moments of lighting up the dark, symbolically chasing away the deadly COVID-19 causing Coronavirus.

On Sunday at 9 pm for nine minutes, the common people and big shots of India alike stood up as one in lighting candles, diyas and torch lights to dispel the darkness and gloom brought by the outbreak of the deadly novel Coronavirus that has so far affected 1,225,360 people worldwide and caused 66,542 deaths while in India 3,577 cases have tested positive and 83 people succumbed to the virus.

At 9 pm India turned off its lights for 9 minutes and lit up candles and diyas as appealed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi to chase away darkness and gloom brought by the outbreak of the deadly novel Coronavirus.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi had appealed to the nation to switch off lights in their houses and come together and light candles or diyas tonight at 9 pm. PM had claimed that the move is to dispel the darkness and gloom brought by the outbreak of the deadly novel Coronavirus.

In his 11-minute message to the people, the PM termed it as an attempt to show coronavirus, the strength of Indian unity and ‘light’.

“We must all go through this darkness together. Those who are most affected by this are the poor and marginalised. To overcome this darkness, we must all unite to spread the light. Make this darkness of Coronavirus meet the light we all spread,” the Prime Minister said as India completed the first ten days of the 21-day lockdown.

https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/other/pm-modis-9-pm-for-9-minutes-is-huge-success-across-india/ar-BB12c6MC

Hit the reset button with our 30-day mental wellness challenge

Article by Colleen De Bellefonds

Writing for WellandGood.com  May, 2019

Hit the reset button with our 30-day mental wellness challenge

Photo: Tim Gibson for W+G

Show me a person who’s never felt stressed or down in the dumps. No really, I’d like to meet that glittery rainbow unicorn. And so would the Well+Good reader, 95 percent of whom reported being stressed in a 2018 survey.

It’s Mental Health Awareness Month, which means that it’s the perfect time to re-prioritize our mental well-being. That’s why we created a 30-day Mental Wellness Challenge: a month’s worth of daily tasks designed to help you prioritize your mental wellness needs.

“The data shows that small changes build up. When we notice ourselves making changes to feel better, we start to feel better,” says Natalie Dattilo, Ph.D., director of psychology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Department of Psychiatry and a member of the American Psychological Association.

Dr. Datillo regularly uses the mnemonic “ESCAPE” to discuss mental wellness with her clients. The acronym stands for Exercise (an instant mood booster and stress reducer), Sleep (which helps your brain function at its best), Connect and Appreciate (because social connections and gratitude can foster better mental health), Pleasure (an important component of overall happiness), and Exhale (a powerful way to calm anxieties and reduce stress). These six strategies, she says, are the most science-backed ways to manage stress and emotions to promote better mental well-being.

Each tip in the month-long challenge is designed to help you to re-define self care, manage daily stressors, start a conversation around mental health, or address a common lifestyle trigger that impacts mental health. No matter your current mental state—from feeling mildly stressed to dealing with something more serious—these tips can provide a reminder to take a minute for yourself to find balance and peace in the daily chaos of life. These tasks should only be part of your overall mental wellness plan; they complement treatment but don’t replace it.

This challenge is also about trying new strategies to find out what works for you. So keep your mind open to experimentation. “Don’t feel guilty if something you try doesn’t work for you. Something else will,” says psychologist Aimee Daramus, Psy.D.At the end of the 30 days, choose the changes that have the biggest impact on your happiness, and keep them up the rest of the year for a calmer, centered you.

Ready to start the challenge? Here’s what we’ve got in store for you for the next 30 days:

mental health challenge graphic textPin It
Photo: W+G Creative

To read how each day is planned, click on the link below:

https://www.wellandgood.com/good-advice/mental-wellness-challenge/

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden!

Article by Finding Sea Turtles

We’ve rounded up 16 nectar rich perennials for hummingbirds. Plants that attract these beautiful birds to your garden space. And plants that’ll invite them to return for more nectar throughout the season. Take a look and let us know what you think.

  1. Monarda 

Monarda is also known as Bee Balm, Bergamot, and Oswego Tea. Bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds are attracted to Monarda. A North American native perennial and part of the mint family. Bright colorful blooms with fragrant foliage. Bee Balm is a great attraction to hummingbirds and other pollinators. Use for making potpourri or herbal wreaths and teas.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Raspberry Wine Monarda #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden – Raspberry Wine Monarda

Raspberry Wine Monarda has berry red tubular flowers. Early formed buds resemble raspberries. Blooms from early Summer to early Fall. Grows in zones 4 to 9 in part Sun and part shade to full Sun. Reaches 30 inches tall. Beneficial to pollinators. Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Fragrant long blooming perennial that can be used as cut flowers too. Tolerant of clay soil and wet site conditions.

 

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Balmy Rose Monarda #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Balmy Rose Monarda

Balmy Rose Monarda has bold rose pink flowers. Blooms from late Spring to midSummer. Grows in zones 4 to 9 in full Sun to mostly sunny. Reaches 10 to 12 inches tall. Beneficial to pollinators. Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Long blooming perennial that can be used as cut flowers too. Tolerant of clay soil and wet site conditions.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Balmy Pink Monarda #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Balmy Pink Monarda

Balmy Pink Monarda has spiky pink flowers, similar to the finale of a fireworks display. Blooms from late Spring to midSummer. Grows in zones 4 to 9 in full Sun to mostly sunny. Reaches 10 to 12 inches tall. Beneficial to pollinators, attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Long blooming perennial that can be used as cut flowers too. Tolerant of clay soil and wet site conditions.

