10 of the longest flowering perennials for your garden

By Niki Jabbour

A well-designed garden provides interest from early spring through late autumn, and beyond if you also select plants for winter structure. But, for the main growing season, much of that interest comes from flowering and foliage plants. Gardeners who want a lower maintenance landscape would be wise to look for perennial plants that are both easy-to-grow and offer a long blooming period. Most perennial plants flower for two to four weeks, but the longest flowering perennials, like coneflowers and catmint, measure their flowering period in months, not weeks.

The Longest Flowering Perennials

When planning a garden with long-blooming perennials, the same basic rules of design apply; choose a mixture of early, mid-season, and late-flowering plants. Of course, you can also affect both the bloom time and length of the flowering period with pruning practices; pinching, deadheading, and shearing. Read on to discover how to encourage months of blooms by combining clever pruning with the longest flowering perennials.

The Early Bloomers:

Catmint ‘Walker’s Low’ (Nepeta racemosa ‘Walker’s Low’, zones 3 to 9). With its relaxed, trouble-free growth habit, ‘Walker’s Low’ catmint is a perfect fit for a cottage garden or rock garden, or the front edge of a perennial border or rose garden. Plus, the plants bloom their heads off from late spring until mid-autumn with a heavy show of purple-blue flower spikes that are extremely attractive to pollinators and beneficial insects. It’s no wonder this drought-tolerant, hardy plant was chosen as the 2007 Perennial Plant of the Year. Once the initial flush of flowers begins to fade, give the plant a haircut, shearing it back by about one-half. Without a trim, the plant will continue to flower moderately, but a good shearing encourages tidy foliage and plenty of blooms that will persist until frost.

Catmint is one of the longest flowering perennials.

Geranium ‘Rozanne’ (Geranium x ‘Rozanne’, zones 4 to 9). I don’t like to throw the term ‘low-maintenance’ around irresponsibility, but with ‘Rozanne’, it’s the perfect description. This hardy plant forms 12 to 18 inch tall mounds of spreading foliage, which is topped from early summer until frost with two-inch wide, violet-blue flowers. After its initial bloom, the plants will continue to pump out a moderate amount of fresh flowers for months. However, if you shear the plants back by one-third after the first blossoms fade, you’ll encourage another heavy show of flowers.

Bleeding Heart ‘Luxuriant’ (Dicentra formosa ‘Luxuriant’, zones 2 to 9). Long-blooming perennials for shady spaces are hard to come by, but this is where ‘Luxuriant’ shines! Growing just knee-high, this hardy selection produces clusters of reddish-pink, heart-shaped blooms throughout late spring and summer. The ferny foliage is also attractive, and makes a nice foil for the old-fashioned flowers. Plant this shade-tolerant perennial in a woodland garden, shady border, or along a tree-lined pathway. Clipping out faded flowers will ensure months of bloom.

Pruning Tip – Don’t be afraid to grab those pruning shears once that initial bloom of spring flowers starts to wind down. Many perennials, like Geranium ‘Rozanne’ will continue to produce flowers all season, but in a lesser quantity. If you want a heavier bloom, shear the plants back by one-third to one-half to push out fresh foliage and flowers.

The Mid-Season Superstars:

Ornamental Onion ‘Millenium’ (Allium ‘Millenium’, zones 5 to 9). The 2018 Perennial Plant of the Year, ‘Millenium’ is a showy selection with grassy foliage and two-inch diameter, rounded flower clusters in a cheerful shade of lavender-purple. The flowers bloom for around six weeks each summer, attracting every bee, butterfly, and beneficial insect for miles around. The one-foot tall and wide clumps are perfect for the front of a perennial border or a rock garden where the ball-shaped blooms can be appreciated. Technically a bulb, this plant is usually sold as a potted perennial and can be planted in spring or fall. Unlike many perennials, pruning doesn’t produce more flowers.

Millenium Allium is a long flowering perennial that's attractive to bees and butterflies.

Coneflower ‘White Swan’ and ‘Magnus’ (Echinacea purpurea, zones 3 to 9). Coneflowers are the cornerstone of a summer perennial garden, blooming for months, even in dry, hot conditions, and providing food for butterflies, bees, and other pollinators. There are countless cultivars available to gardeners, but for months of flowers, it’s hard to beat old school selections like ‘Magnus’ and ‘White Swan’. ‘Magnus’ is a classic purple-flowering coneflower, while ’White Swan’ has large blooms with white petals and orange-copper cones. Both flower from early summer into mid-autumn, especially when deadheaded regularly.

Coreopsis ‘Full Moon’ (Coreopsis x ‘Full Moon’, zones 5 to 9). This eye-catching plant is among the longest flowering perennials with a season that stretches from early summer to early autumn. It’s also the first introduction in the new ‘Big Bang’ series of coreopsis, boasting large, soft yellow flowers that grow up to three-inches across. It also has excellent drought tolerance and is popular with the pollinators. ‘Moonbeam’ is another popular long-flowering coreopsis with pale yellow blooms that are smaller, but no less plentiful than those of ‘Full Moon’. With both cultivars, deadhead flowers as they fade to encourage new buds.