2.  Hibiscus 

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! 16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Rose Mallow Hibiscus #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Rose Mallow Hibiscus

Rose Mallow Hibiscus has lavender pink blooms. Hibiscus Rose mallow blooms are 7 to 8 inches wide with ruffled petals and a cherry red eye. Blooms from midSummer to early Fall. Grows in zones 4 to 9 in part shade and part Sun to full Sun. Topping out between 40 to 48 inches. Attracts hummingbirds. Deer resistant. A densely compact shrub-like North American native. Rose Mallow is part of the Summerific series.

3.  Salvia

Salvia is also known as Meadow Sage. A tried and true perennial. Ideal for dried or cut flower arrangements. Produces an intense show of color over the Summer months. Pollinators are drawn to Salvia floral spikes. Performs best in full Sun. Deer resistant.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Midnight Model Salvia #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Midnight Model Salvia

Perennials for Hummingbirds – Midnight Model Salvia

Midnight Model Salvia has vibrant-blue flower spikes with lush foliage. Blooms late Spring to early Summer. Forms a dense mounding growth habit. Grows in zones 3 to 8 in mostly sunny to full Sun. Reaches 22 to 24 inches tall. Beneficial to pollinators, attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Long blooming perennial that can be grown in containers. Ideal for cut flowers. Tolerant of sandy soil conditions. Plant on a slope or bank. Tolerant of hot dry site and seaside/salt conditions. Hybridized at Walters Gardens.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Pretty In Pink Salvia #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Pretty In Pink Salvia

Perennials for Hummingbirds – Pretty in Pink Salvia

Pretty in Pink Salvia has bright lavender pink flowers with lush foliage. Blooms late Spring to early Summer. Grows in zones 3 to 8 in mostly sunny to full Sun. Reaches 18 to 20 inches tall. Beneficial to pollinators, attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Long blooming perennial that can be grown in containers. Ideal for cut flowers. Tolerant of sandy soil conditions. Plant on a slope or bank. Tolerant of hot dry site and seaside/salt conditions. Hybridized at Walters Gardens.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Bumbleblue Salvia #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Bumbleblue Salvia

Perennials for Hummingbirds – Bumbleblue Salvia

Bumbleblue Salvia has intense violet blue flowers with deep green foliage. Blooms early to mid Summer. Grows in zones 3 to 8 in mostly sunny to full Sun. Reaches 12 to 14 inches tall. Beneficial to pollinators. Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Long blooming, petite perennial that can be grown in containers. Ideal for cut flowers. Tolerant of sandy or clay soil conditions. Plant on a slope or bank. Tolerant of hot dry site and seaside/salt conditions.

4.  Phlox

Phlox is also known as a garden phlox. Considered the perennial garden “backbone”. Phlox provides unrivaled flowering over the Summer months. Crisp colors and fragrant blooms. Makes excellent cut flower bouquet. A great selection for colder climates.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Orange Perfection Phlox #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Orange Perfection Phlox

Orange Perfection Phlox has salmon orange blooms. Blooms late Summer to early Fall. Grows in zones 4 to 8 in full Sun. Reaches 36 inches tall. Fragrant perennial attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. A long blooming perennial that can be used for cut flowers.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Cosmopolitan Phlox #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Cosmopolitan Phlox

Cosmopolitan Phlox has bright pink blooms. Blooms from mid Summer to early Fall. Grows in zones 4 to 8 in full Sun. Tops out at 12 to 16 inches tall. Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Long blooming fragrant perennial that can be used as cut flowers. Tolerant of sandy and clay soil conditions. Mid Summer color at its best.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Cloudburst Phlox #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Cloudburst Phlox

Cloudburst Tall Cushion Phlox has lavender purple flowers with bright pink eyes. Foliage has dark green leaves. Blooms in the Summer. Grows in zones 4 to 8 in full Sun. Reaches 26 to 28 inches tall. Fragrant long blooming perennial. Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Mounding growth habit and native North American perennial. Plant Cloudburst in garden borders, containers, or in mass plantings. Use as cut flowers.

5.  Agastache 

Agastache is known as Hyssop or Hummingbird Mint. Blooms are attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies. Goldfinches are drawn to the seeds. Scented foliage can be used to flavor drinks. Plant in a garden border or in a container.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Firebird Agastache #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Firebird Agastache

Perennials for Hummingbirds – Firebird Agastache

Firebird Agastache has nectar rich filled blooms that are fiery coppery, orange-coral in color. Foliage is a striking gray-green. Blooms early Summer to early Fall. Grows in zones 6 to 10 in mostly sunny to full Sun. Reaches 2 to 3 feet tall. Beneficial for pollinators. Attracts butterflies and hummingbirds. Deer and rabbit resistant. Long blooming fragrant perennial. Plant in garden beds or in containers. Tolerant of hot dry garden sites.

16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! Rosie Posie Agastache #Perennials #Garden #Gardening #Landscape #PerennialsForHummingbirds #Hummingbirds #Pollinators #GardenPollinators
16 Perennials That Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden! – Rosie Posie Agastache

Perennials for Hummingbirds – Rosie Posie Agastache

Rosie Posie Agastache has bicolor masses of hot-pink flowers with magenta-purple calyxes. Foliage is bright-green minty aromatic. Blooms from early Summer to early Fall. Grows in zones 6 to 9 in full Sun. Reaches 18 to 22 inches tall. Attracts hummingbirds and butterflies. Deer resistant. Plant in garden beds and borders. Once established, tolerant of drought conditions.

Click on the link below to continue the article.

https://findingseaturtles.com/perennials-for-hummingbirds/?utm_medium=social&utm_source=pinterest&utm_campaign=

tailwind_smartloop&utm_content=smartloop&utm_term=11471224