Moonbeam coreopsis is very easy to grow and attractive to butterflies.

Astilbe (Astilbe species, zones 4 to 9). Astilbe stands out among the longest flowering perennials. Besides being super easy to grow, they thrive in both sunny and shaded gardens, and have feathery flowers that offers months of graceful color. And speaking of color, the blooms can be white, lavender, purple, bubblegum, deep pink, apricot, or red, often with bronze or purple foliage as well. The plants form tidy clumps with the flower plumes emerging in early to mid summer and persisting into winter. The plants do appreciate ample moisture and regular watering in dry summers can prolong the blooming period. Outstanding cultivars include ‘Bridal Veil’, ‘Pumila’, and ‘Fanal‘.

Plant long-blooming astilbe for months of bold color.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium, zones 3 to 9). A butterfly favorite, yarrow is a robust summer bloomer with pretty, flat-topped flowers that bloom for 6 to 8 weeks. The ferny foliage emerges in early spring and is followed by the two to four-foot tall flower stems in early summer. Yarrow is one of the longest flowering perennials that grows best in full sun with well-drained soil of average fertility; over-fertilizing can cause the stems to flop over. Flower colours can range from soft pastels to rich jewel shades. Deadhead spent flowers by clipping the flower stem back to the main foliage. Top varieties include ‘Moonshine’, which has pale, yellow flowers and ‘Cerise Queen’, a bright cherry-red bee magnet.

Yarrow is a long blooming perennial.

Pruning Tip – As summer flowers fade, deadhead often, cutting down to a fresh stem or set of leaves. This will push the plants to continue producing more blooms. Small flowered perennials, like ‘Moonbeam’ Coreopsis, can be quickly and easily deadheaded with hedge shears, rather than snipping individual blooms. In late summer, as flowering winds down, stop deadheading to allow some blooms to go to seed. Seedheads provide valuable food for birds and add interest to the winter garden.

Fantastic Fall Flowers:

Black-eyed Susan ‘Goldsturm’ (Rudbeckia fulgida ‘Goldsturm’, zones 3 to 9). Widely considered to be among the best perennials of all time, ’Goldstrum’ lights up the late summer garden with weeks and weeks of bold color that persists into October. Each coneflower-shaped flower has a raised chocolate-brown center cone that is surrounded by golden petals. The drought-tolerant plants grow about two-feet tall and offer the best visual effect when planted en masse. Deadhead faded flowers to prolong the bloom period.

Rudbeckia Goldsturm is a long flowering perennial.

Purple Flame Grass (Miscanthus sinensis ‘Purpurascens’, zones 3 to 9). Maiden grasses add striking form and texture to the perennial border all summer long. By late summer, many cultivars produce soft, feathery plumes that emerge above the narrow foliage. Purple Flame Grass is a medium-sized maiden grass, growing three to four-feet tall with foliage that turns from bright green to fiery reddish-orange in early autumn. The attractive plumes are silvery-white and persist on the plants throughout winter. Plant it in a sunny site with well-drained soil. Pruning is only necessary in early spring when the dried foliage and flower stems from the previous season are cut back before the fresh growth emerges.

Pruning Tip – In late spring, pinch out the tips of late summer and fall blooming perennials like sneezeweed, Joe Pye weed, Russian sage, and Sedum ‘Autumn Joy’. Pinching will slow flowering and produce bushier growth, which means more flower-bearing stems.

For more tips on gardening, visit this web site:

https://savvygardening.com/longest-flowering-perennials/

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The Pillow Method

Rewire your subconscious thoughts just before falling asleep.

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No !  Not that !   This is The Pillow Method:

The pillow method is an expansion of your traditional affirmations. The idea is simple. You write what you desire and put it under your pillow. Every night before you sleep and when you awaken, read the positive message. This is one out of 13 manifestation techniques that actually work! For the rest make sure to see the full post below!

Another tool to use to remove the negative and let the positive shine in.

 

Credit:  sleepeducation.org; modernmanifestations.com

Hilary ? Again ? Really ?

First this:

Now this:

Hillary Clinton “Feels the Urge” to Run Against Trump Again

by Matt Palumbo
There’s still nine months to the election, but things aren’t looking great for the 2020 Democrats. In the hypothetical head-to-head polls President Trump trounces all his opponents, and the bookmaker’s odds favor his re-election.

It’s late now – but could another candidate enter the race with the ability to defeat Trump? One has reported thinking about entering – but we already know they don’t have the ability to defeat Trump.

As the New York Post reported: Nearly four years after President Trump defeated her in the 2016 election, Hillary Clinton said she has an “urge” to run again because she thinks she can win this time.

The main stream media just might be starting to dump on Joe Biden to make way for Hilary Clinton to run against Trump again.  It will happen at DNC convention.
Credits to ABC News & Dan Bongino.com & Twitter

 

What to Know About Coronavirus

The Deadly Virus That Just Entered the U.S. from China

 

a group of different colors: A coronavirus outbreak has caused hundreds of illnesses and 25 deaths in China, and two cases have been confirmed in the U.S. Doctors explain what you should know.

DR GOPAL MURTI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY – Getty Image

A coronavirus outbreak has caused hundreds of illnesses and 25 deaths in China. Currently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed two official cases of the infection within the United States.

A person returning to Washington state from Wuhan, China,—where an outbreak of coronavirus is taking place—was diagnosed with coronavirus earlier this week. Today, the CDC said a second infection has been diagnosed in a Chicago woman who returned after traveling to the area. Texas A&M University has also confirmed that “a student may have a possible case of novel coronavirus.”

U.S. health officials are currently monitoring 63 other potential cases across 22 states. Despite a growing number of cases in Asia, the World Health Organization says “it is still too early to declare a public health emergency of international concern.”

This type of coronavirus, known as 2019-nCoV, was originally thought to spread from animals to people, “but person-to-person spread of 2019-nCoV is occurring,” the CDC says. So, how worried should you be? Here, everything you need to know about coronavirus, its symptoms, and what experts think about its potential impact within the U.S.

How worried should you be about coronavirus?

Hundreds of people in China have been infected with coronavirus and hospitalized, and it’s a little scary that it’s now in the U.S. But infectious disease experts say you shouldn’t panic. “The CDC is really on top of this,” Dr. Schaffner says.

Infectious disease doctors and public health officials are also “very aware” of coronavirus around the country, he adds, and many have implemented steps where patients with respiratory symptoms are now asked whether they’ve recently been to China or have had contact with someone recently who has been to the country. If the answer is “yes,” they’ll be quarantined.

People coming through five different airports in the U.S. are also now being screened for coronavirus, which can help detect cases early. “We have two cases right now and they’re pretty well contained, but we can expect more,” Dr. Adalja says. Despite the headlines, he also stresses that “contacts of the two case patients are being monitored and would only be contagious when symptomatic.”

To steer clear of any possible infection (especially during flu season), he says to practice good hand hygiene and try to steer clear of people who appear to be sick. The CDC also recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to Wuhan, China.

By Korin Miller of Prevention Magazine

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/health-news/what-to-know-about-coronavirus-the-deadly-virus-that-just-entered-the-us-from-china/ar-BBZdwwu?ocid=spartanntp

 

Lakers bring in grief counselors following Kobe Bryant’s death

By Vincent Frank, Sportsnaut

We were reminded the hard way on Sunday that NBA players are much more than those who provide highlight-reel plays on the court. Following the tragic death of Los Angeles Lakers legend Kobe Bryant at the age of 41 in an helicopter accident, this became all too real.

a group of people standing around a table

Sandy Hooper-USA TODAY via Imagn

One day after the fact, many people are still having a hard time processing the tragedy.

The Lakers are doing what they can to help their employees. That includes the organization bringing in grief counselors to help, both in one-on-one and group settings.

This is the right way to do things. Lakers players will be forced to take to the court against the Los Angeles Clippers on Tuesday. No matter what transpires between now than then, they will do so with heavy hearts.

At the very least, some professionals can help the likes of LeBron James and Co. continue with their grieving process.

Bryant was among nine killed in Southern California late Sunday morning, along with his daughter Gianna.

Our thoughts continue to go out to the Bryant family, the Lakers organization and the families of those impacted by the tragedy.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/nba/lakers-bring-in-grief-counselors-following-kobe-bryants-death/ar-BBZnJvX?ocid=spartanntp

U.K. Garden Idea’s

Planting scheme’s from Jo’s Gardens, an award winning garden design business based near Falmouth in Cornwall.

“Jo’s artistic approach and knowledge of horticulture help her to create beautiful planting schemes that bring her gardens alive.   When the plants are happy in their environment and working in harmony with one another then the garden will flourish and continually evolve through the seasons and years.

From drifts of grasses and perennials to herb gardens, roses and meadows  – please take a look at some of our planting schemes.”

Contemporary plant border, Falmouth

Roses and nepeta smother the top of a Cornish hedge, St. Mawes

Roses and nepeta smother the top of a Cornish hedge, St. Mawes

Gravel Garden, Falmouth

Gravel Garden, Falmouth

Grasses and perennials smother a hot sunny bank

Grasses and perennials smother a hot sunny bank

Lime greens and purples - Ferns and cirsium

Lime greens and purples – Ferns and cirsium

Autumn mix of perennials & grasses

Autumn mix of perennials & grasses

See more planting idea’s at:

http://jogardens.co.uk/home